COSTA RICA

COSTA RICA

COSTA RICA

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Name: Manuel Antonio National Park
Location: Costa Rica
Manuel Antonio National Park, is a small National Park in the Central Pacific Conservation Area located on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica. It is the destination of as many as 150,000 visitors annually and well known for its beautiful beaches and hiking trails.

Although Manuel Antonio National Park is Costa Rica's smallest national park, the diversity of wildlife in its 6.83 km2 (3 sq mi) is unequaled with 109 species of mammals and 184 species of birds. Both brown-throated three-toed sloth and Hoffmann's two-toed sloth are a major feature, as are three of Costa Rica's four monkey species — the mantled howler monkey, Central American squirrel monkey, and Panamanian white-faced capuchin monkey. Included in the 184 bird species are toucans, woodpeckers, potoos, motmots, tanagers, turkey vulture, parakeets and hawks. Dolphins can be observed there, as well as the occasional migrating whale. Scuba diving, snorkeling, sea kayaking, mountain biking, and hiking provide opportunities to experience the tropical wildlife that enriches Manuel Antonio.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manuel_Antonio_National_Park
Name: Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve
Location: Costa Rica
The Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve is a Costa Rican reserve located along the Cordillera de Tilarán within the Puntarenas and Alajuela provinces. Named after the nearby town of Monteverde and founded in 1972, the Reserve consists of over 10,500 hectares of cloud forest. The Reserve consists of 6 ecological zones, 90% of which are virgin forest. An extremely high biodiversity, consisting of over 2,500 plant species (including the most orchid species in a single place), 100 species of mammals, 400 bird species, 120 reptilian and amphibian species, and thousands of insects, has drawn both scientists and tourists alike.

Monteverde is known worldwide as the habitat of the golden toad (Bufo periglenes), a species that disappeared in 1989. 91 (21%) of Monteverde's bird species are long distance migratory birds, which reproduce in North America and pass through Monteverde during their migration or spend the winter in the area

Currently the Reserve is visited by more than 70,000 people each year, who are eager to get to know the biodiversity found within.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monteverde_Cloud_Forest_Reserve
Name: Arenal Volcano National Park
Location: Costa Rica
Arenal Volcano National Park is a Costa Rican national park in the central part of the country. The park encompasses the Arenal Volcano, which "was" the most active in the country, which had previously been believed to be dormant until a major eruption in 1968. It neighbors Lake Arenal, which is the site of the country's largest hydroelectricity project, the Lake Arenal Dam.

The park also contains a second volcano, Chato, whose crater contains a lagoon. It is also called Cerro Chato as it has been inactive for around 3500 years–coinciding with the creation and growth of Arenal itself. In and around the park are various lodges and hotels, some with their own hot springs, and others focused on the wildlife of the area.

The park lies within the 2,040 square km Arenal Tilaran Conservation Area, protecting eight of Costa Rica's 12 life zones and 16 protected reserves in the region between the Guanacaste and Tilarán mountain ranges, and including Lake Arenal. The park is most directly accessed from La Fortuna, but is also easily accessed via Tilarán and the north shore of Lake Arenal.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arenal_Volcano_National_Park
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
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COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO COSTA RICA.
FACTS:
Official Languages: Spanish
Currency: Costa Rica Colon (CRC)
Time zone: CST (UTC−6)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +506
Local / up-to-date weather in San José (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Costa Rica travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Costa Rica, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO COSTA RICA.
  • The local currency is the Costa Rican colón (plural, colones) CRC named after Christopher Columbus (whose name was Cristobal Colón in Spanish) sometimes shown locally as ₡ and sometimes shown using the more commonly available U.S. cent symbol ‘¢’ or ₵.Money exchange is provided at most banks, however it is recommended to do so at the state banks, especially the Banco Nacional, since they have lower rates. There is also a money exchange service at the airport, but it is outrageously expensive. U.S. dollars are commonly used; in the tourist setting, almost everything is priced in U.S. dollars (but sometimes prices are cheaper in colones). When a price is quoted in “dollars”, the speaker may be thinking of a dollar as 500 colones; so it is always worth checking whether this is what is meant. When paying with U.S. dollars, you may receive change in local currency; thus, if you are about to leave the country and don’t need colones any more, make sure to have small-denomination U.S. dollar bills.

    You can find ATMs in most places. They normally dispense U.S. dollars and colones. With a Visa credit card, you can get money at almost all ATMs. If you have a MasterCard try the ATMs in the AM/PM supermarkets; they give you up to ₡250,000 (about US$500). Another option are the ATH-ATMs but they just give you up to ₡100,000 (about US$200) each transaction. EC-Cards (European) are accepted at all ATMs. The limit is usually set only by the card. In addition, drawing money with your EC-Card will almost always give you a better exchange rate than changing cash in a bank. Around payday, the 15th of the month, ATMs can be emptied of cash, especially in small towns like La Fortuna or Quepos, and some cards may not work.

    It is also very common to pay even small amounts by Visa or MasterCard, but much less common with American Express.

    You might get a discount (such as between 5% and 10%) when paying in cash, but it is not common enough to be expected. Also, it is not really necessary to get colones at the airport because you can pay everywhere in U.S. dollars and receive colones as change. Most places, except the smallest restaurants, take credit cards and many places including the gas stations take American Express.

    Traveller’s checks are rarely used. When using them, unless for hotel nights, change them first at a bank. Expect long delays with traveller’s checks at the bank, lots of stamping, the higher up the official at the bank the more stamps they have.

BY BUS:

  • Centrocoasting is a free and invaluable resource for navigating the country (and rest of Central America) by bus, and offers bus schedules and prices for most of the major routes in the region.

Most major tourist destinations in Costa Rica are served by at least two daily buses from and to San José. The advantages of public transportation in Costa Rica are that tickets are cheap (rarely more than US$7 per person) and they cover most towns around the country. San José serves as a national hub, and there are smaller regional hubs in the terminal de autobuses of larger cities in each province. The buses are also not booked with an early reservation system so it is possible to not have a seat on popular routes, however they typically do allow extra passengers in standing room. However, many do have assigned seats once you buy a ticket at the station and so get there early to be sure you get your bus. Depending on the company and stop, you will either buy a ticket at the bus terminal or pay the driver directly.

In San José there is no single central bus station, but several different ones, with each station roughly serving a different area of the country, with some exceptions. For example, most of the service to the Caribbean side of the country leaves from the Terminal Gran Caribe. Direct service to the far south Caribbean coast is provided from the Puntarenas bus station, which mostly serves the west side of the country. Still, you can still get to the Caribe side by taking a bus (on the Autotransportes Caribeños‎ line) from the Terminal Gran Caribe to Limón, and then transferring there to another bus south (the Mepe line). In short, do some research beforehand so you don’t get lost looking for your bus. Often you can just call or e-mail your final destination (e.g. your hotel) and they will tell you what bus to take, where to catch it and how often it runs.

Note, buses can be infrequent and unreliable. Instead of waiting for hours for the bus at the highway, you are better off trying to hitch-hike, which is often faster, more economical and more successful. If the bus does come eventually, you can always still take them.

Unfortunately, many bus drivers will try to rip off innocent tourists. Always pretend like you are waiting for change after having given the money. Often they will give you parts of the change searching for the rest. The unsuspected tourist will assume that’s it. But often just waiting does the trick, and you will get the rest. Note, prices between the most important places are always put up above the driver where you can verify them. Rounded ticket prices like ₡1,000 or ₡2,000 should always raise your suspicions. Do not let them fool you, that just worsens the situation for other tourists and the locals. If you simply do not want to put up with that, then just hitch-hike.

BY RENTAL CAR:

One great advantage of renting a car is that you can visit many of the secluded beaches and mountain areas. And with the power of the internet, you can now rent just about any vehicle online and have it waiting for you when you arrive.

For US$350-700 a week you can rent an econocar/mid size four-wheel drive. Insurance is the majority of this cost and it is not optional. Four-wheel-drive is good for extensive traveling outside the Central Valley, especially in the wet season. In the dry season going from La Fortuna to Monteverde via a direct route was over a boulder-strewn 25-50 km/h (15-30 mph) road. Four-wheel-drive was also useful on the Nicoya coast. (Above based on 2001 roads.) It’s often possible to rent a car with a local driver from the various tour companies, if driving yourself seems a bit daunting.

Due to the condition of most roads outside San José, car insurance, even with a zero-deductible option, generally does not cover tires and rims. Car rental companies require a guaranty deposit from US$750 during the rental period and a credit card is necessary for this process. Using an insurance program provided by some types of gold or platinum credit cards is a good advantage, since these credit cards would cover small scratches, small dents as well as the entire rented vehicle in case of collision or theft.

You have to exercise caution when renting a car in Costa Rica; where it is not uncommon for rental companies to claim “damage” they insist you inflicted on the vehicle. It is by far the best policy to rent a car through a Costa Rican travel agent. If you are traveling on a package, your agent will sort this out. Otherwise, go into an ICT-accredited travel agent in San José and ask them to arrange rental for you. This should be no more expensive than renting on your own and will help guard against false claims of damage and other accusations; rental companies will be less willing to make trouble with an agent who regularly sends them clients than with individual customers who they may not see again.

Make sure to check the car carefully before you sign off on the damage sheet. Check the oil, brake fluid, fuel gauge (to make sure it’s full) and that there is a spare tire with a good air pressure and a jack. Look up the Spanish word for “scratches” (rayas) and other relevant terminology first, so you can at least scrutinize the rental company’s assessment. Ask them to write down all the minor damages, not just check on the drawing, and keep a copy of this document with you.

Take the maximum insurance (around US$15–20 per day); because of the country’s high accident rate, you need to be covered for damage to the vehicle, yourself, any third party and public property.

BY RENTAL MOTORCYCLE:

For about US$420 a week, depending on the bike and the season, you can rent a dual sport bike or a chopper. A motorcycle rental company requires a guaranty deposit from US$600 during the rental period.

BY TAXI:

Another easy way to get around Costa Rica is to use the services of mini-vans. At most of the hotels, the receptionist is able to assist travelers who want to travel across the country by arranging for the services of a driver. Rates are reasonable (US$29 per person, for example, to get from San José to Tamarindo in April 2007) The drivers know the roads well; the vans are clean and comfortable; and they take you from door to door.

Taxis are available in most large cities. They are usually inexpensive, charging only a few dollars to get most anywhere within the city. The meter is called “la maria”; ask the driver to turn it on immediately upon getting in the car, or he may leave it off and make up his own, more expensive, price when you get to your destination. Also try checking it wasn’t running before you got in, the initial fare shouldn’t be higher than ₡600. Most drivers know familiar routes such as San José to Santa Ana and you can find the rate by asking “Cuanto para ir a _____” and he will tell you the flat rate. This can keep you from paying too much because the driver will not make unnecessary detours. Official taxis are red with a yellow triangle on the side. They also have yellow triangles on the side of the car which will have a number in it. If the number matches the number listed on the license plate, it is an official taxi. Do not get in if the numbers do not match. “Pirate Taxis”, though sometimes cheaper, are not safe. Do not risk it. If you are alone, especially. If you are female, ride in the back seat, as riding in the front with the driver can be seen as suggestive. Caution should be exercised when using this service, extra caution. It’s not recommended to ride non-red cabs.

BY PLANE:

There are two main internal airlines that connect the major tourist towns, Aerobell Airlines and Sansa. You are limited to 11-14 kg (25-30 pounds) of carry-on luggage per person, depending on the airline. Nature Air allows more luggage per person, as their planes are larger and are also twin-engine.

In 2017 Nature Air had a serious accident with all aboard the aircraft dying as a consequence and the loss of the airplane meaning a reduction of their fleet size by 50%. Nature Air has subsequently had all their flights canceled in 2018 and while they claim to be planning to get permission from regulatory authorities, it remains doubtful whether they’ll ever be airborne again. The crash, which also killed American citizens, has led the US to issue a warning against privately chartered airplanes in the region, but as many airlines – including both Nature Air and Sansa – fly broadly similar single engine propeller aircraft seating a dozen or so, the safety concerns seem to apply more broadly, if they apply.

Neither of them will carry a longboard and both limit the number of short surboards they will carry. Be sure to check with airline for current limits on length of boards allowed.

BY TRAIN:

While the train service was closed in 1995, the Incofer (Costa Rican Railway Institute) remained operational and is putting the abandoned rails to use again in the San José metropolitan area. Train service still suffers from decades of neglect and only rarely is a train faster or cheaper than a bus, but new lines and improvements to existing lines (mostly for commuters in and around San José) are planned for the near future. Schedules still mostly show a commuter layout with trains being plentiful in the morning and evening and scant or missing in the middle of the day or at night.

Tickets cost around ₡500 one way with discounts for the elderly.

  • Alajuela – Heredia – San José Service
  • Belén – Pavas – San José – Curridabat Service
  • Cartago (Costa Rica) – San José service

EAT:

Costa Rican cuisine can be described as simple but wholesome. The spiciness often associated with Latin America has typically originated in Mexico; most Costa Rican foods are not spicy, but, as they simmer in a large pot, the flavors are blended. If you react adversely to the taste of cilantro, Costa Rica might be a difficult place for you as it is ubiquitous, and the problem some foreigners have with it is virtually unknown.

Gallo pinto is a mixture of rice and beans with a little cilantro (fresh coriander) or onion thrown in. While more common at breakfast, it can also be served at lunch or dinner.

Casado, which means married, is the typical lunch in Costa Rica, containing rice and beans with meat, chicken or fish, always served with salad and fried plantain.

Plato del dia, is the ‘Plate of the Day’ and is often a casado, but has the meat or fish selection of the day. Usually around US$5 and includes a natural juice.

Sopa negra, literally “black soup”, is a type of soup made with black beans, thus giving it its color, and often paired with some rice.

Tres leches, literally “three milks”, is a cake that serves as the quintessential Costa Rican dessert. The “three milks” refer to condensed milk, evaporated milk and cream, all of which are used to make the dish. As the name suggests, it is rather rich, so beware if you are lactose intolerant.

Chicharrones refers to fried pork rinds. Unlike its better-known Mexican counterpart, which largely uses only the skin, Costa Rican chicharrones make use of the meat as well.

Salchichón is a type of pork sausage that often features in traditional Costa Rican dishes such as gallo pinto or casado.

Good, fresh fruit is abundant in variety and low in cost. Mercados (markets) provide an excellent place to sample fruit and other Costa Rican fare, with many including sit-down snack bars. You are encouraged to experiment because some of the local fruits do not travel well as they are bruised easily and or have a short shelf life. The mango found in store in North America are much more fibrous and less sweet than the mangos found in Costa Rica. The fingerling bananas are much more creamy and less tart than the ones found in North America.

A quintessentially Costa Rican place to have a meal is called a soda, which typically sells Costa Rican staples such as gallo pinto and casado, as well as fruit juices, milkshakes and other drinks.

Be sure to stop off at a rest stop along any of the roads: a casado and beer will cost about US$3.

Don’t forget to try the Salsa Lizano that you will surely find at any restaurant. It is a mild vegetable sauce that has a hint of curry and is slightly sweet. It’s often referred to as Costa Rican ketchup, though many recipes suggest substituting Worcestershire sauce outside Costa Rica. Ticos eat it with almost anything. Bring some home with you. You can find smaller-sized bottles at any market.

Standard breakfast fare is rice and beans, in common with the rest of Central America.

Vegetarians will find it surprisingly easy to eat well in Costa Rica.

Don’t forget to tip tour guides, drivers, bellboys and maids. Restaurant bills in midscale places include a “voluntary” 10% gratuity. North Americans often get better service because they are used to tipping separately, but it’s not necessary.

The beef cattle are raised on grass; the meat will taste differently from corn-fed cattle. The cuts of meat at the local restaurants are also different. The taste of chicken is not discernibly distinct.

DRINK:

Most places have potable water, so don’t worry about drinking tap water. Bottled water is also available at low prices.

Ready-to-drink coffee is excellent and considered to be among the best in the world.

Refrescos are beverages made from fresh fruit (cas, guanabana, sandia/watermelon, mora/blackberry, fresa/strawberry, granadilla/passion fruit), sugar, and either water or milk. All small, cheap diners – known locally as sodas – serve these. You can also easily buy the standard international soft drinks. Fresca, Canada Dry, and the local Fanta Kolita (fruit punch) are recommended.

The national drink is called guaro, which is made from fermented sugar cane. It is similar to vodka, and is usually drunk with water and lemon. It’s not a very “clean” liquor, so exercise caution.

There are around eight national beers available (and most international), which are sold in cans, bottles and even kegs. The most common beers in the country are Pilsen and Imperial: all bars and restaurants serve both. Bavaria, “Bavaria Negra” (dark) and Bavaria Light are considered higher quality but more expensive, Rock Ice and Rock Ice Limón (lemon flavor) has a higher alcohol percentage and is less common in rural areas. Heineken is locally made under license and is more expensive as well.

Selling and serving alcoholic beverages is illegal in some parts of Costa Rica on the Thursday and Friday before Easter.

You can find many places to stay all over Costa Rica, including hotels, aparthotels, condos, vacation rentals, and cabinas. Vacation homes, cabinas, and condos can be less expensive than hotels and provide more flexibility in your adventure to Costa Rica. Costa Rica is known as a world leader for eco and sustainable travel and accommodations are often listed as ‘eco-lodges’. They do tend to be more expensive though the government does have a well functioning certification program. Be careful of so-called “motels.” In Costa Rica as well as much of Latin America this term tends to refer to places more associated with short term stays by couples looking for privacy. The rooms are often rented by the hour.

Apart from the big reservation websites, also checkout GoogleMaps, which has many home stays, guesthouses and such including location, rating and phone number (for WhatsApp). This is generally cheaper than booking online, but always compare.

The most common souvenirs are made from wood. Unless it’s marked as responsible (plantation grown wood), it is most likely not, and may be contributing to the deforestation of Costa Rica – or even Nicaragua or Panama.

Most visitors returning home are not allowed to bring back any raw foods or plants. Accordingly, the single most desirable commodity for visitors to take home may be roasted (not green) coffee, considered by many as some of the world’s best. Numerous web sites explain the fine qualities of various growing regions, types of beans, types of roasting and sources for purchase. Best prices come by purchasing several (sealed) bags of 12 ounces or so. Experts recommend buying whole beans (entero) in any kind of storage; whole beans last longer, and Costa Rican ground coffee often contains sugar, as it is preferred by locals. The stores in San José airport will sell you excellent coffee, but other good quality blends can be found in local supermarkets and direct from the roasters. It can be an expensive but delicious habit. If you’re serious about your coffee, bring at least a partially-empty suitcase and fill it with perhaps a year’s supply (web sites explain how to store it that long). Take care with tourist outlets where small quantities may cost as much as ordering on the internet.

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Costa_Rica
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PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Manuel Antonio National Park
Location: Costa Rica
Manuel Antonio National Park, is a small National Park in the Central Pacific Conservation Area located on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica. It is the destination of as many as 150,000 visitors annually and well known for its beautiful beaches and hiking trails.

Although Manuel Antonio National Park is Costa Rica's smallest national park, the diversity of wildlife in its 6.83 km2 (3 sq mi) is unequaled with 109 species of mammals and 184 species of birds. Both brown-throated three-toed sloth and Hoffmann's two-toed sloth are a major feature, as are three of Costa Rica's four monkey species — the mantled howler monkey, Central American squirrel monkey, and Panamanian white-faced capuchin monkey. Included in the 184 bird species are toucans, woodpeckers, potoos, motmots, tanagers, turkey vulture, parakeets and hawks. Dolphins can be observed there, as well as the occasional migrating whale. Scuba diving, snorkeling, sea kayaking, mountain biking, and hiking provide opportunities to experience the tropical wildlife that enriches Manuel Antonio.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manuel_Antonio_National_Park
Name: Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve
Location: Costa Rica
The Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve is a Costa Rican reserve located along the Cordillera de Tilarán within the Puntarenas and Alajuela provinces. Named after the nearby town of Monteverde and founded in 1972, the Reserve consists of over 10,500 hectares of cloud forest. The Reserve consists of 6 ecological zones, 90% of which are virgin forest. An extremely high biodiversity, consisting of over 2,500 plant species (including the most orchid species in a single place), 100 species of mammals, 400 bird species, 120 reptilian and amphibian species, and thousands of insects, has drawn both scientists and tourists alike.

Monteverde is known worldwide as the habitat of the golden toad (Bufo periglenes), a species that disappeared in 1989. 91 (21%) of Monteverde's bird species are long distance migratory birds, which reproduce in North America and pass through Monteverde during their migration or spend the winter in the area

Currently the Reserve is visited by more than 70,000 people each year, who are eager to get to know the biodiversity found within.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monteverde_Cloud_Forest_Reserve
Name: Arenal Volcano National Park
Location: Costa Rica
Arenal Volcano National Park is a Costa Rican national park in the central part of the country. The park encompasses the Arenal Volcano, which "was" the most active in the country, which had previously been believed to be dormant until a major eruption in 1968. It neighbors Lake Arenal, which is the site of the country's largest hydroelectricity project, the Lake Arenal Dam.

The park also contains a second volcano, Chato, whose crater contains a lagoon. It is also called Cerro Chato as it has been inactive for around 3500 years–coinciding with the creation and growth of Arenal itself. In and around the park are various lodges and hotels, some with their own hot springs, and others focused on the wildlife of the area.

The park lies within the 2,040 square km Arenal Tilaran Conservation Area, protecting eight of Costa Rica's 12 life zones and 16 protected reserves in the region between the Guanacaste and Tilarán mountain ranges, and including Lake Arenal. The park is most directly accessed from La Fortuna, but is also easily accessed via Tilarán and the north shore of Lake Arenal.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arenal_Volcano_National_Park
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN COSTA RICA / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

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...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

Global Immigration Leader, Big 4

“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

Internal stakeholder, Big 4

“Manny is a big reason why the move from (external provider) to the UK firm’s passport and visa provision has been so smooth. He’s an extremely likeable honest hard working guy who takes his role very seriously. We’re very fortunate to have him leading our dedicated team”

External client, Private practice

“Most of my contact was with Manpreet Singh Johal. He did the best job someone could imagine. Extraordinary service from his side.”

Team member, Big 4

“Working on two priority accounts is naturally pressurised especially where he has also been responsible for billing on both accounts; yet Manny delivers every time and this I believe is an exceptional quality.”

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