BAHRAIN

BAHRAIN

BAHRAIN

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– No current scheduled consular closures.
CONSULAR CLOSURES
THE EMBASSY OF BAHRAIN IN WASHINGTON DC IS CLOSED:
No current scheduled consular closures
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Qal’at al-Bahrain
Location: Manama, Bahrain
The Qal'at al-Bahrain, also known as the Bahrain Fort or Portuguese Fort, is an archaeological site located in Bahrain, on the Arabian Peninsula. Archaeological excavations carried out since 1954 have unearthed antiquities from an artificial mound of 12 m (39 ft) height containing seven stratified layers, created by various occupants from 2300 BC up to the 18th century, including Kassites, Greeks, Portuguese and Persians. It was once the capital of the Dilmun civilization and was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2005.

The fort and the tell Qal'at al-Bahrain is built on, are located on the Bahrain island, on the northern seashore. On a clear day it is also seen from Saar. It stands like a "sentinel" near Manama, the capital of Bahrain; it is 6 km (4 mi) away from Manama on the fertile north coast. The tell is the largest in the Persian Gulf region and was built close to the port and by reclamation of seashore land.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qal%27at_al-Bahrain
Name: Bahrain National Museum
Location: Manama, Bahrain
The Bahrain National Museum is the largest and one of the oldest public museums in Bahrain. It is constructed near the King Faisal Highway in Manama and opened in December 1988. The US$30 million museum complex covers 27,800 sq meters and consists of two buildings.

The museum possess a rich collection of Bahrain's ancient archaeological artifacts acquired since 1988, and covers nearly 5000 years of Bahrain's history. The complex includes three halls devoted to archaeology and the ancient civilisation of the Dilmun, while two other halls depict the culture and lifestyle of Bahrain's recent pre-industrial past. A notable exhibit is the Durand Stone, a long black basalt sculpture dating back to the Babylonian era.

In 1993, a further hall was opened, the Natural History Hall, focusing on the natural environment of Bahrain. This hall features specimens of Bahrain's flora and fauna. Among the exhibits in the ancient history section is an actual burial mound which was transported from its site in the desert and reassembled in the museum.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bahrain_National_Museum
Name: Al Fateh Grand Mosque
Location: Manama, Bahrain
The Al-Fateh Mosque (also known as Al-Fateh Islamic Center & Al Fateh Grand Mosque) is one of the largest mosques in the world, encompassing 6,500 square meters and having the capacity to accommodate over 7,000 worshippers at a time. The mosque was built by the late Sheikh Isa ibn Salman Al Khalifa in 1987 and was named after Ahmed Al Fateh, the founder of Bahrain. In 2006, Al-Fateh became the site of the National Library of Bahrain.

The mosque is the largest place of worship in Bahrain. It is located next to the King Faisal Highway in Juffair, which is a suburban neighborhood of Manama. The huge dome built on top of the Al-Fateh Mosque is constructed entirely of fibreglass. Weighing over 60 Megagrams (tonne), the dome is currently the world's largest fibreglass dome. The marble used in the floors is Italian and the chandelier is from Austria. The doors are made of teak wood from India. Throughout the mosque are calligraphy writings in a very old type of style called Bahrain.

The library of Ahmed Al-Fateh Islamic Center has around 7,000 books, some as old as 100 years or more.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Fateh_Grand_Mosque
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN BAHRAIN / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.
New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC
COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO BAHRAIN.
FACTS:
Official Languages: Arabic
Currency: Bahrain Dinar (BHD)
Time zone: AST (Arabia Standard Time) (UTC+3)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +973
Local / up-to-date weather in Manama (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Bahrain travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Bahrain, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO BAHRAIN.

The currency in Bahrain is the Bahraini dinar, denoted by the symbol ” .د.ب ” or “BD” (ISO code: BHD). It is divided into 1000 fils. One dinar is worth US$2.66, as the exchange rate is fixed, making this one of the world’s highest-valued currencies (second only to Kuwait). This can get some getting used to: that seemingly cheap BD 10 taxi ride is in fact almost US$27 and thus an extortionate rip-off.

The dinar is a fully convertible currency, and there are no restrictions on its import or export. Denominations for coins are 5 fils, 10 fils, 25 fils, 50 fils and 100 fils (500 fils coins are rarely seen, but are valid). Denominations for banknotes are 500 fils (BD 1/2), BD 1, BD 5, BD 10 and BD 20.

Being fixed to the US dollar means that it is effectively pegged to the Saudi riyal at 1:10. Saudi Riyals (SAR) are accepted almost everywhere at that rate, although odds are you’ll get your change in dinars and hotels may try to screw you out of a few percent. If coming in from KSA, there’s no reason to change your money, but do try to get rid of any excess dinars before you leave the country, as they’re hard to exchange elsewhere, even in Saudi Arabia.

BY TAXI:

The official rates start at BD 1 plus 0.200 fils per kilometer. In practice, though, meters are often “broken”, covered, missing or just ignored, and you’ll need to agree on fares in advance. Cabbies will often ask for ridiculous prices. Most taxis now use their meters. Rates vary from BD 3-5 for a ride within Manama.

The airport gives guidelines as to the official way of calculating taxi fares. An extra BD 2 will be added if you take a taxi waiting at the airport.

the whole taxis offer a good service but you do encounter some bandits. When travelling from the airport always use the white with red roof or London-style taxis. There is a rule if the meter is not used there is no charge; hold your ground on this and call the police, and the driver will cooperate very quickly with the correct fare for the trip.

Finding a taxi can be difficult, although major hotels and malls usually have a few waiting outside. Some privately owned companies operate in the kingdom, the most popular of which are:

  • Speedy Motor Service Radio-Meter Taxis SMS Radio-Meter Taxi is the oldest & most popular radio-meter taxi company in the Kingdom, and the most reliable. Advance booking of taxi is possible, and they operate a 24-hour service, 365 days a year. Call +973-17 682999
  • Bahrain Taxi Online Get meter taxi online within 10 minutes. Tel: +973-36688614
  • Bahrain Limo is the sister company of the transport giant “Saudi Bahraini Transport Company” (SABTCO) which provides luxurious bus and limousine services across the King Fahad Causeway.
  • Bahrain Taxi Group Radio taxi services with more than 973 taxi drivers driving orange and white cars equipped with radio meters and most of them with credit card devices. Booking online taxi services is available and can be applied by filling the form and with placing a call to call center +973 66966976.

However, there have been occasional reports of taxi drivers trying to charge overly expensive fares (like BD 50 for a short trip, when it should be BD 5), though they are generally rare. Sticking to the official taxi services is usually your best bet.

BY BUS:

There are also public buses that run to many parts of the island. Bus fares are low; English-language schedules and maps are available online.

For tourists the most important route is a1 (Airport-Manama). To get to the Bahrain Fort takeAa2 from airport via Manama and get out in Seef, from there walk 2 km to the fort.

BY CAR:

If planning on visiting several sites, consider renting a car. Prices are BD 10-20 per day, but allow you freedom to drive around the island.

If arriving by the bus at the Lulu centre parking, simply turn your back from the centre’s entrance, walk out of the parking, and you’ll find car rentals in the group of buildings across the road. A map or a GPS is strongly advised, as road signs can be scarce, and it is not too difficult to go from one part of the country and land up in another, though fortunately the country is small.

Speed limits are generally 50 km/h in the roads and 80-120 km/h in the highway. Fines for breaking the traffic law is pretty severe, though the rules are not always properly enforced.

EAT:

Bahrain has an impressive dining scene, with numerous restaurants to choose from. The main dining area is Adliya, where you can take your pick among numerous cafes, trendy lounges and restaurants.

Restaurants in Bahrain run the gamut for cheap stalls offering local food to fancy restaurants in fancy hotels. American fast food franchises are ubiquitous. Western (mostly American) style-foods and franchises can be found around the malls and in the city centre, offering food for upper mid-range prices.

There is even a popular alley in Juffair called ‘Americans’ Alley’, this is due to the huge variety of American-based restaurants in that area.

Signature dishes:

  • Machboos (also known as Kabsa) – mainly made from a mixture of spices, rice (usually long-grain basmati), meat and vegetables
  • Muhammar – a sweet rice dish which is typically served with fish

Snacks and bread:

  • Samosa – a fried or baked pastry with a savory filling, such as spiced potatoes, onions, peas, lentils, ground lamb or chicken.
  • Khubz (flatbread). Available in almost all supermarkets and cold stores.

Desserts:

  • The most popular traditional dessert is Halwa Showaiter, also known as Halwa Bahraini. It is a jelly like halwa made with corn starch, saffron and various nuts.

Traditional Bahraini food is very hard to find in restaurants, and is typically confined to the homes of locals. If you have Bahraini friends, being invited home for a meal is the best chance you have to sample the local cuisine.

DRINK:

Bahrain has relatively liberal laws regarding alcohol and has long been a favorite getaway for visitors from Saudi Arabia and other nearby “dry” countries — don’t be surprised to see Arabs in thobe and gutra sipping cool brewskis as they watch dancers strut their stuff in the nightclubs. However, alcohol can only be served by four-star hotels and higher, and you wouldn’t find it in supermarkets.

Under Bahraini law, any sign of having consumed alcohol may be taken as prima facie evidence of driving under the influence, which can lead to imprisonment and/or fines of up to BD 1,000.

Coffee, called gahwa ( قهوة ) locally, is considered a part of the traditional welcome in Bahrain. It is usually poured into a coffee-pot, which is called dalla ( دلة ) in Bahrain. It is served in a small cup made for coffee called finjan ( فنجان ).

There are several major malls in Bahrain that offer international and luxury labels shops and botiques, supermarkets and so forth, as well as food courts, contemporary and traditional cafes, play areas and arcades, cinemas (3D & 2D) and even an indoor water park.

A visit to the local souq is a must. There you can negotiate the price on “rolexes”, jewellery, and many other gifts. The souq is also home to many excellent tailors. If you’re there for long enough (say a week) then you can take a favourite clothing item in and they will “clone” it precisely in any material you select from the huge range available.

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Bahrain
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Qal’at al-Bahrain
Location: Manama, Bahrain
The Qal'at al-Bahrain, also known as the Bahrain Fort or Portuguese Fort, is an archaeological site located in Bahrain, on the Arabian Peninsula. Archaeological excavations carried out since 1954 have unearthed antiquities from an artificial mound of 12 m (39 ft) height containing seven stratified layers, created by various occupants from 2300 BC up to the 18th century, including Kassites, Greeks, Portuguese and Persians. It was once the capital of the Dilmun civilization and was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2005.

The fort and the tell Qal'at al-Bahrain is built on, are located on the Bahrain island, on the northern seashore. On a clear day it is also seen from Saar. It stands like a "sentinel" near Manama, the capital of Bahrain; it is 6 km (4 mi) away from Manama on the fertile north coast. The tell is the largest in the Persian Gulf region and was built close to the port and by reclamation of seashore land.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qal%27at_al-Bahrain
Name: Bahrain National Museum
Location: Manama, Bahrain
The Bahrain National Museum is the largest and one of the oldest public museums in Bahrain. It is constructed near the King Faisal Highway in Manama and opened in December 1988. The US$30 million museum complex covers 27,800 sq meters and consists of two buildings.

The museum possess a rich collection of Bahrain's ancient archaeological artifacts acquired since 1988, and covers nearly 5000 years of Bahrain's history. The complex includes three halls devoted to archaeology and the ancient civilisation of the Dilmun, while two other halls depict the culture and lifestyle of Bahrain's recent pre-industrial past. A notable exhibit is the Durand Stone, a long black basalt sculpture dating back to the Babylonian era.

In 1993, a further hall was opened, the Natural History Hall, focusing on the natural environment of Bahrain. This hall features specimens of Bahrain's flora and fauna. Among the exhibits in the ancient history section is an actual burial mound which was transported from its site in the desert and reassembled in the museum.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bahrain_National_Museum
Name: Al Fateh Grand Mosque
Location: Manama, Bahrain
The Al-Fateh Mosque (also known as Al-Fateh Islamic Center & Al Fateh Grand Mosque) is one of the largest mosques in the world, encompassing 6,500 square meters and having the capacity to accommodate over 7,000 worshippers at a time. The mosque was built by the late Sheikh Isa ibn Salman Al Khalifa in 1987 and was named after Ahmed Al Fateh, the founder of Bahrain. In 2006, Al-Fateh became the site of the National Library of Bahrain.

The mosque is the largest place of worship in Bahrain. It is located next to the King Faisal Highway in Juffair, which is a suburban neighborhood of Manama. The huge dome built on top of the Al-Fateh Mosque is constructed entirely of fibreglass. Weighing over 60 Megagrams (tonne), the dome is currently the world's largest fibreglass dome. The marble used in the floors is Italian and the chandelier is from Austria. The doors are made of teak wood from India. Throughout the mosque are calligraphy writings in a very old type of style called Bahrain.

The library of Ahmed Al-Fateh Islamic Center has around 7,000 books, some as old as 100 years or more.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Fateh_Grand_Mosque
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN BAHRAIN / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

Global Immigration Leader, Big 4

“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

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“Manny is a big reason why the move from (external provider) to the UK firm’s passport and visa provision has been so smooth. He’s an extremely likeable honest hard working guy who takes his role very seriously. We’re very fortunate to have him leading our dedicated team”

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“Most of my contact was with Manpreet Singh Johal. He did the best job someone could imagine. Extraordinary service from his side.”

Team member, Big 4

“Working on two priority accounts is naturally pressurised especially where he has also been responsible for billing on both accounts; yet Manny delivers every time and this I believe is an exceptional quality.”

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