ALGERIA

ALGERIA

ALGERIA

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Name: Notre-Dame d’Afriquel
Location: Algiers, Algeria
Notre Dame d'Afrique (Our Lady of Africa) is a Roman Catholic basilica in Algiers, Algeria.

It was Louis-Antoine-Augustin Pavy, who served as the Bishop of Algiers from 1846 to 1866, who paved the way for its construction. The basilica was inaugurated in 1872, after fourteen years of construction. It was founded by Charles Lavigerie. Its architect, Jean-Eugène Fromageau, who had been appointed the chief architect for ecclesiastical buildings in French Algeria in 1859, employed a Neo-Byzantine style. Its floor plan is unusual as the choir is situated on the southeast instead of the usual east side of the building.

The basilica contains 46 stained glass windows installed in the 19th century. They were blown out during a bombing of the area in April 1943 and have been restored twice since the end of World War II.

The basilica was damaged by the 2003 Boumerdès earthquake. A reconstruction project was initiated by Archbishop Henri Teissier in 2003, but work on the project didn't start until the spring of 2007. The total cost of restoration was 5.1 million euros.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notre-Dame_d%27Afrique
Name: Botanical Garden Hamma
Location: Algiers, Algeria
The Test Garden of Hamma, (French: Jardin d'Essai du Hamma) is a 58-hectare (140-acre) botanical garden of gardens and 20 hectares (49 acres) of arboretum located in the Mohamed Belouizdad (formerly Hamma-Anassers) district of Algiers. It was established in 1832.

Auguste Hardy was named director of the Botanical Garden in 1842. Many animal species were introduced to the garden at that time, and it expanded several times. As well as the animal and vegetable produce, industry relating to new technology occupied a lot of space, and employed a lot of people.

Between 1848 and 1867 the garden expanded several times, until it arrived at its current configuration. In 1860, a lake was created and an exterior boulevard constructed. The garden was renamed the Acclimatization Garden (French: Jardin d'Acclimatation) in 1861. In 1867, an estimated 8,214 species could be found in the garden.

It is now home to the Algerian National Institute of Agronomical Research. There are currently an estimated 1,200 different species of plant in the garden.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Botanical_Garden_Hamma
Name: Martyrs’ Memorial
Location: Algiers, Algeria
The Maqam Echahid (English: Martyrs' Memorial) is an iconic concrete monument commemorating the Algerian war for independence. The monument was opened in 1982 on the 20th anniversary of Algeria's independence. It is fashioned in the shape of three standing palm leaves which shelter the "Eternal Flame" beneath. At the edge of each palm leaf stands a statue of a soldier, each representing a stage of Algeria's struggle.

The Martyrs Memorial is located on the heights of Algiers, in the municipality of El Madania, west of the Bois des arcades, east of Diar el Mahçoul and north of the plaza shopping center Riadh El Feth. It overlooks the neighborhood of Hamma (common Belouizdad) and the Botanical Garden Hamma (known as Jardin d'essai) in the north. The monument has been erected on the site of an ancient military fort.

Consisting of three stylized fins that join mid-height, the concrete monument built by the Canadian company Lavalin, based on a model produced in the Fine Art Institute of Algiers, under the leadership of Bashir Yelles, reaches a height of 92 metres (302 ft).

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martyrs%27_Memorial,_Algiers
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN ALGERIA / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

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COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO ALGERIA.
FACTS:
Official Languages: Arabic / Berber / French
Currency: Algeria Dinar (DZD)
Time zone: CET (UTC+1)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +213
Local / up-to-date weather in Algiers (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Algeria travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Algeria, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO ALGERIA.

Algerian currency is the Algerian dinar, denoted by the symbol “د.ج” or “DA” (ISO code: DZD). There are coins of DA5, DA10, DA20, DA50 and DA100. Banknotes are issued in DA100, DA200, DA500, DA1000, DA2000, DA5000 denominations.

Money can be exchanged at banks or post offices. Make sure that the exchanged bills are in good condition; people tend to be picky with accepting ripped and older bills. Be careful with currencies other than euros or US dollars – it could be hard to find a bank that exchanges less common currencies.

A better exchange rate can usually be found by exchanging money through unofficial money changers on street corners. There are locations where this is incredibly common practice. The exchange rate offered is generally greatly better than the official rate. It seems to be a very safe practice, and is often done in view of police, who don’t seem concerned.

ATMs are widely available and can be found in every post office or larger bank where you can withdraw Algerian dinar with any major credit card and Maestro cards. If a pin with 6 numbers is necessary just enter two zeros before your pin. A lot of Algerian branded ATMs don’t work for foreign cards (even when showing that they support Mastercard or Visa). You may have luck with Societé Générale ATMs.

Generally speaking, Algeria is a very cash-based society and most establishments won’t accept credit cards. Some hotels do (in particular larger establishments), but a number don’t. Bringing a large supply of Euro in cash can result in much cheaper travels by taking advantage of the much better exchange rates offered by the unofficial exchange market as mentioned above.

Algeria is a huge country and travelling between major cities can take a lot of time and nerves as well, while the distances in the more populated north are not so big and a trip from the east to the west can be done in a day travelling to cities in the Sahara is more difficult since the south is barely connected with good roads, train and bus connections.

BY PLANE:

From Algiers you can reach almost every major Algerian city by plane, and it is highly recommended to take a flight when travelling longer routes and to Saharan cities. Houari Boumediene, in Algier, is the only modern airport in the country; the other airports are more like airfields and lacking infrastructure.

Air Algérie is the national carrier with many flights to almost all Algerian cities with an airport. The prices vary regarding of the length of the flown route; airfares to smaller and Sahara.

Cities tend to be pricier than between bigger cities (such as Oran to Algier). The airline uses Houari Boumediene Airport as its hub, and almost all flights start or land there. There are seven daily flights to Oran from Algiers and five daily flights to Annaba and Costantine. Other destinations served from Algiers daily or several days weekly are Adrar, El Oued, Tebessa, Batna, Biskra, Sétif, In Ames, Tindouf, Timmoun, Tlemcen, Tamanrasset, Tiaret, Tebessa, El Goela, Ouaragla, Hassi Mesaoud, Bejaia, Ghrardaia, Tlemcen, Illizi, Djanet, Touggourt, and Béchar.

BY TAXI:

It’s usual to take a taxi to travel between near cities or in cities, the prices are pretty moderate but when travelling between bigger cities with large distances taxis are the same or more expensive as flying. Try to avoid unofficial taxis since it’s very likely the driver will rip you off. Most Taxis have no taximeter so arrange a price in advance. Many drivers will try to take advantage of your lack of knowledge but never pay more than 30 DA per km regardless of what you are told. Tipping is not necessary but you can round up to the next 10 DA.

BY CAR:

The road network is well developed in the north, the Algerian government has made much improvements in the last years regarding road building, new highways were built to replace the already marod roads. The most important highway is the 1200 km long N1 (Route est-ouest) from Annaba to Oran, almost all bigger cities in the north are connected to this highway including Algiers.

A car is not absolutely necessary because of the well running public transportation system, but could be sometimes useful to reach more remote areas. Keep in mind that driving habits are completely different compared to western norms and that rules and prohibitive signs are more seen as guidelines, even by the police! It would be a wise decision letting a local Algerian do the driving for you in the first days to get an impression of the driving style, if this is not possible it’s recommended to stay on the highways.

Do not try to reach Saharan areas with a car other than a 4×4, occasional dunes on the roads and extreme temperature changes will offer a challenge for the driver and the car.

As of 2018, fuel will not cost more than 50 DZD a liter.

BY TRAIN:

Algerian railways are operated by SNTF; the trains and lines are being modernised. Ten comfortable high-speed trains named Autorail were bought, two of them are in operation. Tickets can not be bought on-line, only at the train stations, prices are quite moderate but more expensive than buses or taxis but in return you will have more comfort and enjoy wonderful landscapes.

Main routes:

  • Algiers to Oran, the train takes 4 hours and departs each day at 15:00 from Algiers Central Station and arrives in Oran at 19:30, 2nd Class: DA 1 000, 1st Class: DA 1 500.
  • Algiers to Annaba, on this route there’s a only a slow and less comfortable nighttrain, departing each day at 20:45 and taking all the night for the way to Annaba. As an alternative you can catch the daytrain to Constantine and take from there a cheap taxi to Annaba.
  • Algiers to Constantine departing each day at 06:45 and arriving in Constantine at 13:30, make sure that you get a window seat because the train will take you through the scenic kabilyan mountains and wonderful landscapes, 2nd Class: DA 1 200, 1st Class: DA 1 800.

EAT:

Algerian food is delicious. Note that some French dishes are variations from it.

  • Fettate (Sahara speciality, in Tamanrasset)
  • Taguella (bread of sand, a nomad speciality)
  • Couscous (steamed semolina with sauce containing meat and/or potatoes, carrots, courgette, and chick peas)
  • Buseluf (cooked lambs head)
  • Dowara (stew of stomach and intestines with courgette & chick peas)
  • Chorba (a meaty soup)
  • Rechta (hand made spaghetti, usually served with a clear chicken broth, potatoes & chick peas)
  • Chakchouka (normally, it has green peppers, onions and tomatoes; egg may be added)
  • Mechoui (charcoal grilled lamb)
  • Algerian pizza
  • Tajine (stew)
  • Mhadjeb

Desserts and snacks:

  • Qalb El Louz (dessert containing almonds)
  • Baklawa (almond cakes drenched in honey)
  • Ktayef (a kind of baked vermicelli, filled with almonds and drenched in sugar, syrup, and honey)

DRINK:

Algeria produces a selection of wine (not in big volume) and also beer. Algeria was once famous for its high quality wines. The new production is also of very high quality, particularly the red wine. Locally produced beer is also of a very high standard. Algeria is a majority Muslim country, so you do not find alcohol sold everywhere, but it is not hard to find it. Wine and alcoholic drinks are sold in the few bar restaurants in the big cities, better hotels, and night clubs. Some bar/restaurants can be found in nice parks, so if you are in a nice wooded park, look for the restaurants. The fast food restaurants that are open and affordable to the public do not sell beer, and the coffee shops do not sell alcohol. If you visit Algiers or coastal cities, there are fish restaurants in almost every fishing port, the fishing is traditional and the fish sold is very fresh; usually, these restaurants sell alcohol but you have to ask (do not expect to see it, some times it is on the menu, some times not).

Finally, you can buy your own bottle of Algerian wine to take home in discreet shops that sell alcoholic drinks. It is better to buy it at the Algiers airport, though expect to pay €15 per bottle. In smaller towns, buying alcoholic drinks can be challenging; you usually find them at the edge of the towns in sketchy areas and the conditions in which the alcohol was kept are sometimes questionable. Some Muslims drink but they consider it a sin. It is in private but socially. If someone invites you into his home and does not offer alcohol, he expects you not to be drunk or smell of alcohol, and does not expect you to bring your own bottle or even discuss drinking alcohol in front of his wife and children.

For housing, it really is not difficult, as there are luxury hotels and cheap ones throughout the country. The price of a beautiful deluxe room for a couple costs between €150-250 per day, as there are rooms from €10 to €45 for low budget tourists. Many services are available in luxury hotels, such as the cafeteria, bar, restaurant, nightclub, pool. During the summer season from June 15 to August 31, many owners rent houses and cottages on the Mediterranean Sea from Port Say (Marsa Ben M’hidi) in El-Kala. Prices vary depending on the number of pieces, usually €700-3000 per month, electricity included, but it is best to book in advance through an acquaintance or a travel agency. Also, many Algerian use internet ads: bids are sometimes interesting, but it is always best to send a loved one to visit the place before paying money. There is also the complex Meskoutine Hammam (spa, pool, etc.) which is located near a waterfall from which flows a source of hot water at 98 °C (208 °F). This is the second hottest in the world after the geyser in Iceland. The price, depending on the number of rooms in the bungalow, varies between 1500 and 3000 DA per day.
**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Algeria
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Notre-Dame d’Afriquel
Location: Algiers, Algeria
Notre Dame d'Afrique (Our Lady of Africa) is a Roman Catholic basilica in Algiers, Algeria.

It was Louis-Antoine-Augustin Pavy, who served as the Bishop of Algiers from 1846 to 1866, who paved the way for its construction. The basilica was inaugurated in 1872, after fourteen years of construction. It was founded by Charles Lavigerie. Its architect, Jean-Eugène Fromageau, who had been appointed the chief architect for ecclesiastical buildings in French Algeria in 1859, employed a Neo-Byzantine style. Its floor plan is unusual as the choir is situated on the southeast instead of the usual east side of the building.

The basilica contains 46 stained glass windows installed in the 19th century. They were blown out during a bombing of the area in April 1943 and have been restored twice since the end of World War II.

The basilica was damaged by the 2003 Boumerdès earthquake. A reconstruction project was initiated by Archbishop Henri Teissier in 2003, but work on the project didn't start until the spring of 2007. The total cost of restoration was 5.1 million euros.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notre-Dame_d%27Afrique
Name: Botanical Garden Hamma
Location: Algiers, Algeria
The Test Garden of Hamma, (French: Jardin d'Essai du Hamma) is a 58-hectare (140-acre) botanical garden of gardens and 20 hectares (49 acres) of arboretum located in the Mohamed Belouizdad (formerly Hamma-Anassers) district of Algiers. It was established in 1832.

Auguste Hardy was named director of the Botanical Garden in 1842. Many animal species were introduced to the garden at that time, and it expanded several times. As well as the animal and vegetable produce, industry relating to new technology occupied a lot of space, and employed a lot of people.

Between 1848 and 1867 the garden expanded several times, until it arrived at its current configuration. In 1860, a lake was created and an exterior boulevard constructed. The garden was renamed the Acclimatization Garden (French: Jardin d'Acclimatation) in 1861. In 1867, an estimated 8,214 species could be found in the garden.

It is now home to the Algerian National Institute of Agronomical Research. There are currently an estimated 1,200 different species of plant in the garden.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Botanical_Garden_Hamma
Name: Martyrs’ Memorial
Location: Algiers, Algeria
The Maqam Echahid (English: Martyrs' Memorial) is an iconic concrete monument commemorating the Algerian war for independence. The monument was opened in 1982 on the 20th anniversary of Algeria's independence. It is fashioned in the shape of three standing palm leaves which shelter the "Eternal Flame" beneath. At the edge of each palm leaf stands a statue of a soldier, each representing a stage of Algeria's struggle.

The Martyrs Memorial is located on the heights of Algiers, in the municipality of El Madania, west of the Bois des arcades, east of Diar el Mahçoul and north of the plaza shopping center Riadh El Feth. It overlooks the neighborhood of Hamma (common Belouizdad) and the Botanical Garden Hamma (known as Jardin d'essai) in the north. The monument has been erected on the site of an ancient military fort.

Consisting of three stylized fins that join mid-height, the concrete monument built by the Canadian company Lavalin, based on a model produced in the Fine Art Institute of Algiers, under the leadership of Bashir Yelles, reaches a height of 92 metres (302 ft).

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martyrs%27_Memorial,_Algiers
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN ALGERIA / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
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...WHO ARE WE?

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…WHO ARE WE?
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My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

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We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

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