GAMBIA

GAMBIA

GAMBIA

SELECT YOUR NATIONALITY

– No current scheduled consular closures.
CONSULAR CLOSURES
THE EMBASSY OF GAMBIA IN LONDON IS CLOSED:
No current scheduled consular closures
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Kachikally Museum and Crocodile Pool
Location: Bakau, Gambia
The Kachikally crocodile pool is located in the heart of Bakau, Gambia, about 10 miles (16 km) from the capital Banjul. It is one of three sacred crocodile pools used as sites for fertility rituals. The others are Folonko in Kombo South and Berending on the north bank.

Kachikally is a privately owned shrine belonging to the Bojang family of Bakau, one of the founding families and major land owners of the city. Kachikally is also the name of the central district of Bakau town; other districts are Sanchaba and New Town.

The exact number of crocodiles is not known but it is estimated that there are about 80. It was long claimed that all the animals are Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus), but research[2] suggests they are a different species, namely the West African crocodile (Crocodylus suchus). There have been reports of the presence of albino crocodiles. Crocodiles are allowed to roam freely, and can be approached and touched by visitors. Crocodiles found in the wild are sometimes taken to and reared at the holy pools.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kachikally_Museum_and_Crocodile_Pool
Name: Kunta Kinteh Island
Location: North Bank Division, Gambia
Kunta Kinteh Island, formerly called James Island and St Andrew's Island, is an island in the Gambia River, 30 km from the river mouth and near Juffureh in the country of the Gambia. Fort James is located on the island. It is less than 3.2 km from Albreda on the river's northern bank.

As an important historical site in the West African slave trade, it is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, together with related sites including Albreda, Juffureh and Fort Bullen. Kunta Kinteh Island is suffering heavy erosion, and is now approximately 1/6 of its size during the time when the fort was active. Ruins of several of the British administrative buildings (including a single cell, apparently used to house the most troublesome captives), a small jetty and a number of skeletal baobab trees remain. The ruins have been stabilised and protected by a capping.

Kunta Kinte, a character described in Alex Haley's book and TV series Roots, has become associated with James Island. The book states that Kunta Kinte was among 98 slaves that the slave ship Lord Ligonier brought to Annapolis, Maryland in 1767.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kunta_Kinteh_Island
Name: Gambia River
Location: Gambia
The Gambia River (formerly known as the River Gambra) is a major river in West Africa, running 1,120 kilometres (700 mi) from the Fouta Djallon plateau in north Guinea westward through Senegal and the Gambia to the Atlantic Ocean at the city of Banjul. It is navigable for about half that length.

The river is strongly associated with The Gambia, the smallest country in mainland Africa, which consists of little more than the downstream half of the river and its two banks.Near the mouth of the river, near Juffure, is Kunta Kinteh Island, a place used in the slave trade which is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site.On the banks of the river, the Kaira Konko Lodge, a scout camp, is located there.

The aquatic fauna in the Gambia River basin is closely associated with that of the Sénégal River basin, and the two are usually combined under a single ecoregion known as the Senegal-Gambia Catchments. Although the species richness is moderately high, only three species of frogs and one fish are endemic to this ecoregion. Oysters are harvested from the River Gambia by women and used to make oyster stew, a traditional dish in the cuisine of Gambia.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gambia_River
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN GAMBIA / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO GAMBIA.
FACTS:
Official Languages: English
Currency: Gambia Dalasi (GMD)
Time zone: GMT (UTC)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +220
Local / up-to-date weather in Banjul (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Gambia travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Gambia, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO GAMBIA.

Gambia uses the dalasi as its currency, denoted by the symbol “D” (ISO currency code: GMD). The dalasi is divided into 100 bututs. Banknotes come in D5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 denominations and you may find D0.25, D0.50 and D1 coins in circulation.

It is better you take CFA francs, euro or dollars with you. If you have a Visa credit card and don’t use a PIN or you forgot it, then the only bank that can help you out is (the bigger) GT Bank in Banjul, which only requires your card, your passport, and your signature.

ATMs:

MasterCard and Visa can now be used at any GT Bank or EcoBank ATMs to withdraw cash.

BY CAR:

A 4WD is recommended if you plan to rent a car, since the roads often are in bad condition and only a minority is paved.

BY TAXI:

There are two types of cabs: green ones (tourist cabs) and yellow ones (regular cabs). Green cabs are expensive and the price is regardless of the number of passengers. Although there is no vehicle testing system in Gambia, these taxis must have basics such as seat belts and working indicators. Yellow taxis are much cheaper and the price depends on the number of persons in the cab. They are used mainly by locals, and in many tourist areas they are prohibited from picking up tourists. Often it is worth it to walk a little to get a yellow taxi.

BY BIKE:

You can rent a bike from pretty much anyone that owns one at a negotiated rate. Cycling on major roads can be risky, as motorist safety is unreliable, some roads are not well-maintained, sand and steep shoulders cause road hazards, and pedestrians may walk or veer onto the open road without warning. In high traffic areas, taxis and vans often cut off cyclists to pick up travellers and the car horn may be used excessively to warn of impending passage.

BY BOAT:

The Gambia River is navigable the entire length of the country.

GUIDED TOURS:

There are many companies that offer guided tours in Gambia.

There are also official tourist guides that will arrange transportation and guide you. They offer a good service and you will get to travel in a small group (usually 1 to 6 persons). Beware that there are false official guides, so always meet them at their offices, around tourist resorts.

EAT:

  • Benachin or Jollof rice — a traditional West African rice dish with onions, spices, tomatoes or tomato paste mixed with meat, fish or vegetables.
  • Chicken Yassa — chicken boiled with onion, black pepper and lime or lemon.
  • Domoda — meat stew with rice and peanut butter sauce.
  • Lots and lots of peanuts, the main crop of The Gambia.
    International food.
  • Please don’t be put off by what you may hear about Gambian cuisine, everything may come with rice, but the cuisine is international and the fish is great. But if you’re after something your stomach is used to, then there is a plethora of international restaurants to choose from where you can have a Chinese or Indian curry, good old fish & chips or Japanese noodles, and there are also Thai, Lebanese, German, Dutch and Mexican even British-run eateries where you can get a full English breakfast.

DRINK:

  • Gambia’s own beer, Julbrew is worth a try. It’s made by Banjul Breweries, who also make soft drinks.
  • Palm Wine is juice from palm trees that is collected and fermented. It is used as a kind of wine by the locals, and you may get a chance to try it if you go on a tour to rural Gambia.
  • Baobab juice
  • Spirits. You can buy most of the well known spirits and liqueurs in the tourist areas along the coastal strip
  • Spirits, Beers & Cigarettes. Julbrew is a lager beer, it is mainly sold in bottles but you can get in a draught form which is a lot less gassey than the bottled. You can get most of the spirits you would expect to find at home and they are still a lot cheaper than in the Costas, Greece or Turkey. Whisky, rum, gin, vodka, brandy are freely available as are Curacao and Tia Maria. Cigarettes can be bought very cheaply at around GBP2.50, €2.80 per 200 pack from all the main supermarkets or in the tourist areas.

There are many luxury 4- and 5-star resorts along the Atlantic coastline. Further in land there are eco camps and lodges which offer basic accommodation usually in natural surroundings.

Souvenirs:

  • Kora is the main music instrument of the Mandinka tribe, and could be considered the national instrument of Gambia. It is 21-stringed and built from a large calabash cut in half and covered with cow skin to make a resonator. It sounds like a mixture of harp and flamenco guitar. Real koras can be very expensive but small souvenir versions are also available.
  • Tailor made clothes can be bought at cheap prices.
  • Wood carvings
  • Wooden masks
  • African drums
  • Hand-woven table runners and place mats.
  • Batik and tie-dye fabric.
**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Gambia
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Kachikally Museum and Crocodile Pool
Location: Bakau, Gambia
The Kachikally crocodile pool is located in the heart of Bakau, Gambia, about 10 miles (16 km) from the capital Banjul. It is one of three sacred crocodile pools used as sites for fertility rituals. The others are Folonko in Kombo South and Berending on the north bank.

Kachikally is a privately owned shrine belonging to the Bojang family of Bakau, one of the founding families and major land owners of the city. Kachikally is also the name of the central district of Bakau town; other districts are Sanchaba and New Town.

The exact number of crocodiles is not known but it is estimated that there are about 80. It was long claimed that all the animals are Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus), but research[2] suggests they are a different species, namely the West African crocodile (Crocodylus suchus). There have been reports of the presence of albino crocodiles. Crocodiles are allowed to roam freely, and can be approached and touched by visitors. Crocodiles found in the wild are sometimes taken to and reared at the holy pools.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kachikally_Museum_and_Crocodile_Pool
Name: Kunta Kinteh Island
Location: North Bank Division, Gambia
Kunta Kinteh Island, formerly called James Island and St Andrew's Island, is an island in the Gambia River, 30 km from the river mouth and near Juffureh in the country of the Gambia. Fort James is located on the island. It is less than 3.2 km from Albreda on the river's northern bank.

As an important historical site in the West African slave trade, it is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, together with related sites including Albreda, Juffureh and Fort Bullen. Kunta Kinteh Island is suffering heavy erosion, and is now approximately 1/6 of its size during the time when the fort was active. Ruins of several of the British administrative buildings (including a single cell, apparently used to house the most troublesome captives), a small jetty and a number of skeletal baobab trees remain. The ruins have been stabilised and protected by a capping.

Kunta Kinte, a character described in Alex Haley's book and TV series Roots, has become associated with James Island. The book states that Kunta Kinte was among 98 slaves that the slave ship Lord Ligonier brought to Annapolis, Maryland in 1767.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kunta_Kinteh_Island
Name: Gambia River
Location: Gambia
The Gambia River (formerly known as the River Gambra) is a major river in West Africa, running 1,120 kilometres (700 mi) from the Fouta Djallon plateau in north Guinea westward through Senegal and the Gambia to the Atlantic Ocean at the city of Banjul. It is navigable for about half that length.

The river is strongly associated with The Gambia, the smallest country in mainland Africa, which consists of little more than the downstream half of the river and its two banks.Near the mouth of the river, near Juffure, is Kunta Kinteh Island, a place used in the slave trade which is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site.On the banks of the river, the Kaira Konko Lodge, a scout camp, is located there.

The aquatic fauna in the Gambia River basin is closely associated with that of the Sénégal River basin, and the two are usually combined under a single ecoregion known as the Senegal-Gambia Catchments. Although the species richness is moderately high, only three species of frogs and one fish are endemic to this ecoregion. Oysters are harvested from the River Gambia by women and used to make oyster stew, a traditional dish in the cuisine of Gambia.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gambia_River
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN GAMBIA / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

Global Immigration Leader, Big 4

“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

Internal stakeholder, Big 4

“Manny is a big reason why the move from (external provider) to the UK firm’s passport and visa provision has been so smooth. He’s an extremely likeable honest hard working guy who takes his role very seriously. We’re very fortunate to have him leading our dedicated team”

External client, Private practice

“Most of my contact was with Manpreet Singh Johal. He did the best job someone could imagine. Extraordinary service from his side.”

Team member, Big 4

“Working on two priority accounts is naturally pressurised especially where he has also been responsible for billing on both accounts; yet Manny delivers every time and this I believe is an exceptional quality.”

Please think before printing – click here for more info

WEB LINKS

LOCATIONS