GEORGIA

GEORGIA

GEORGIA

SELECT YOUR NATIONALITY

– No current scheduled consular closures.
CONSULAR CLOSURES
THE EMBASSY OF GEORGIA IN LONDON IS CLOSED:
No current scheduled consular closures
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Narikala
Location: Tbilisi, Georgia
Narikala is an ancient fortress overlooking Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, and the Kura River. The fortress consists of two walled sections on a steep hill between the sulphur baths and the botanical gardens of Tbilisi. On the lower court there is the recently restored St Nicholas church. Newly built in 1996–1997, it replaces the original 13th-century church that was destroyed in a fire. The new church is of "prescribed cross" type, having doors on three sides. The internal part of the church is decorated with the frescos showing scenes both from the Bible and history of Georgia.

The fortress was established in the 4th century as Shuris-tsikhe (i.e. "Invidious Fort") and it was a Persian citadel. It was considerably expanded by the Umayyads in the 7th century and later, by king David the Builder (1089–1125). The Mongols renamed it "Narin Qala" (i.e. "Little Fortress"). Most of extant fortifications date from the 16th and 17th centuries. In 1827, parts of the fortress were damaged by an earthquake and demolished.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narikala
Name: Holy Trinity Cathedral
Location: Tbilisi, Georgia
The Holy Trinity Cathedral of Tbilisi commonly known as Sameba, is the main cathedral of the Georgian Orthodox Church located in Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia. Constructed between 1995 and 2004, it is the third-tallest Eastern Orthodox cathedral in the world and one of the largest religious buildings in the world by total area.

The idea to build a new cathedral to commemorate 1,500 years of autocephaly of the Georgian Orthodox Church and 2,000 years from the birth of Jesus emerged as early as 1989, a crucial year for the national awakening of the then-Soviet republic of Georgia. In May 1989, the Georgian Orthodox Patriarchate and the authorities of Tbilisi announced an international contest for the "Holy Trinity Cathedral" project. No winner was chosen at the first round of the contest when more than a hundred projects were submitted. Finally the design by architect Archil Mindiashvili won. The subsequent turbulent years of civil unrest in Georgia deferred this grandiose plan for six years, and it was not until November 23, 1995, that the foundation of the new cathedral was laid.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Trinity_Cathedral_of_Tbilisi
Name: Ananuri Fortress Complex
Location: Ananuri, Georgia
Ananuri is a castle complex on the Aragvi River in Georgia, about 45 miles from Tbilisi. Ananuri was a castle and seat of the eristavis (Dukes) of Aragvi, a feudal dynasty which ruled the area from the 13th century. The castle was the scene of numerous battles.

In 1739, Ananuri was attacked by forces from a rival duchy, commanded by Shanshe of Ksani and was set on fire. The Aragvi clan was massacred. However, four years later, the local peasants revolted against rule by the Shamshe, killing the usurpers and inviting King Teimuraz II to rule directly over them. However, in 1746, King Teimuraz was forced to suppress another peasant uprising, with the help of King Erekle II of Kakheti. The fortress remained in use until the beginning of the 19th century.

The fortifications consist of two castles joined by a crenellated curtain wall. The upper fortification with a large square tower, known as Sheupovari, is well preserved and is the location of the last defense of the Aragvi against the Shamshe. The lower fortification, with a round tower, is mostly in ruins.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ananuri
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN GEORGIA / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO GEORGIA.
FACTS:
Official Languages: Georgian / Abkhaz
Currency: Georgian Lari (GEL)
Time zone: MSK (Moscow Standard Time) (UTC+3) / GET (Georgia Standard Time) (UTC+4)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +995
Local / up-to-date weather in Tbilisi (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Georgia travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Georgia, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO GEORGIA.

The national currency is the Georgian lari, denoted by the symbol “₾” or sometimes by “ლ” (ISO currency code: GEL). It is divided into 100 tetri. Banknotes are issued in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 lari, and the rarely-used 200 and 500 lari. Coins are issued in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50 tetri, and 1, 2 lari.

There are two issues of the 20, 50 and 100 lari notes: from 2004 and (in stronger colours) from 2016. Both are valid, and no date has yet been announced for withdrawal of the older notes, but you obviously don’t want to leave the country with these. Indeed it’s difficult to redeem any form of Georgian currency outside of Europe.

Always have small money with you. 50 or 100 lari notes or so, might be difficult to use for payment, especially with taxi drivers. But the latter is often just an excuse not to give change, just ask ahead if the taxi driver has change.

Many Georgians are not very good with numbers and money. Don’t bother paying amounts of money, so you get back an even amount, like 10.75 if you owe 7.75. That will confuse them infinitely, and you will never get your desired change.

Money exchange:

Exchange kiosks in Tbilisi and Kutaisi generally have only a 1% spread between “buy” and “sell” for major currencies like US dollars or euros. Rates for others e.g. Turkish lira, or outside of cities, may be much worse. The kiosk may ask for your ID, but usually won’t for routine amounts.

ATMs:

ATMs are available countrywide and cards providers like Visa are generally a good idea having. In smaller cities or village the ATMs become more sparse. Never accept on-site currency conversion at ATMs, always let your bank do the exchange. ATM rates can be more than 7% or worse. Your foreign bank is usually 0.5-1.5% off, in addition to the credit card fee.

Apparently only Bank of Georgia charges 2 lari extra for cash withdrawals at ATMs.

ON FOOT AND NAVIGATION:

Georgia is an excellent place for hiking and trekking, providing many interesting trails. Tusheti, Kazbegi, or Borjomi, just to name some destinations. However, due to the often remote nature of these trails, it is important that you are well prepared and have a proper and reliable map with you. In addition, using GPS adds an extra layer of safety, both in cities as well as the countryside. For reliable (offline) maps and comprehensive trails and map information, consult OpenStreetMap, which is also used by this travel guide, and by many mobile Apps like OsmAnd (complex with many add-ons) and MAPS.ME (easy but limited).

BY MARSHRUTKAS:

Minibuses or marshrutkas are the most common way to travel and operate on established routes. After finding out the number of your route, flag down a marshrutka on the street by holding out your hand, palm facing down. Tip: start early, because minibuses/marshrutkas mostly run in the morning and become sparse in the afternoon. After 16:00 it can be hard to catch a bus to/from Tbilisi. Exceptions are the overnight buses, e.g. to Baku or Turkey, which may leave late in the day.

There are also minibus lines from city to city. Their routes end usually at bus stations and city markets. Their destination is written in Georgian, on a sign in the front window. Ask marshrutka drivers if you cannot find the minibus you are looking for.

BY TRAIN:

Georgian Railway (GR) has an extensive network of trains in Georgia; see the GR website for connections and ticket. Also, there is a GR app, which has connections and tickets, but not all of the connections. Both are in Georgian, Russian and English. Unfortunately, the schedule timetable on the website is in Georgian, but contains more connections than the app—use Google Translator. There are two types of trains: fast (with limited places, almost always modern) or local (slow and old but very cheap with unlimited places). There is also night trains available, between Zugdidi or Batumi and Tbilisi, and Tbilisi and Yerevan or Baku.

BY TAXI:

Taxis in Georgia are a convenient method of travel, and they are very cheap. Trips within Tbilisi range from 3 to 5 lari, depending on distance, and you can negotiate a price with the cab drivers. The vast majority of taxis in Georgia used to be unofficial “gypsy cabs”, driven by anyone looking to make some money. Such unmarked taxi services in Georgia were generally safe and widely used by foreigners living and visiting the country. Drivers would, however, exaggerate the price for foreigners and so it was best to establish the destination and price before getting in the car. The situation changed a few years ago when all official taxis were obligated to install meters with fixed rates.

BY BICYCLE:

As the country is relatively mountainous, you should consider a mountain bike. Many roads remain unpaved. But by bike allows you to reach more remote regions. You can rent mountain bikes in bigger towns, for example at the Jomardi club in Tbilisi.

BY PLANE:

Georgia has domestic flights, though they’re seldom convenient. Georgian Airways fly once a week between Tbilisi International Airport TBS and Batumi. There are other flights, in rinky-dinky light aircraft, to the mountain resorts of Mestia and Ambrolauri, from Natakhtari airfield on the northern edge of Tbilisi and from Batumi.

BY RENTAL CAR:

Many of the big rental companies like SIXT, Dollar, and AVIS are present in Georgia. However, their prices are as high as in Western Europe. Otherwise, you might want to try Renton.ge or local rental (ask your ho(s)tel), which have rates from 100 lari per day with full cover.

EAT:

Georgian traditional cuisine is delicious, cheap, and universal. It is also justly famous throughout the former Soviet Union (visitors to Moscow will have noticed the large number of Georgian restaurants). Georgia fills a list of wonderful, often meat, dishes, usually flavored with garlic, coriander, walnuts, and dill. A traditional Georgian feast (supra) is a sight to behold, with a spread that no group could finish, accompanied by at least 20 toasts set to wine or brandy.

Just wandering into the likeliest looking local joint in any neighborhood whatsoever, even just a block or two from the main tourist streets, will inevitably provide an excellent dining experience at bargain prices – and quite possibly any amount of proud attention and invitations to drink wine from staff and regulars delighted that a foreigner has discovered their haunt. Simply pick by random off the menu and let the unique tastes of Georgia surprise you. Western-style dishes (pizzas, hamburgers, etc.) are usually a pale copy of the originals. It is much better to try local food.

Popular dishes:

  • Khinkali. – Dumplings with different fillings: minced spiced meat, mushrooms, cheese, or vegetables, served in enormous quantities. But not like what you are used to doing with dumplings. Georgian men will easily eat 15 huge dumplings, and begin by seasoning the dumplings with pepper. Then grab the dumpling however you like, from the top “handle” if it pleases you (locals often stick a fork in the side of the knot so as not to puncture the dumpling), and take a small bite out of the side to slurp up the juice. Do not let any juice fall on your plate, or you will get your chin messy. Then, still holding the khinkali, eat around the top, finishing the dumpling and then placing the twisted top on your plate—traditionally the top is not eaten. It is also nice to look with pride upon all your tops once, with practice, you get into the double digits with these dumplings. Wash them down with wine, Kazbegi beer, or a “limonati” of whichever flavour you prefer (most common flavours are lemon, pear, and estragon/tarragon—which is quite refreshing).
  • Khachapuri – A cheese filled bread, which more resembles cheese pie. It comes in at least three different varieties:
    • imeruli or imeretian: These are the most common and often come with every meal, just filled with cheese. Often circular, similar to Lobiani.
    • megrelian: Like imeruli but topped with additional cheese.
    • adjarian: Boat-shaped like puri (break) with an open face and filled with egg in addition to cheese. This one is much more filling and a single proper dish.
  • Lobiani – A dish of bean-filled bread. Imeretian, again, is just cheese-filled. But most popular is Rachuli Lobiani (რაჭული ლობიანი), like a Khachapuri, but with bean and bacon. One is mostly too much for one person.

Any one of these just listed dishes beyond 5 lari in a reasonably priced local restaurant is probably too much for 1 person. So, you better combine only one dish with salad and drinks for two people.

Meat dishes:

  • Chkmeruli – A delicious chicken in garlic sauce.
  • Satsivi – Chicken in walnut sauce.
  • Mtsvadi – Like Shashlik, tasty grilled chunks of marinaded pork or veal on stick with onions, is another staple.
  • Kupati – A spicy sausage popular all over Georgia.
  • Kuchmachi – A dish made from chicken livers, hearts and gizzards, with walnuts and pomegranate seeds for topping.
  • Chanakhi – A stew made out of lamb, tomatoes, aubergine, potato and spices, and simply delicious.
  • Chakapuli – A stew made from lamb chops or veal, onions, tarragon leaves, cherry plums or tkemali (cherry plum sauce), dry white wine, and mixed fresh herbs (parsley, mint, dill, coriander), equally good.
  • Chakhokhbili – The word means pheasant, stewed chicken and tomatoes with fresh herbs.
  • Chashushuli – Beef stew with tomatoes, similar to but better than goulash.
  • Ojakhuri – The word means meat and roasted potatoes. Usually comes with pork, but vegetarian mushroom ojakhuri is not unheard of.
  • Kalia – A hot dish made from beef, onions and pomegranate.

Vegetarian dishes:

There are lots of vegetarian dishes (mostly in western parts of Georgia) which are quite tasty and accompany most of local parties with heavy wine drinking.

  • Ajapsandali – A sort of vegetable ratatouille, made differently according to each family’s recipe, and which is wonderful.
  • Lobio – Like a local version of hummus, made from beans (cooked or stewed), coriander, walnuts, garlic, and onions. Order some marinades with it!
  • (Nigvziani) Badrijani – A fried eggplant stuffed with spiced walnut and garlic paste, often topped with pomegranate seeds.
  • Pkhali – A dish of chopped and minced veges (cabbage, eggplant, spinach, beans, beets), combined with ground walnuts, vinegar, onions, garlic, and herbs.
  • Sulguni – A brined, sour, moderately salty flavored cheese with a dimpled texture and elastic consistency from the Samegrelo region. Often served as side dish.
  • Ghomi and Baje – Made of cornmeal and corn flour, similar to porridge, usually served with cheese. Try it with Baje, a nut sauce.
  • Soko Ketsze – Fried mushrooms.
  • Akhali Kartopili – Young potatoes roasted, mostly in early May.

Try these sauces, both with vegetarian and meat dishes:

  • Masharaphi – Pomegranate sauce
  • Tkemali – Plum sauce

Bread and pastry:

  • (Shotis) Puri – Most regular bread found in Georgia, made of white flour, and shaped like a canoe.
  • Mchadi – Cornbread often eaten together with Lobio.
  • (Tarkhunis) Ghvezeli – A quick snack, pastry stuffed with meat, potatoes, cheese or other ingredients, usually sold in markets and on the side of the street.
  • Nazuki – A sweet and spicy bread with cinnamon, lemon curds and raisins. Commonly found in Shida Kartli, especially in Surami.

Sweets:

  • Churchkhela – A candle-shaped candy made of grape must, nuts, and flour. 1.5-2 lari.
  • Gozinaki – A confection made of caramelized nuts (usually walnuts), fried in honey, but exclusively served on New Year’s Eve and Christmas.
  • Tklapi – A puréed fruit roll-up leather, spread thinly onto a sheet and sun-dried on a clothesline. It can be sour or sweet.
  • Pelamushi – A porridge made during harvest time with flour and pressed, condensed grape juice.
  • Koliva aka Korkoti – Wheat grains boiled in milk with raisins.
  • Kaklucha – Hard to find, also called Pearls of the Sun, caramelized walnuts.
  • Nugbari – Candy and also the brand name.

Fruit and vegetables:

The fruit and vegetables here are bursting at the seams with flavor, and very cheap. Specifically grown in this region and a must are kaki, pomegranate and grapes. Also try dried fruits, available at many markets.

Even if you only speak English and stand out as a foreigner like a slug in a spotlight, you can get fruit and vegetables in the market for a mere fraction of what you would pay in, say, Western Europe. Grabbing a quick meal of tomatoes, fresh cheese, puri (bread), and fruit is perhaps the most rewarding meal to have in the country.

Home food:

If you can, try to get yourself invited to dinner at someone’s home (this is not too difficult in Georgia, owing to their hospitality and general desire to stuff foreign visitors full of all the food they can afford). The food in restaurants is an odd set piece of the same dishes over and over. But Georgian cuisine is far richer, and has an untold number of dishes to try, prepared from scratch with fresh, locally grown products (although supermarkets are now spreading throughout Georgia).

DRINK:

Chacha:

Chacha (ჭაჭა) is a home-made fruit-based distilled clear spirit analogous to Italian grappa. Chacha is made of grape pomace (grape residue left after making wine). It can also be produced from non-ripe or non-cultured grapes and in some cases fig, tangerine, orange or mulberry. It is usually bottled “manually”. It can be purchased in corner markets, Farmers Markets, back alleys and basements throughout Georgia. There is also commercially-made chacha that can be found in some shops and supermarkets. The term “Chacha” is used in Georgia to refer to any type of clear spirit made of fruits.

Wine:

Georgia has one of the oldest wine-making traditions in the world and has been called the birthplace of wine (also as “Cradle of Wine”), due to archaeological findings which indicate wine production back to 5000 BC. Georgia produces some of the best wines in the world, and thanks to the ancient tradition of wine production and amazing climate, it holds its own with French and Italian wines. Georgian wines are quite famous. It may be true that they are little known in the West, but they certainly are famous among the roughly 280 million people in the former Soviet Union, where Georgian wines remain a welcome drink at any dining table.

Export of home-bottled wine, which is often the best type, is prohibited.

Red:

  • Saperavi (საფერავი sah-peh-rah-vee)
  • Mukuzani (მუკუზანი moo-k’oo-zah-nee)
  • Khvanchkara (ხვანჭკარა khvahnch-k’ah-rah) – semi-sweet
  • Kindzmarauli (კინძმარაული keendz-mah-rah-oo-lee) – semi-sweet

White:

  • Tsinandali (წინანდალი ts’ee-nahn-dah-lee)
  • Kakheti (კახეთი k’ah-kheh-tee)
  • Tbilisuri (თბილისური tbee-lee-soo-ree)

Imports of Georgian wine and mineral water have been banned by the Russian government, because of the political tension between the two counties.

Beer:

Georgia produces a growing number of local beers. A beer tradition has existed in Georgia since ancient times in the mountainous regions of Khevsureti and Tusheti. After independence from the Soviet Union, Georgia revived its beer production and introduced its high quality beers to the market. The first and most popular Georgian beer was Kazbegi. Today, beer production in Georgia is still growing, offering high quality beers (thanks to the high quality mountain spring waters in Georgia and to German designed beer factories). There are also many foreign beers such as Heineken, Bitburger, Lowenbrau, Guinness, etc.

Georgian beer:

  • Aluda
  • Argo
  • Batumuri
  • Bavariis Herzogi
  • Kasri
  • Kazbegi (ყაზბეგი q’ahz-beh-gee)
  • Khevsuruli
  • Lomisi
  • Natakhtari
  • Tushuri

Mineral waters:

Georgian mineral waters have exceptional and interesting tastes, which are very different from French and Italian varieties. The most famous Georgian mineral waters are Borjomi (ბორჯომი bohr-joh-mee), Likani (ლიკანი lick-ah-nee), and Nabeglavi (ნაბეღლავი nah-beh-ghlah-vee). But there is a plethora of less well-known springs located in small towns and alongside roads throughout the country that is worth sampling. Borjomi isn’t just ordinary sparkling water as it has a very high fluoride content and it may take some time to get used to the taste. It is however quite popular also outside Georgia (in the former Soviet republics).

Lagidze waters (soft drink):

Mitrofan Lagidze (ლაღიძე lah-ghee-dzeh) is a surname of a famous Georgian businessman of the 19th century who produced very popular soft drinks in Georgia. Nowadays these waters are called “the Lagidze Waters”. Lagidze soft drinks are made only with natural fruit components, without any chemical, artificial sugars or other additives. The most popular flavours are estragon/tarragon and cream & chocolate.

The number of major Western hotels and also budget hostels is growing every year, and not only in Tbilisi, but also in Batumi and other Georgian cities. Throughout much of the countryside, however, private homes are the cheapest and most enjoyable option, though this option is very much a home-stay; expect little privacy.

Since many hostel-like places are popping up rapidly, they are often poorly signposted, and from the outside a great hostel might look like an ordinary apartment. Hence, make sure beforehand to get a detailed description (including GPS) of where to find the place and which apartment to ring at—90% of the time GPS and address are correct. Otherwise, you might be lost forever and even locals won’t know where this newly popped up place is. On the other hand, there are countless guesthouses all over the country, often marked with a guest house sign. So, don’t bother too much about booking ahead, go with the flow and see where you end up.

Check prices on the usual reservation websites and turn up on site stating the price; owners will happily give you the online rate, so they can skip the fee the pay on such websites. Use Viber or Facebook Messenger to communicate with them.

  • Gold & other jewellery – Gold, silver, handmade & other miscellaneous jewellery and precious stones are very cheap in Georgia and the quality of the precious stones, gold and silver is superb.
  • Art & paintings – Georgian artists, such as Pirosmani, Gigo Gabashvili, David Kakabadze, Lado Gudiashvili, Korneli Sanadze, Elene Akhvlediani, Sergo Kobuladze, Simon Virsaladze, Ekaterine Baghdavadze and others, are famous for their work. In Georgia you will find many art shops, paintings and painters who sell their works on the streets. Their work is of high quality and is often very good value.
  • Antiques & other miscellaneous gifts – In Georgia you will able to find many antiques not only from Georgia, but Middle Eastern, Mediterranean, Russian and European as well.
  • Georgian wine, as much as you can. Georgia is the cradle of wine making, and with 521 original varieties of grape you will be sure to find excellent wines.
  • Cognac. Georgian cognac is unique as it is made from Georgian wine. Try Saradjishvili ‘Tbilisi’ cognac.
  • When heading outside the cities, you might find hand-made carpets for sale.
  • Georgians love to drink, so the country has a seemingly infinite number of beers, wines, liquors and distilled drinks. To take home, buy a bottle of chacha, a potent grape vodka somewhat similar to Lebanese Arak, Italian grappa or German obstler.

Georgian export commodities (especially wine and mineral water) used to be widely counterfeited in the domestic and former Soviet Union markets. For example, the Borjomi bottling plant used to produce roughly one million bottles of Borjomi per year, but there were three million bottles sold in Russia alone!

In 2007, the government and business groups began a large-scale fight against counterfeit wine and mineral water so the sale of counterfeit products has almost been eliminated. However, when stocking up on bottled wine, it is best to buy it at large supermarkets which have better control of their procurement than smaller stores. Such supermarkets are Goodwill, Big Ben or Populi. The same applies to mineral water.

The quality of wine making improved immensely following re-orientation of wine exports to EU markets.

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Georgia
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Narikala
Location: Tbilisi, Georgia
Narikala is an ancient fortress overlooking Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, and the Kura River. The fortress consists of two walled sections on a steep hill between the sulphur baths and the botanical gardens of Tbilisi. On the lower court there is the recently restored St Nicholas church. Newly built in 1996–1997, it replaces the original 13th-century church that was destroyed in a fire. The new church is of "prescribed cross" type, having doors on three sides. The internal part of the church is decorated with the frescos showing scenes both from the Bible and history of Georgia.

The fortress was established in the 4th century as Shuris-tsikhe (i.e. "Invidious Fort") and it was a Persian citadel. It was considerably expanded by the Umayyads in the 7th century and later, by king David the Builder (1089–1125). The Mongols renamed it "Narin Qala" (i.e. "Little Fortress"). Most of extant fortifications date from the 16th and 17th centuries. In 1827, parts of the fortress were damaged by an earthquake and demolished.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narikala
Name: Holy Trinity Cathedral
Location: Tbilisi, Georgia
The Holy Trinity Cathedral of Tbilisi commonly known as Sameba, is the main cathedral of the Georgian Orthodox Church located in Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia. Constructed between 1995 and 2004, it is the third-tallest Eastern Orthodox cathedral in the world and one of the largest religious buildings in the world by total area.

The idea to build a new cathedral to commemorate 1,500 years of autocephaly of the Georgian Orthodox Church and 2,000 years from the birth of Jesus emerged as early as 1989, a crucial year for the national awakening of the then-Soviet republic of Georgia. In May 1989, the Georgian Orthodox Patriarchate and the authorities of Tbilisi announced an international contest for the "Holy Trinity Cathedral" project. No winner was chosen at the first round of the contest when more than a hundred projects were submitted. Finally the design by architect Archil Mindiashvili won. The subsequent turbulent years of civil unrest in Georgia deferred this grandiose plan for six years, and it was not until November 23, 1995, that the foundation of the new cathedral was laid.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Trinity_Cathedral_of_Tbilisi
Name: Ananuri Fortress Complex
Location: Ananuri, Georgia
Ananuri is a castle complex on the Aragvi River in Georgia, about 45 miles from Tbilisi. Ananuri was a castle and seat of the eristavis (Dukes) of Aragvi, a feudal dynasty which ruled the area from the 13th century. The castle was the scene of numerous battles.

In 1739, Ananuri was attacked by forces from a rival duchy, commanded by Shanshe of Ksani and was set on fire. The Aragvi clan was massacred. However, four years later, the local peasants revolted against rule by the Shamshe, killing the usurpers and inviting King Teimuraz II to rule directly over them. However, in 1746, King Teimuraz was forced to suppress another peasant uprising, with the help of King Erekle II of Kakheti. The fortress remained in use until the beginning of the 19th century.

The fortifications consist of two castles joined by a crenellated curtain wall. The upper fortification with a large square tower, known as Sheupovari, is well preserved and is the location of the last defense of the Aragvi against the Shamshe. The lower fortification, with a round tower, is mostly in ruins.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ananuri
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN GEORGIA / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

Global Immigration Leader, Big 4

“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

Internal stakeholder, Big 4

“Manny is a big reason why the move from (external provider) to the UK firm’s passport and visa provision has been so smooth. He’s an extremely likeable honest hard working guy who takes his role very seriously. We’re very fortunate to have him leading our dedicated team”

External client, Private practice

“Most of my contact was with Manpreet Singh Johal. He did the best job someone could imagine. Extraordinary service from his side.”

Team member, Big 4

“Working on two priority accounts is naturally pressurised especially where he has also been responsible for billing on both accounts; yet Manny delivers every time and this I believe is an exceptional quality.”

Please think before printing – click here for more info

WEB LINKS

LOCATIONS