BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS

BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS

BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS

SELECT YOUR NATIONALITY

– No current scheduled consular closures.
CONSULAR CLOSURES
N/A
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Necker Island
Location: British Virgin Islands
Necker Island is a 30-hectare (74-acre) island in the British Virgin Islands just north of Virgin Gorda. The island's land is entirely owned by Sir Richard Branson, chairman of the Virgin Group, and is part of the Virgin Limited Edition portfolio of luxury properties. The whole island operates as a resort and can accommodate up to 34 guests, with additional room for six children.

Necker Island is located at latitude 18.55 north and longitude 64.35 west in the eastern section of the British Virgin Islands. It is about 5.9 kilometres (3.7 mi) north of Virgin Gorda and north-east of Prickly Pear Island and also Mosquito Island (sometimes spelled Moskito Island), which is also owned by Branson. The British Virgin Islands (BVI) are a group of islands about 1,815 kilometres (1,128 mi) south-east of Miami, Florida, 184 km (114 mi) due east of San Juan, Puerto Rico, and about 175 km (109 mi) north-west of St. Barts.

The island was named after the 17th-century Dutch squadron commander Johannes de Neckere, although it remained uninhabited until the late 20th century.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Necker_Island_(British_Virgin_Islands)
Name: Virgin Gorda
Location: British Virgin Islands
Virgin Gorda is the third-largest (after Tortola and Anegada) and second most populous of the British Virgin Islands (BVI). Christopher Columbus is said to have named the island "The Fat Virgin", because the island's profile on the horizon looks like a fat woman lying on her side.

Historically renowned, the anchorage off Bitter End was the site of Sir Francis Drake and Sir John Hawkins' 1595 fleet rendezvous, two Elizabethan British admirals who led Britain's ascendance into naval supremacy. Twenty-six ships anchored in the sound and used the large hill at Bitter End to practice for their attack on San Juan, to wrest Puerto Rico from Spain. With both admirals dying on the 1595/1596 voyage, the land at Bitter End may be the last place that these legendary mariners set foot on British soil.

The sound is a famous destination for charter yachts and contains over 130 moorings. Nearly all of the 200-foot-plus (61 m) megayachts of the world have anchored or tied up at the docks of the megayacht-equipped marinas in this harbor.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virgin_Gorda
Name: The Baths
Location: British Virgin Islands
The Baths are a beach area on the island of Virgin Gorda among the British Virgin Islands in the Caribbean. The Baths is situated about 1.2 miles (1.9 km) south off the maintown Spanish Town at the southern tip of the island between Spring Bay and Devil's Bay. The Baths is an area of unique geologic formations and one of the BVI's major tourist destinations.

Although volcanism accounts for much of the Virgin Islands, The Baths was formed by granite that eroded into piles of boulders on the beach. Granite forms from the slow cooling of magma at depth nowhere close to surface volcanoes. The granite only appears at the surface after geologic ages have eroded away all the overburden covering it. Once exposed, erosion continued to isolate the granite into large boulders and round their surfaces. The boulders form natural tidal pools, tunnels, arches, and scenic grottoes that are open to the sea.

Since 1990, the area has been a BVI National Park as are the adjacent bays, and the area is a major tourist attraction, with swimming and snorkelling being the main attractions.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Baths
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.
COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS.
FACTS:
Official Languages: English
Currency: United States Dollar (USD)
Time zone: AST (UTC-4)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +1-284
Local / up-to-date weather in Spanish Town (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for British Virgin Islands travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to British Virgin Islands, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS.

BVI uses the U.S. dollar, denoted by the symbol “$” (ISO currency code: USD). It is divided into 100 cents.

BY BOAT:

A great way to see the islands is by boat. sailing boats and motor boats can be rented or chartered with a crew from any major harbour. The conditions for sailing and motoring depend on the time of year and anchoring off islands can be tricky, so either be sure you know what you are doing or hire a crew. Most companies that charter in the BVI will require you to prove a certain level of experience, either with sailing certification from a reputable organization or by providing an extensive sailing resume.

If you are an experienced sailor, it doesn’t get any better than the BVI. Line of sight sailing in moderate trade winds, no currents to speak of, barely any tides, and few underwater obstructions other than the shore itself make sailing around the islands very relaxing.

Road Town, on Tortola, is one of the principal centres for bareboating (self-hire yacht chartering) in the Caribbean. It is the headquarters of Sunsail Sailing Vacations and Tortola Marine, located in the Road Reef Marina; Conch Charters, BVI Boat, and The Moorings which are four of the main charter boat companies operating out of Road Town/Road Harbour. Ten minutes from Road Harbour is Nanny Cay Marina where you can find Horizon Yacht Charters and The Catamaran Company. You can also pick up a discounted yacht charter from one of the major operators or from an online broker such as LateSail; you’ll find the best price if you’re willing to go at shorter notice. For a luxury crewed yachting charter, Epic Yacht Charters will pair you perfectly with a crew and yacht.

BY CAR:

Cars can be rented on the larger islands such as Virgin Gorda and Tortola, but are obviously unnecessary on many smaller islands where goat paths and foot trails are the main mode of transportation. There is one scooter for rent on Jost Van Dyke. By law (to protect the taxi driver industry) it is not possible to rent cars at the airport, nor is it possible for car rental companies to pick people up at the airport.

Be aware that the roads are very hilly, the standard of the roads is low, the standard of the driving is very low, and there are no specific laws against driving whilst under the influence. People driving in the BVI for the first time are advised to think as if everyone else on the road is trying to cause an accident and make it look like their fault – although that is not actually true, it will give you the right frame of mind to have when get behind the wheel.

BY TAXI:

Taxis in the British Virgin Islands can be expensive. Do not bother to try and haggle – taxi prices are fixed by law. Taxi rides can be colourful – sometimes taxis are shared with other passengers or the driver may stop en route to run an errand. Either way, it’s a good chance to really get to know the island!

EAT:

Inevitably, freshly caught seafood is the dish of choice for most people. Lobster and various fish are available from the many restaurants in the BVI. The choices throughout the islands vary from very high-end dining options to beachside cafes. Local dishes include rotis and curries inspired by Guyana and Trinidad cuisine, to Italian, French and Asian influences.

The BVI sponsored an event titled “Taste the BVI” during the Annapolis Sailboat Show in Maryland, USA in 2009, with notable BVI chefs including Ken Molyneaux, Imran Ashton, Henry Prince, and Neil Cline.

In 2011, the BVI National Culinary Team won nine medals at the Taste of the Caribbean culinary competition, taking home five gold medals, including one in the Culinary Team of the Year category and one in the Chef of the Year category.

The national dish is considered to be Fish and fungee.

DRINK:

Rum, not surprisingly, is the drink of choice in the islands. Many rum-based delicious concoctions can be found at bars on the main beaches and roads. Because beaches in the BVI are so pristine, many do not have refreshment stands so it would be wise to bring at least water. However, a lot of the beaches have nearby restaurants and bars, so it’s easy to saunter over for a drink when you’re done relaxing on the sand. The “Painkiller” – a drink made from rum, coconut, and topped with OJ – is highly recommended, as is the Bushwacker. However, each bar has its own specialty drinks so it’s worth it to sample your way through the BVI. Watch out for the No-See-Um, a refreshing banana, coconut and pineapple drink made with 151 proof rum – it’ll get you before you see it coming!

There is plenty of Nightlife around Road Town, although many popular tourist places are advertised and some of the more local bars are worth checking out, so ask a local for what is on where. Live local music is a feature of many restaurants and bars. The sunsets are spectacular, so a drink on the beach or in the mountains, watching the sunset and listening to local music before dinner can be a very pleasant vacation from the usual club-based entertainment of most mainlanders. Banana Keets on Tortola offers a beautiful view of the sunset, as does Bitter End Yacht Club on Virgin Gorda. The Banana Keets terrace overlooks Sage Mountain as well. Expats tend to hang out in Road Town, at the Dove, le Cabanon, or Village Cay. These places are full on Fridays. Do not miss the Full Moon Party at Bomba’s Beach Shack, which is full of revelers and good tiems. This bar is famous for its walls where panties and bras are hanging, old licence plates are affixed to the walls, and drinks are flowing freely.

If you’re renting a boat, you already have your bed too, but for landlubbers, the larger islands offer resorts, budget bungalows, and a few things in between. To get off the beaten path there are many options if you’re willing to island hop by boat.

There are larger hotel options on Tortola, as well as many intimate, locally owned inns that are hidden treasures. Private islands like Necker Island (owned by Sir Richard Branson) and Guana Island can be rented. Peter Island Resort is a very exclusive private island resort (and is connected by a free ferry service from Road Town). Other high end resorts are on Virgin Gorda, but there are many villas and smaller hotels there as well. Jost Van Dyke offers laidback options and Anegada has adventurous packages for the active traveller.

Many visitors to the BVI stay on land will rent private guest houses rather than stay at larger hotels, and there are a large selection to choose from through the islands.

Shopping options vary in the BVI, from locally made to some high-end options, though not as flashy as the jewellery and tourist shops in nearby Saint Thomas or Saint Martin. With rare exceptions, international chains of shops are banned by law in the BVI to protect local character; however, there are some shops like Little Switzerland which are hugely popular with Caribbean visitors for the beautiful high-end wares.

The main shopping area on Tortola is Wickham’s Cay in Road Town. Main Street is a small, winding road leading from the Governor’s House, past the old Post Office to the Botanic Gardens. The shops on this road are housed in small, West Indian houses and often painted in bright colours, notably Serendipity Bookshop, perhaps the brightest of them all, which has a good collection of Caribbean history and cook books (and now has an internet cafe upstairs). Notable shops include Pussers, a store, popular bar and restaurant (and home of the infamous Painkiller drink!), Sunny Caribbee selling spices and handmade items, and Latitude 18 which sells casual beach clothes. Next to the historic post office is Amethyst, selling imported African and Indian items, Samarkand jewellery shop and across the road, Kaunda’s, where you can find Caribbean music.

Additionally, near the cruise ship dock is a branch of Columbian Emeralds jewellery store and opposite it, the Craft Market which despite its name sells mostly T-shirts and jewellery, clothes and other goods. Island crafts genuinely made in the BVI include crocheted items, straw hats, rum and guavaberry liqueur, and can be found in the craft market. Not to be missed are the small bakeries selling local delicacies like Johnny cakes, roti, fish soup and coconut bread.

On the rest of the island there are a number of pharmacies, supermarkets, variety stores and jewellery shops. Shoprite in East End and OneMart in Purcell offer good variety of food at better prices than in Road Town although Bobby’s supermarket in Road Town, Cane Garden Bay and Nanny Cay has good prices and is open till midnight 364 days a year (closed Good Friday). There is no need to find a speciality liquor outlet if you simply want a couple of bottles of wine, beer or rum as supermarket prices are excellent, rum is from $3 a bottle. Alcohol is very cheap in the BVI as there is not special taxes or duties on alcoholic beverages. If you are buying quantity or looking for speciality rums, Tico is an excellent store.

On Beef Island, near the airport, is the pretty Trellis Bay, which offers a selection of cafes, tourist shops and a supermarket. Both the Loose Mongoose beach cafe and the Last Resort restaurant on its very own miniature island are worth trying.

Shopping on Anegada is limited to basic necessities plus two gift shops at the hotel and camp ground. Similarly, on Jost van Dyke there are a few gift shops but mostly beach bars and places to laze the day away in a hammock, taking in paradise. Virgin Gorda has a supermarket in the marina and gift shops in the resorts.

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/British_Virgin_Islands
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Necker Island
Location: British Virgin Islands
Necker Island is a 30-hectare (74-acre) island in the British Virgin Islands just north of Virgin Gorda. The island's land is entirely owned by Sir Richard Branson, chairman of the Virgin Group, and is part of the Virgin Limited Edition portfolio of luxury properties. The whole island operates as a resort and can accommodate up to 34 guests, with additional room for six children.

Necker Island is located at latitude 18.55 north and longitude 64.35 west in the eastern section of the British Virgin Islands. It is about 5.9 kilometres (3.7 mi) north of Virgin Gorda and north-east of Prickly Pear Island and also Mosquito Island (sometimes spelled Moskito Island), which is also owned by Branson. The British Virgin Islands (BVI) are a group of islands about 1,815 kilometres (1,128 mi) south-east of Miami, Florida, 184 km (114 mi) due east of San Juan, Puerto Rico, and about 175 km (109 mi) north-west of St. Barts.

The island was named after the 17th-century Dutch squadron commander Johannes de Neckere, although it remained uninhabited until the late 20th century.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Necker_Island_(British_Virgin_Islands)
Name: Virgin Gorda
Location: British Virgin Islands
Virgin Gorda is the third-largest (after Tortola and Anegada) and second most populous of the British Virgin Islands (BVI). Christopher Columbus is said to have named the island "The Fat Virgin", because the island's profile on the horizon looks like a fat woman lying on her side.

Historically renowned, the anchorage off Bitter End was the site of Sir Francis Drake and Sir John Hawkins' 1595 fleet rendezvous, two Elizabethan British admirals who led Britain's ascendance into naval supremacy. Twenty-six ships anchored in the sound and used the large hill at Bitter End to practice for their attack on San Juan, to wrest Puerto Rico from Spain. With both admirals dying on the 1595/1596 voyage, the land at Bitter End may be the last place that these legendary mariners set foot on British soil.

The sound is a famous destination for charter yachts and contains over 130 moorings. Nearly all of the 200-foot-plus (61 m) megayachts of the world have anchored or tied up at the docks of the megayacht-equipped marinas in this harbor.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virgin_Gorda
Name: The Baths
Location: British Virgin Islands
The Baths are a beach area on the island of Virgin Gorda among the British Virgin Islands in the Caribbean. The Baths is situated about 1.2 miles (1.9 km) south off the maintown Spanish Town at the southern tip of the island between Spring Bay and Devil's Bay. The Baths is an area of unique geologic formations and one of the BVI's major tourist destinations.

Although volcanism accounts for much of the Virgin Islands, The Baths was formed by granite that eroded into piles of boulders on the beach. Granite forms from the slow cooling of magma at depth nowhere close to surface volcanoes. The granite only appears at the surface after geologic ages have eroded away all the overburden covering it. Once exposed, erosion continued to isolate the granite into large boulders and round their surfaces. The boulders form natural tidal pools, tunnels, arches, and scenic grottoes that are open to the sea.

Since 1990, the area has been a BVI National Park as are the adjacent bays, and the area is a major tourist attraction, with swimming and snorkelling being the main attractions.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Baths
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

Global Immigration Leader, Big 4

“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

Internal stakeholder, Big 4

“Manny is a big reason why the move from (external provider) to the UK firm’s passport and visa provision has been so smooth. He’s an extremely likeable honest hard working guy who takes his role very seriously. We’re very fortunate to have him leading our dedicated team”

External client, Private practice

“Most of my contact was with Manpreet Singh Johal. He did the best job someone could imagine. Extraordinary service from his side.”

Team member, Big 4

“Working on two priority accounts is naturally pressurised especially where he has also been responsible for billing on both accounts; yet Manny delivers every time and this I believe is an exceptional quality.”

Please think before printing – click here for more info

WEB LINKS

LOCATIONS