ARGENTINA

ARGENTINA

ARGENTINA

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Name: Perito Moreno Glacier
Location: Santa Cruz Province, Argentina
The Perito Moreno Glacier is a glacier located in the Los Glaciares National Park in southwest Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. It is one of the most important tourist attractions in the Argentinian Patagonia.

The 250 km2 (97 sq mi) ice formation, 30 km (19 mi) in length, is one of 48 glaciers fed by the Southern Patagonian Ice Field located in the Andes system shared with Chile. This ice field is the world's third largest reserve of fresh water.

The Perito Moreno Glacier, located 78 kilometres (48 mi) from El Calafate, was named after the explorer Francisco Moreno, a pioneer who studied the region in the 19th century and played a major role in defending the territory of Argentina in the conflict surrounding the international border dispute with Chile.

The glacier is unusual in that it is advancing, while most glaciers worldwide are retreating. The reason remains debated by glaciologists. The terminus of the Perito Moreno Glacier is 5 km (3.1 mi) wide, with an average height of 74 m (240 ft) above the surface of the water of Argentino Lake, in Argentina.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perito_Moreno_Glacier
Name: Iguazú Falls
Location: Misiones, Argentina
Iguazú Falls or Iguaçu Falls are waterfalls of the Iguazu River on the border of the Argentine province of Misiones and the Brazilian state of Paraná. Together, they make up the largest waterfall system in the world. The falls divide the river into the upper and lower Iguazu. The Iguazu River rises near the heart of the city of Curitiba. For most of its course, the river flows through Brazil; however, most of the falls are on the Argentine side. Below its confluence with the San Antonio River, the Iguazu River forms the boundary between Argentina and Brazil.

The name "Iguazú" comes from the Guarani or Tupi words "y" [ɨ], meaning "water", and "ûasú "[waˈsu], meaning "big". Legend has it that a deity planned to marry a beautiful woman named Naipí, who fled with her mortal lover Tarobá in a canoe. In a rage, the deity sliced the river, creating the waterfalls and condemning the lovers to an eternal fall. The first European to record the existence of the falls was the Spanish Conquistador Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca in 1541.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iguazu_Falls
Name: La Boca
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
La Boca is a neighborhood, or barrio of the Argentine capital, Buenos Aires. It retains a strong Italian flavour, with many of its early settlers being from the city of Genoa. In 1882, after a lengthy general strike, La Boca seceded from Argentina, and the rebels raised the Genoese flag, which was immediately torn down personally by then President Julio Argentino Roca.

Among sports fans, Boca is best known for being the home of world-renowned football club Boca Juniors. The club plays their home matches in the Estadio Alberto J. Armando.

La Boca is a popular destination for tourists visiting Argentina, with its colourful houses and pedestrian street, the Caminito, where tango artists perform and tango-related memorabilia is sold. Other attractions include the La Ribera theatre, many tango clubs and Italian taverns. The actual area visited by tourists is only a few blocks long and has been built up for tourism very actively over the last few years. Outside this tourist area, it is a fairly poor neighborhood that has had many regular occurrences of petty crimes reported.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Boca
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COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
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FACTS:
Official Languages: Spanish
Currency: Argentina Peso (ARS)
Time zone: ART (Argentina Time) (UTC−3)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +54
Local / up-to-date in Buenos Aires (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Argentina travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Argentina, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
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The official currency of Argentina is the peso (ISO: code: ARS), denoted by the symbol “$”. It is divided into 100 centavos. Coins come in 5, 10, 25, 50 centavos and 1 and 2 peso denominations. Banknotes are issued in values of 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500 and 1000 pesos. Be prepared to receive small change in the form of golosinas (candies/sweets), especially in Chinese supermarkets.

Since 1969 thirteen zeroes have been dropped (a factor of ten trillion), the peso has been revalued again and again, and its name changed. The official exchange rate hovered around AR$3 = US$1 from 2002 to 2008, dipped to about AR$4 = US$1 from 2009 to 2011 and reached AR$6 in Nov 2013. In December 2015, all currency restrictions were lifted. Due to the history of inflation and revaluing, Wikivoyage is no longer posting prices in pesos, and any price information more than a year old must be treated with a lot of caution.

BANKS:

Banks are generally open from 10:00 to 15:00 and only on weekdays.

ATMs:

ATMs are the most convenient but on the other hand quite expensive source of cash. In general, ATMs in Argentina charge very high additional fee when using a credit card, independently of your credit card conditions at home. ATMs should be used only in banks or ATMs that acted as the banks’ branches. Just like in most cities, independent ATMs (not affiliated with any bank) are considered less safe.

Most ATMs strictly limit withdrawals on foreign cards. With RedBrou, you may be able to get out only AR$3,000 per day with a fee of around AR$200, which will be added to your withdrawal amount (Mar 2018). The Link ATMs often only allow withdrawals of AR$1,000 with a fee of AR$120, which makes it a staggering 12% fee just for withdrawing money, and that is in addition to the foreign currency fee you have to pay with your bank back home. So, you are better off with RedBrou, but plan to visit the ATM often or hunt around for a more relaxed limit. Apparently, the Citibank multipurpose ATMs are the only ones allowing withdrawals over AR$3,000 per day (probably up to the limit of your card).

Sometimes the machines also dispense US dollars for international bank cards that are members of the Cirrus and PLUS networks. Visitors from Brazil can find many Banco Itaú agencies all over the city.

MONEY EXCHANGE:

Cash exchange rates for US dollars are very competitive, and it may be more advantageous to simply bring a large sum of US currency, considering the high fees of ATMs. It is easy to stack up US dollars in Uruguay because its ATMs do allow US dollar withdrawals at no or a low fee. However, of course then you will also have to watch this money all the time. So, a mix of both, US dollars and ATM, is probably the best.

Exchange rates at official Bureau de Change in Argentina are very competitive with rates being barely 1% off the official interbank rate. Also, many of the larger banks (like Banco de la Nación Argentina) exchange money at competitive rates, even euros. As of 2019, expect to lose 10-20% when buying Argentenian pesos with Chilean pesos as most banks do not exchange them. The bigger the city the easier it gets to exchange money, even the oddest currencies—see Buenos Aires#Buy. You might need a passport with banks though.

Black market currency dealers, called arbolitos (“little trees”) and operating from cuevas (“caves”), can be found yelling “Cambio”, with Florida Street in Buenos Aires being particularly notorious. These so-called “blue dollar” (dólar blue) currency exchanges became popular in the past when the peso was pegged at an artificially high level and the government heavily restricted currency exchange. However, in 2015 the government lifted most of the currency restrictions and unified the exchange rates. Accordingly, the blue dollar is no longer recommended as an exchange option, since you can get pesos anywhere with a similar rate. If you choose to go down this route anyway, remember that it is illegal, so take all possible precautions to avoid getting ripped off and remember that your money may be confiscated if you are busted by the police.

Nevertheless, hostel owners will sometimes be willing to exchange US dollars, since they will save the dollars for themselves instead of their devaluing local currency. Still check the notes received and the current and up-to-date rates.

CREDIT CARDS:

Credit cards are used less commonly in Argentina than in the USA or Europe. Many businesses in the city accept them and you can expect any major chain – supermarkets, fast food, clothing stores, etc. – to also accept them. The standard 10% tip in restaurant is often expected to be paid in cash, even when you pay the bill by credit card. Bear in mind, tipping is only expected when the establishment does not already charge you for “cubiertos” (literally, utensils. In practice it means “table service”).

If you use a debit or credit card, the checkout operator in places like supermarkets will often require you to present both your card and a form of identification such as a drivers’ licence. Present both simultaneously at checkout and with confidence. A lack of confidence will lead to a request for your passport as identification. For larger purchases such as long-distance bus tickets you will need to present your passport and your credit card. Although this makes shopping difficult, do try to keep your passport in a location such as a hotel-room safe.

PIN cards have become the most common ones and should be accepted anywhere, as well as magnetic band cards. PINs should be accepted but if not, the shop attendant will ask you to sign the invoice. Contactless credit cards are not commonly accepted as of Nov 2016.

BY BUS:

Argentina boasts an outstanding short and long-distance bus network. Since regional train service is limited and plane tickets are more expensive, bus travel is the most common way to travel from city to city within Argentina. It is not as cheap as it was before, with about US$4-5 for each hour of travelling (Puerto Iguazú to Buenos Aires about US$100).

In Buenos Aires, a city bus is called a colectivo or bondi while a long distance, intercity bus is called a micro or omnibus; this is not always true though, usage varies somewhat in provincial areas.. The hub of this network is definitely Buenos Aires’ Terminal de Omnibus de Retiro; it has up to 2,000 bus arrivals and departures per day, and multiple companies serve most destinations. Buses arrive and depart from a total of 75 platforms, and in order to buy your ticket you will have to choose between about 200 ticket booths situated on the upper level of the terminal.

The more expensive buses generally offer high-quality service, and for distances longer than 200 km, it is common to have food served on board. There is generally a good amount of legroom, and many buses have seats that recline horizontally into beds (called camas) making them a lot like travelling business class on a plane. The best category with completely reclining seats is normally called cama suite, but other names such as tutto leto, ejecutivo , cama vip or salon real are also in use.

Somewhat cheaper seats only recline partially (semi-camas), or not at all (servicio común). Every service belongs to one of five official comfort classes with minimum requirements that are prescribed by law in order to facilitate comparisons. The better buses will provide everything you need, while for the lower categories it may be a good idea to take drinks and food with you, as well as toilet paper and ear plugs. If the trip is really long e.g. more than 12 hours it’s definitelly better to spend a few more bucks and pay for a better bus service. If travelling with a large bag or suitcase bring a handful of coins to tip the porter that heaves your pack in and out of the taxi and bus.

Remember that, although buses usually arrive at their destination a little late, they almost always leave on time. Do not think that the relaxed approach carries over to bus departure times!

More information on bus schedules and fares is available on the webpages of the online ticket resellers Plataforma 10, Central de Pasajes. To buy tickets and to really have a choice to different bus companies you may visit Ticket Online or VoyEnBus . For buses departing or arriving in Buenos Aires, you can consult the webpages of the Terminal Retiro in Buenos Aires. A second bus terminal in Buenos Aires is situated in the Liniers neighbourhood, but it is smaller and less accessible than the one in Retiro.

For city buses in Buenos Aires you should check BA Cómo Llego (In English, also an app for smartphones) and Omnilineas (in English).

BY TRAIN:

The history of rail transport in Argentina is one of many ups and downs. While in the 19th century the rail network rivaled that of the US or many European countries in density, speed and quality as befitted a nation among the richest in the world, the declining fortunes of Argentina in the 20th century hit the railway, too. The railways were nationalized during Juan Domingo Perón’s first term and remained state-owned until they were privatized under the government of Carlos Menem. However, the railways have since made yet another U-turn and a new state-owned railway was created in 2015. The government has promoted the re-establishment of long-distance passenger trains, although most lines still operate at a low frequency (one or two departures weekly). The rail network is very limited, and intercity buses offer better service and faster rides. Train fares are very cheap, often only a quarter of the bus fare. The website is a bit hard to navigate and Spanish only.

Local travel in the Buenos Aires province is by bus and by local trains, with fast trains being the quickest way to get through the city’s traffic. The three largest train terminals in Buenos Aires are Retiro, Constitucion and Once. Retiro is a group of three train stations alongside each other with the main long distance bus (or “micro”) terminal behind the furthest of the train terminals (from the city centre).

One of the major long distance train operators is Trenes Argentinos, which departs from Retiro (Buenos Aires) to Rosario, Córdoba and Tucumán, and from Constitución (Buenos Aires) to Bahía Blanca. See also Satélite Ferroviario for up-to-date information on trains and services (in Spanish). Tickets can be bought online with a 5% discount and with credit card. Even though, it does not allow for the selection of a foreign passport ID when buying a ticket, you can enter your number (and letters) under DNI, which will be accepted in the train. For getting the needed online account, you cannot enter letters for your ID number, but just put anything, since you will be asked anew for each purchased connection.

An amazing (but quite expensive) train ride is the Tren a las nubes (Train to the Clouds) in the northwestern province of Salta, but some people may get altitude sickness. This service, which has experienced suspensions, recommenced in August 2008. The train line no longer crosses the border into Chile.

BY PLANE:

Domestic flights are available within Argentina, but tickets are pricey, and most domestic flights pass through Buenos Aires’ domestic airport Aeroparque Jorge Newbery. The main carriers are Aerolíneas Argentinas, Aerolíneas Austral (a subsidiary of Aerolíneas Argentinas) and LATAM Argentina. Aerolíneas Argentinas’ subsidiary Austral, shares its parent’s fleet, and tickets for both can be booked at the same office. The prices for tickets are double for non-residents, so be careful with publicized ticket prices.

An exception to passing through Buenos Aires for domestic flights is Aerolineas Argentinas’ “Great Circle Route”, going both ways Saturdays, Tuesdays and Thursdays BA-Bariloche-Mendoza-Salta-Iguazu-BA (and reverse on another flight both days).

If you fly on your international trip to Argentina with Aerolíneas you sometimes can get discounts on domestic flights. Sometimes you even get free flights with your international ticket but keep in mind that you probably already paid for this with the inflated price of your international ticket.

Always plan to arrive at your final destination before your flight home 2 or 3 days in advance, as Argentina, like most Latin American countries, experiences more delays and cancellations in travel than most areas of the world.

Additional smaller carriers offering domestic flights are:

  • Andes Líneas Aéreas, toll-free: 0810 777-2633 (in country only). Began in 2006 with regular flights between Buenos Aires and Salta. Since then they now serve several major cities in Argentina. (updated Apr 2018)
  • Avianca Argentina. Connects Buenos Aires to Rosario, Mar del Plata and Santa Fe in ATR 72 aircraft. Plans are underway to expand service to additional cities. (updated Apr 2018)
  • Fly Bondi. (updated Aug 2018)
  • Líneas Aéreas del Estado (LADE), +54 11 5353-2387, toll-free: 0810 810-5233 (in country only). State owned airline, operated by the Air Force, serving Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires Province and Entre Rios in the north and Chubut, Rio Negro, Santa Cruz and Tierra Fuego provinces in Patagonia with Saab 340B aircraft. (updated Apr 2018)
  • Norwegian Argentina. Subsidiary brand of Norway’s Norwegian Air Shuttle to provide domestic flights from Buenos Aires and Cordoba to Mendoza, Puerto Iguazú, Neuquén, Salta and San Carlos Bariloche. Plans are underway to include international flights to Singapore via Perth from Buenos Aires and to include additional domestic and international connections out of Buenos Aires. (updated Oct 2018)

BY CAR:

Car rental is readily available throughout Argentina, though it is a bit expensive compared with other forms of transportation. Travelling by car allows you to visit locations that are hard to reach by public transportation. Patagonia, in the South of Argentina, is a popular driving location among tourists due to the breathtaking views across many miles of open land.

Argentina generally recognizes valid drivers’ licences from foreign jurisdictions. Drivers must be over 21. The rental companies will charge the renters credit card $6000 to be used in the event of an accident. They cancel this charge when the car is returned. On the rutas, in the provinces bordering other countries, the police frequently stop cars at controles policiales (“police checkpoints”) to check insurance and registration papers and drivers’ licences. They do not stop all cars, though; when you come to a control policial, drive slowly and you will usually be waved through without stopping. Near provincial borders, these controles may also involve inspection of the trunk for contraband and a mandatory two peso fee for “disinfection” or removing insects from the car’s underside by driving it over a mechanical sprayer that either sprays water or does nothing. The police have been known to set up roadblocks and demand bribes for passage, particularly around the city of Buenos Aires.

Traffic regulations in Argentina are generally the same as in Europe and the U.S., but the locals often ignore the regulations. On roads and highways it’s mandatory to have car lights on, even during daytime.

Maximum speed: 60 km/h in the city, 40 km/h on side roads and 100 km/h to 130 km/h on roads outside the city as well as on highways. There are frequent speed controls. However speed limits and lane markings are universally ignored, and running red lights is common. Most drivers treat stop signs, octagonal red signs reading PARE, as though they were “yield” signs, though some drivers ignore them completely. Within cities surrounding Buenos Aires it is proper to honk at an impending intersection and the one who honks first has right of way. Right of way is determined somewhat haphazardly by a combination of vehicle size and who arrives first. Make sure you are thoroughly confident in your driving skills before attempting to drive in Argentina.

Highways are limited to the areas around large cities. Most of the country is connected by paved unlit two-lane roads (rutas) shared by buses, cars, and large trucks. Some places are accessible only by gravel or dirt roads. Indeed, some main roads in southern Argentina are unsealed, leading to 4×4 vehicles being more popular. This is particularly the case in the south. It is important to travel with a good map ( e.g. Argentina Waterproof Road Map from World Mapping Project) and to be well informed about your route distances, road conditions and the estimated travel time. In addition to a good map the website of cochera andina publishes useful information on more than 120 routes in Argentina.

The current cost of gasoline in central and southern Argentina is approximately 6 pesos per litre. In many small towns, particularly in the north, they may ration gasoline to ensure they have enough to sell until the next refuelling truck arrives, in which case you will only be allowed to buy 30 pesos worth of fuel at a time. It’s advisable to fill your tank at regular intervals when the opportunity arises. In the Andes, the gasoline consumption of non-turbo charged engines increases due to the altitude.

EAT:

Argentinian breakfasts are somewhat light compared to what those from English-speaking countries are accustomed to. Typically, it consists of a hot drink (coffee, tea, milk) with some toast, medialunas (croissants, literally “halfmoons”) or bread.

Hotels typically provide a free buffet consisting of coffee, tea, drinkable yogurt, assorted pastries and toast, fruit and perhaps cereal. These kinds of breakfasts are also readily available in the many cafes.

Lunch is a big meal in Argentina, typically taken in the early afternoon. Lunch is so big because dinner is not until late: 20:30 to 21:00 at the earliest, more commonly at 22:00 or even later. Most restaurants do not serve food until then except for pastries or small ham-and-cheese toasted sandwiches (tostados), for afternoon tea 18:00-20:00. Tea is the one meal that is rarely skipped. A few cafés do offer heartier fare all day long, but don’t expect anything more substantial than pizza or a milanesa (breaded meat fillets) or a lomito (steak sandwiches) outside of normal Argentine mealtimes. Dinner is usually eaten at 22:00 and typically consists of appetizers, a main course, and desserts.

North Americans should beware that Argentinians use the term “entrée” to refer to appetizers. This is common outside of North America but can surprise some Canadians and most Americans. In Argentina the main dish is a “plato principal”.

The appetizers in Argentina typically consist of empanadas (baked pastries with a meat filling), chorizo or morcilla (meat or blood sausage), and assortments of achuras (entrails). For a main dish, there is usually bife de chorizo (sirloin or New York Strip steak) and various types of salads. Dessert is often a custard with dulce de leche and whipped cream topping.

Beef is a prominent component of the Argentine diet, and Argentine beef is world-famous for good reason. Argentina and Uruguay are the top 2 countries in meat per capita consumption in the world. Definitely check out Argentine barbecue: asado, sometimes also called parrillada, because it is made on a parrilla, or grill. Food in Argentina is virtually synonymous with beef. The beef is some of the best in the world, and there are many different cuts of meat. Lomo (tenderloin) and bife de chorizo are excellent. “Costillas” (ribs) is considered by locals the real “asado” meat cut and is very tasty. North Americans will see that costillas are different to those at home. Argentinians cut ribs perpendicular to the bone. Having a parrillada dinner is one of the best ways to experience Argentine cuisine; preferably with a bottle of wine and a good amount of salads. In some popular areas, parrilladas are available from small buffets, or street carts and barbecue trailers. Skewers and steak sandwiches can then be purchased to takeaway.

Given that a large portion of Argentines are of Italian, Spanish and French descent, such fare is very widespread and of high quality; pizzerias and specialized restaurants are very common. A convention observed in Argentina is to treat the pasta and sauce as separate items, with each charged separately.

Cafés, bakeries, and ice-cream shops (heladerías) are very popular. Inexpensive and high-quality snacks can be found in most commercial areas, and many have outdoor seating areas. Empanadas (turnovers) containing meats, cheeses, or many other fillings can be bought cheaply from restaurants or lunch counters. The Alfajor is a must try snack of a two cookies (biscuits) with a dulce de leche filling and can be purchased at any local kiosco.

Smoking is now prohibited in all of Buenos Aires’ restaurants and all of Mendoza’s restaurants. In most cities, it’s forbidden in all public buildings (cafés, shops, banks, bus stations, etc.), so it’s better to ask before smoking anywhere.

Signature/national dishes:

  • Asado
  • Empanada (baked pastries with a meat, cheese and/or vegetable filling)
  • Milanesa (breaded meat fillets)
  • Humita
  • Chorizo (sausage) and Choripan (with bread)
  • Tarta de Jamón y Queso (baked pastry crust with ham and cheese filling)
  • Guiso Criollo – with meat, vegetables and fruit

Desserts and snacks:

  • Dulce de leche
  • Alfajores
  • Helado
  • Flan con Dulce de Leche
  • Torta de Ricotta
  • Facturas

DRINK:

Yerba mate (pronounced in two syllables, ‘MAH-tae’) is a traditional Argentine herbal drink, prepared in a hollowed-out gourd which is passed around in a social setting and drunk through a metal straw. Although usually drunk hot, mate can also be served cold, usually known as “tereré”; the version that is preferred in Paraguay. Mate contains less caffeine than coffee, but contains other vitamins and minerals that give it a stimulating effect, particularly to those who are not used to it. It is naturally rather bitter, so it’s not uncommon to add sugar, though it’s polite to ask before adding sugar to it. The drinking of mate with friends is an important social ritual in Argentina. The informal tea ceremony is led by a “cebador” or server and people arrange themselves in a “rueda” or wheel.

Argentina is renowned for its excellent selection of wine. The most popular being Mendoza which is rated among the worlds most popular regions due to its high altitude, volcanic soils and proximity to the Andes Mountains. The terrain seems to complement the European grape varietals with interesting notes not present when produced in other climates, this allows the Argentine wine to be positioned in a league of its own. The best way to experience and understand the selection of Argentine varietals is one of the many tasting events.

The legal drinking age is officially 18, although most establishments will serve anyone approximately 16 or older. Most restaurants serve a broad range of liquors. Beer is offered in drought form in a chopp (small glass) or served in bottles or cans, and is typically a light, easily drinkable lager. The most popular locally made brands of beer are Quilmes, Isenbeck, Schneider and Brahma (although it’s Brazilian). Widely-available imports include Warsteiner, Heineken, Budweiser and Corona. There are now many small pubs and bars in Buenos Aires that brew beer on premises, but most of these offer a poor quality product compared to what is widely available in parts of Europe and the USA. In the Buenos Aires area, the Buller Brewing Company in Recoleta and the Antares Brewery in Mar del Plata offer excellent handcrafted English-style ales. Ask if there are “cervezas artesanales”, locally hand crafted beers.

Fernet is widely consumed by Argentinians, especially in Córdoba, Santa Fe and Buenos Aires. It came from Italy, and is a very bitter drink made from herbs, with 40% alcohol and dark brown in colour. Due to its bitter taste, it is usually mixed with Coke (served in bars, pubs, clubs), and if you go to an Argentinian house they will have Fernet and Coke to offer you. Also, Fernet is usually served as a digestif after a meal, but may also be enjoyed with coffee and espresso, or mixed into coffee and espresso drinks. It may be enjoyed at room temperature or with ice.

Cider (sidra) is the typical drink at celebrations, especially at Christmas. On other important occasions such as birthdays, anniversaries or weddings, sidra is the drink chosen for the toast.

Cafés often have fresh-squeezed fruit juices, which is otherwise hard to find.

A wide range of accommodation possibilities are available in Buenos Aires and the rest of the country, from student hostels to homey bed and breakfasts to trendy boutique hotels in the city to luxurious palaces and modern five-star hotels. There are also many beautiful lake-side lodges in Patagonia, and fabulous regional farms (estancias) outside the cities.

Many vacation cabañas (cabins or weekend houses) are available for short-term rent directly from the owners in the mountains, seaside, and in rural areas. Drive around and look for signs saying alquiler (“rental”), or check the classified section of any major newspaper.

Argentina is a vast country and camping is possible at many places (free or including amenities), especially near the beach. In addition, many villages and towns offer inexpensive “municipal camping”. However, consider that many grounds are private property, so you should not camp here. Consult OpenStreetMap, which many mobile Apps like OsmAnd and MAPS.ME use, to find places which have been tagged by other people as possible camping sites.

The fashion and art scenes are booming. Buenos Aires’ signature European-South American style overflows with unique art pieces, art deco furniture, and antiques. Local fashion designers, who are becoming a source of inspiration for the U.S. and European high-end markets, compose their collections based on lots of leather, wools, woven fabrics and delicate laces with a gaucho twist. At times, the exchange rate can present good value for international tourists.

Fashionable clothing and leather products can be found in most commercial areas; jackets, boots and shoes are easily available. However, Buenos Aires has a relatively mild climate, so truly cold-weather gear is harder to find here. Long coats or heavy gloves may not be in stock; similarly, jeans and other basics have a thin construction compared with those in cooler countries. The Andes regions and Patagonia are considerably colder in the winter, so thick clothing is much easier to find here.

Electronics are not cheap, as they are subject to heavy import tariffs. The price of music, books, and movies lags slightly behind changes in the exchange rate and can offer a bargain if the volatile exchange rates are in your favour.

Most free-standing shops in Buenos Aires are open 10:00-20:00 on weekdays, and some of them also Saturdays and Sundays, depending on what area of the city they are in. Enclosed malls, however, set their own hours, and are also open on the weekends.

Most places outside of the city of Buenos Aires, where most stores remain open during a siesta, still observe a siesta from approximately noon until 16:00; almost all businesses are closed during this time. The precise closing hours vary from store to store, according to the preferences of the owner. Shops and offices generally open again in the evening until 21:00 or 22:00.

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Argentina
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Name: Perito Moreno Glacier
Location: Santa Cruz Province, Argentina
The Perito Moreno Glacier is a glacier located in the Los Glaciares National Park in southwest Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. It is one of the most important tourist attractions in the Argentinian Patagonia.

The 250 km2 (97 sq mi) ice formation, 30 km (19 mi) in length, is one of 48 glaciers fed by the Southern Patagonian Ice Field located in the Andes system shared with Chile. This ice field is the world's third largest reserve of fresh water.

The Perito Moreno Glacier, located 78 kilometres (48 mi) from El Calafate, was named after the explorer Francisco Moreno, a pioneer who studied the region in the 19th century and played a major role in defending the territory of Argentina in the conflict surrounding the international border dispute with Chile.

The glacier is unusual in that it is advancing, while most glaciers worldwide are retreating. The reason remains debated by glaciologists. The terminus of the Perito Moreno Glacier is 5 km (3.1 mi) wide, with an average height of 74 m (240 ft) above the surface of the water of Argentino Lake, in Argentina.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perito_Moreno_Glacier
Name: Iguazú Falls
Location: Misiones, Argentina
Iguazú Falls or Iguaçu Falls are waterfalls of the Iguazu River on the border of the Argentine province of Misiones and the Brazilian state of Paraná. Together, they make up the largest waterfall system in the world. The falls divide the river into the upper and lower Iguazu. The Iguazu River rises near the heart of the city of Curitiba. For most of its course, the river flows through Brazil; however, most of the falls are on the Argentine side. Below its confluence with the San Antonio River, the Iguazu River forms the boundary between Argentina and Brazil.

The name "Iguazú" comes from the Guarani or Tupi words "y" [ɨ], meaning "water", and "ûasú "[waˈsu], meaning "big". Legend has it that a deity planned to marry a beautiful woman named Naipí, who fled with her mortal lover Tarobá in a canoe. In a rage, the deity sliced the river, creating the waterfalls and condemning the lovers to an eternal fall. The first European to record the existence of the falls was the Spanish Conquistador Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca in 1541.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iguazu_Falls
Name: La Boca
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
La Boca is a neighborhood, or barrio of the Argentine capital, Buenos Aires. It retains a strong Italian flavour, with many of its early settlers being from the city of Genoa. In 1882, after a lengthy general strike, La Boca seceded from Argentina, and the rebels raised the Genoese flag, which was immediately torn down personally by then President Julio Argentino Roca.

Among sports fans, Boca is best known for being the home of world-renowned football club Boca Juniors. The club plays their home matches in the Estadio Alberto J. Armando.

La Boca is a popular destination for tourists visiting Argentina, with its colourful houses and pedestrian street, the Caminito, where tango artists perform and tango-related memorabilia is sold. Other attractions include the La Ribera theatre, many tango clubs and Italian taverns. The actual area visited by tourists is only a few blocks long and has been built up for tourism very actively over the last few years. Outside this tourist area, it is a fairly poor neighborhood that has had many regular occurrences of petty crimes reported.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Boca
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
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...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

Global Immigration Leader, Big 4

“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

Internal stakeholder, Big 4

“Manny is a big reason why the move from (external provider) to the UK firm’s passport and visa provision has been so smooth. He’s an extremely likeable honest hard working guy who takes his role very seriously. We’re very fortunate to have him leading our dedicated team”

External client, Private practice

“Most of my contact was with Manpreet Singh Johal. He did the best job someone could imagine. Extraordinary service from his side.”

Team member, Big 4

“Working on two priority accounts is naturally pressurised especially where he has also been responsible for billing on both accounts; yet Manny delivers every time and this I believe is an exceptional quality.”

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