GHANA

GHANA

GHANA

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Name: Kakum National Park
Location: Ghana
Kakum National Park, located in the coastal environs of the Central Region of Ghana, covers an area of 375 square kilometres. The area is covered with tropical forest. The uniqueness of this park lies in the fact that it was established at the initiative of the local people and not by the State Department of wildlife who are responsible for wildlife preservation in Ghana. It is one of only 3 locations in Africa with a canopy walkway, which is 350 metres long and connects seven tree tops which provides access to the forest.

The most notable endangered species of fauna in the park are Diana monkey, giant bongo antelope, yellow-backed duiker and African elephant. The bird inventory confirmed 266 species in the park, including eight species of global conservation concern. One of these species of concern is the white-breasted guineafowl. Nine species of hornbill and the grey parrot have been recorded. It is very rich in butterflies as well, and a new species was discovered in 1993. As of 2012, the densest population of forest elephants in Ghana is located in Kakum.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kakum_National_Park
Name: Aburi Botanical Gardens
Location: Aburi, Ghana
Aburi Botanical Gardens is a botanical garden in Aburi in Eastern region of South Ghana.

The garden occupies an area of 64.8 hectares. It was opened in March, 1890. Before the garden was established, it was the site of a sanatorium built in 1875 for Gold Coast government officials. During the governorship of William Brandford-Griffith, a Basel missionary supervised clearing of land around the sanatorium to start the Botanic Department. In 1890 William Crowther, a student from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, was appointed the garden's first curator. The gardens played an important role in encouraging cocoa production in South Ghana, by supplying cheap cocoa seedlings and information about scientific farming methods. After Hevea brasiliensis was sent to Aburi from Kew in 1893, the gardens also encouraged rubber production in Ghana.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aburi_Botanical_Gardens
Name: Cape Coast Castle
Location: Cape Coast, Ghana
Cape Coast Castle is one of about forty "slave castles", or large commercial forts, built on the Gold Coast of West Africa (now Ghana) by European traders. It was originally built by the Swedes for trade in timber and gold, but later used in the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Other Ghanaian slave castles include Elmina Castle and Fort Christiansborg. They were used to hold slaves before they were loaded onto ships and sold in the Americas, especially the Caribbean.

The large quantity of gold dust found in Ghana was what primarily attracted Europe, and many natives of Cape Coast used this to their advantage. In exchange for gold, mahogany, their own people and other local items, the natives received clothing, blankets, spices, sugar, silk and many other items.

At the time slaves were a valuable commodity in the Americas and elsewhere, and slaves became the principal item traded in Cape Coast. Due to this, many changes were made to Cape Coast Castle. One of the alterations was the addition of large underground dungeons that could hold as many as a thousand slaves awaiting export.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Coast_Castle
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN GHANA / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
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COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO GHANA.
FACTS:
Official Languages: English
Currency: Ghanaian Cedi (GHS)
Time zone: GMT (UTC)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +233
Local / up-to-date weather in Accra (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Ghana travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Ghana, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO GHANA.

The new Ghana cedi, denoted by the symbol “GH₵” (ISO currency code: GHS) was introduced on 1 July 2007 at a rate equal to 10,000 old cedis. When it was introduced, it was the highest-valued currency unit issued by a sovereign African country.

You will encounter a variety of currency notations locally. Banknotes are issued in 50, 20, 10, 5, 2 and 1 new Ghana cedi denominations.

One new Ghana cedi is divided into one hundred new Ghana pesewas (Gp). Coins of GH₵1, 0.50 0.20, 0.10, 0.05 and 0.01 circulate. The one pesewa coins are rare in the system since you hardly find items that can be bought for less than 5 pesewas.

Many Ghanaians still think in old currency. This can be very confusing (and costly). Ten thousand old cedis are habitually referred to as ten (or twenty, or thirty). This would, today, be one, two, or three “new” Ghana cedis. So always think whether the quoted price makes sense before buying or agreeing on a taxi fare. If in doubt ask whether this is new cedis.

US dollars are accepted by some of the major tourist hotels, but you shouldn’t rely on this. As in all West African countries, older US dollar bills will be rejected by banks and Forex bureaus. If you intend to take dollar notes make sure that they are all from the 2009 series or above.

Euros, dollars and pounds sterling in cash are the most useful currencies to take with you and are easily and safely changed at numerous air con booths open to 21:00.

There are many Forex Bureaus in Accra, and a few in the other major cities. It is very difficult to change travellers cheques and certainly almost impossible outside Accra and Kumasi, unless you change them at a major bank. Barclays has branches in Accra, Kumasi, Cape Coast, and even Tamale where you can change travelers cheques. Expect lines.

ATMs:

There are Ecobank, Barclays Bank, Standard Chartered bank, Stanbic bank, GT bank ATMs all over Ghana. which accept Master card/Visa card. At the main branch of Barclays Bank in Accra you can get a cash advance on your Visa or MasterCard provided you have your passport with you. You can use Master card and visa cards in hotels and some shopping malls and airlines offices.

Credit card fraud is very common in many places, so be careful.

BY PLANE:

Domestically, the air transportation scene in Ghana is very dynamic and appears to go through regular changes. As of October 2019 there are only two registered carriers – Passion Air servicing Accra, Kumasi & Tamale, and Africa World Airlines who service these same centres in addition to Takoradi. All aircraft are of a high standard, as is the service level of airline staff, flights run on time and are reasonably priced. Note: at this time there are no scheduled services to Sunyani or Obuasi.

BY TRAIN:

There are rail links between Accra, Takoradi and Kumasi however, as of October 2010, all railways have been suspended except those travelling from Accra to Nsawam (four times a day, Monday through Saturday) and from Accra to Tema (twice a day, Monday through Saturday). These are mostly used as commuter trains for residents. The railway system is being renovated, so the other routes are expected to reopen to passengers when everything is complete.

BY CAR:

Roads are variable. In Accra most are fairly good. Significant improvements are being made on the main road between Accra and Kumasi. Most of the roads outside Accra apart from the major ones are dirt tracks. The road between Techiman and Bole is particularly bad and should be avoided if possible. For travel on most roads in the North of the country a 4×4 is required, a saloon car will cope with some of them in the dry season but is not recommended.

Cars with foreign registration are not allowed to circulate at night 18:00-06:00. Only Ghanaian registered vehicles are allowed on the road at this time. Non compliance can result in fines and the impounding of the vehicle for the night.

BY BUS:

With the collapse of the state owned transport company (STC), many private own companies are springing up and providing better service to passengers. Companies such as VIP Bus, O.A. Travel and Tours, M Plaza, Diplomatic Transport etc ply the major cities and towns of the country. The VIP bus company is now the major carrier between Accra, Kumasi, Sunyani, Takoradi etc. Fare depends on preferred company and destination of travel. Most of these buses are a/c coaches, there are no advance tickets and there are meal and wash-room stops when aboard.

However these private buses don’t travel to rural areas of the country. Metro bus which is a state company is by far the cheapest means of travel to consider when travelling between towns.

BY TRO-TRO:

A ‘tro-tro’ is almost any sort of vehicle that has been adapted to fit in as many people, possessions, and occasionally livestock, as possible. Tro-tros are typically old, 12-passenger VW or Mercedes-Benz vans. Similarly to ‘shared’ taxis, tro-tros will run along fixed routes and have fixed fares, and will rarely run with less than capacity [so be prepared to wait]. They are inexpensive (cheaper than shared taxis and STC buses) and fares should reflect distance travelled, however they have a questionable safety record and frequently breakdown. Breakdowns however are usually not too much of a problem since they will break down in a route where other tro-tros run, so you can just grab another one. Although they generally run point to point they will usually pick and drop on route if required. They make runs within the city (i.e. Circle to Osu for GH₵0.20) as well as intercity routes. They are often the only option between remote towns but are not recommended for long journeys. Tro-tros are an excellent way to meet Ghanaians, and are always great for a cultural adventure. Sometimes they will make you pay extra for luggage, and occasionally they will try to overcharge (very rarely).

If you feel like being an elite tro-tro rider, ask around for City Express, a newish service sporting the usual minivan, but with working breaks, non-stop travel, half the seats, and impressive air conditioning. It mostly runs between the larger cities along the coast, e.g., Takoradi, Accra, Aflao, et al.

BY TAXI:

Taxis are prevalent, easy to spot, safe, and as a tourist you will find they find you quick enough if you need one. To charter a taxi is more expensive than to share one, but prices are negotiable and almost always need to be bargained over. Always settle on a fare before getting in. A taxi for a very short route should be no more than GH₵1.00, longer GH₵2.50-5.00 and GH₵8.00 should be enough for most places in the city. As of December 2011, you can use a rough rate of GH₵1.00 for every 1.5 km travelled (check Google Maps for the distance between places). Fares continue to fluctuate with the fuel prices on the international market. Almost every taxi driver will start with a high price that is 1.5x-3x the local price if you’re a foreigner and then you’ll have to bargain them down. You’ll get the best price when you start to walk away from the taxi. In Accra and the major cities most taxis that will stop for you assume you require a charter taxi and unless you are on a very strict budget it’s usually easiest to do this. In more remote areas, shared taxis are most common.

EAT:

Traditional food is fun to try and easy to enjoy. Fufu, the most widely served traditional dish, consists of pounded balls of yam, plantain, or cassava served with a variety of soups and meat or fish stews. Soups are typically made of groundnuts, palm nut, okra and other vegetables. Banku is a fermented corn version of the dish typically eaten with grilled tilapia fish or okra soup.

Rice dishes are also typical, but not considered a “real” meal by many Ghanaians, males especially. Jollof rice is a dish as varied as its chef, but generally consists of white rice cooked with vegetables, meat pieces, spices in a tomato based sauce. Waakye is a mix of beans and rice, typically served with gari, a powder of ground cassava. Often rice dishes are served with shredded lettuce, cucumber and tomatoes on the side with a dollop of Heinz salad cream or mayonnaise. Such meals are extremely cheap from street vendors and cost GH₵1.50-2.50.

Plantains, yams, and sweet potatoes are prepared in various ways and serve as small snacks. Kelewele, a spiced fried plantain snack, is especially delicious. Fresh fruits such as pineapple, mango, papaya, coconut, oranges, and bananas are delightful when in season and come when applicable by the bag for as little as 10 cents.

A great African meal in a restaurant can cost GH₵3-7. For instance, a lobster and shrimp dinner can cost GH₵6. There are also a number of Western and Chinese style restaurants available especially in Osu, a trendy suburb of Accra.

There is also banku and tilapia.The price of the tilapia varies based on the size as well as where you buy it from. There are other local traditional meals that are not so common example are the Aprapransa, mpotompoto etc.

DRINK:

In Accra’s expat visited bars, a beer will cost GH₵2-4. Fruit juices GHS1.50, water GH₵1.00-1.50. Star and Club are two of the more popular beers served. For a more interesting and rewarding experience, visit a “spot,” a bar signified by the blue and white stripes on the outside of the building. They are cheaper and you will undoubtedly be able to meet some local Ghanaians as well as hear the newest hip-life songs.

A soft drink such as Coke, Alvaro, Fanta, 7UP (called “minerals” by locals) are widely available for GH₵0.70.

Be aware that the bottles that minerals or beer is served to you in are owned by the bottling company-if you do not return it to the seller, they stand to lose GHS0.50—more than you most likely paid for the drink. If you are not going to consume the drink at the “spot” or at the roadside stand, make sure you let the seller know. Often, you will be asked for a deposit which will be returned upon the return of the bottle.There also traditional drinks like “pito”, asaana or burkina, bisarrp drink (sobolo).

Bargaining is very much expected in the markets. Ask for a thirs of the price and work your way up from there.

Large cities such as Accra have markets open every day, but travellers get the true flavour of the country if they have the opportunity to visit a village market on the day of the week that it is open. Most goods will be staple goods, but cloth, beads, musical instruments, bags, and even CDs are usually available.

Kente cloth, drums and wooden designs, such as masks and “sacred stools” can be found on almost any street in any tourist area in Ghana.

The Accra Mall is a shopping centre situated on the spintex road of the Tetteh Quarshie Interchange.(www.accramall.com).

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Ghana
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Kakum National Park
Location: Ghana
Kakum National Park, located in the coastal environs of the Central Region of Ghana, covers an area of 375 square kilometres. The area is covered with tropical forest. The uniqueness of this park lies in the fact that it was established at the initiative of the local people and not by the State Department of wildlife who are responsible for wildlife preservation in Ghana. It is one of only 3 locations in Africa with a canopy walkway, which is 350 metres long and connects seven tree tops which provides access to the forest.

The most notable endangered species of fauna in the park are Diana monkey, giant bongo antelope, yellow-backed duiker and African elephant. The bird inventory confirmed 266 species in the park, including eight species of global conservation concern. One of these species of concern is the white-breasted guineafowl. Nine species of hornbill and the grey parrot have been recorded. It is very rich in butterflies as well, and a new species was discovered in 1993. As of 2012, the densest population of forest elephants in Ghana is located in Kakum.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kakum_National_Park
Name: Aburi Botanical Gardens
Location: Aburi, Ghana
Aburi Botanical Gardens is a botanical garden in Aburi in Eastern region of South Ghana.

The garden occupies an area of 64.8 hectares. It was opened in March, 1890. Before the garden was established, it was the site of a sanatorium built in 1875 for Gold Coast government officials. During the governorship of William Brandford-Griffith, a Basel missionary supervised clearing of land around the sanatorium to start the Botanic Department. In 1890 William Crowther, a student from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, was appointed the garden's first curator. The gardens played an important role in encouraging cocoa production in South Ghana, by supplying cheap cocoa seedlings and information about scientific farming methods. After Hevea brasiliensis was sent to Aburi from Kew in 1893, the gardens also encouraged rubber production in Ghana.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aburi_Botanical_Gardens
Name: Cape Coast Castle
Location: Cape Coast, Ghana
Cape Coast Castle is one of about forty "slave castles", or large commercial forts, built on the Gold Coast of West Africa (now Ghana) by European traders. It was originally built by the Swedes for trade in timber and gold, but later used in the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Other Ghanaian slave castles include Elmina Castle and Fort Christiansborg. They were used to hold slaves before they were loaded onto ships and sold in the Americas, especially the Caribbean.

The large quantity of gold dust found in Ghana was what primarily attracted Europe, and many natives of Cape Coast used this to their advantage. In exchange for gold, mahogany, their own people and other local items, the natives received clothing, blankets, spices, sugar, silk and many other items.

At the time slaves were a valuable commodity in the Americas and elsewhere, and slaves became the principal item traded in Cape Coast. Due to this, many changes were made to Cape Coast Castle. One of the alterations was the addition of large underground dungeons that could hold as many as a thousand slaves awaiting export.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Coast_Castle
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN GHANA / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

Global Immigration Leader, Big 4

“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

Internal stakeholder, Big 4

“Manny is a big reason why the move from (external provider) to the UK firm’s passport and visa provision has been so smooth. He’s an extremely likeable honest hard working guy who takes his role very seriously. We’re very fortunate to have him leading our dedicated team”

External client, Private practice

“Most of my contact was with Manpreet Singh Johal. He did the best job someone could imagine. Extraordinary service from his side.”

Team member, Big 4

“Working on two priority accounts is naturally pressurised especially where he has also been responsible for billing on both accounts; yet Manny delivers every time and this I believe is an exceptional quality.”

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