JORDAN

JORDAN

JORDAN

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Name: Petra
Location: Ma’an Governorate, Jordan
Petra originally known to its inhabitants as Raqmu, is a historical and archaeological city in southern Jordan. Petra lies on the slope of Jabal Al-Madbah. Petra is believed to have been settled as early as 9,000 BC, and it was possibly established in the 4th century BC as the capital city of the Nabataean Kingdom. The Nabataeans were nomadic Arabs who invested in Petra's proximity to the trade routes by establishing it as a major regional trading hub. The trading business gained the Nabataeans considerable revenue and Petra became the focus of their wealth.

It remained unknown to the world until it was rediscovered in 1812 by Johann Ludwig Burckhardt.

The city is accessed through a 1.2-kilometre-long (0.75 mi) gorge called the Siq. Famous for its rock-cut architecture and water conduit system, Petra is also called the Rose City due to the color of the stone out of which it is carved. UNESCO has described it as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage". Petra is a symbol of Jordan, as well as Jordan's most-visited tourist attraction; around 800,000 tourists visited the site in 2018.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petra
Name: Amman Citadel
Location: Amman, Jordan
The Amman Citadel is a historical site in Amman, Jordan. The hill is one of the seven jabals (mountains) that originally made up Amman. Evidence of occupation since the pottery Neolithic period has been found. It was inhabited by different peoples and cultures until the time of the Umayyads, after which came a period of decline and for much of the time until 1878 the former city became an abandoned pile of ruins. Despite this gap, the Citadel of Amman is considered to be among the world's oldest continuously inhabited places.

The Citadel is considered an important site because it has had a long history of occupation by many great civilizations. Most of the buildings still visible at the site are from the Roman, Byzantine, and Umayyad periods. The major buildings at the site are the Temple of Hercules, a Byzantine church, and the Umayyad Palace.

Though the fortification walls enclose the heart of the site, the ancient periods of occupation covered large areas. Historic structures, tombs, arches, walls and stairs have no modern borders, and therefore there is considerable archaeological potential at this site.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amman_Citadel
Name: Wadi Rum
Location: Aqaba, Jordan
Wadi Rum, known also as the Valley of the Moon, is a valley cut into the sandstone and granite rock in southern Jordan 60 km (37 mi) to the east of Aqaba; it is the largest wadi in Jordan.

Shots of Wadi Rum in Lawrence of Arabia from 1962 kick-started Jordan's tourism industry.

Wadi Rum is home to the Zalabia Bedouin who, working with climbers and trekkers, have made a success of developing eco-adventure tourism as their main source of income. The area is one of Jordan's important tourist destinations, and attracts an increasing number of foreign tourists, particularly trekkers and climbers, but also for camel and horse safari or simply day-trippers from Aqaba or Petra. Its luxury camping retreats have also spurred more tourism to the area. Popular activities in the desert environment include camping under the stars, riding Arabian horses, hiking and rock-climbing among the massive rock formations. All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) and Jeeps are also available and new camps have opened that offer accommodation for tourists. Dima and Lama Hattab coordinate an annual marathon in the region called Jabal Ishrin.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wadi_Rum
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN JORDAN / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

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COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO JORDAN.
FACTS:
Official Languages: Arabic
Currency: Jordan Dinar (JOD)
Time zone: EET (UTC+2) / EEST (UTC+3)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +962
Local / up-to-date weather in Amman (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Jordan travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Jordan, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO JORDAN.

The currency is the Jordanian dinar, locally denoted by the symbol “JD” before or after the amount or in Arabic as دينار, or sometimes “£” (ISO currency code: JOD). It is divided into 1000 fils and 100 piastres (or qirsh). Coins come in denominations of 1 (almost non existent), 5 and piastres and ¼ JD, ½ JD. Banknotes are found in 1, 5, 10, 20, and 50 JD denominations. The currency rate is effectively fixed to the US dollar at an artificially high rate (about $1.412 ≈ 1.00 JD) that makes Jordan poorer value than it would otherwise be. Most upper scale restaurants and shops at shopping malls also accept US dollars.

Many places have limited change so it is important to keep a quantity of 1 JD and 5 notes JD. As bank machines give 20 JD and 50 JD notes for large transactions, this can be difficult.

Cards are accepted in a limited (and seemingly random) way. Most hotels and hostels take cards including Petra entry fees (50 JD and more) and at camps in Wadi Rum.

ATMs are commonly available, but might charge a fee of up to 7 JD, especially the ATM at the airport right before the visa counter which you have to use to withdraw money to pay for the visa(-on-arrival), except for when you have a Jordan Pass. Try several machines to find one with the lowest or without any fee, and remember the bank. However, in case of Visa, sometimes these additional fees will not get collected back home. Probably mostly only ever if it states more on your receipt than you have received.

BY BUS:

The JETT bus company has services connecting Amman to Aqaba, the King Hussein Bridge (to cross into Israel), and Hammamat Ma’in. Private buses (mainly operated by the Hijazi company) run from Amman to Irbid and Aqaba. Minibus services connect smaller towns on a much more irregular service basis – usually they leave once they’re full.

The Abdali transport station near Downtown Amman served as a bus/taxi hub to locations throughout Jordan, but many of its services (especially microbus and service taxi) have been relocated to the new Northern bus station (also called Tarbarboor, or Tareq). Here you can find buses into Israel and a 1.5 JD bus to Queen Alia airport.

BY SERVICE TAXI:

Service taxis (servees) cover much the same routes as buses. Service taxis are definitely more expensive than minibuses, but a lot faster and more convenient.

Service taxis only leave when full so there is no set timetable. You may also be approached by private cars operating as service taxis. If you use one of these, it is important to agree the price in advance.

Service taxis are generally white or cream in colour. They can sometimes be persuaded to deviate from their standard route if they are not already carrying passengers. It is quite likely that you would be asked to wait for a yellow taxi though.

BY REGULAR TAXI:

Regular taxis are abundant in most cities. They are bright yellow (similar to New York yellow-cabs) and are generally in good condition. A 10 km trip should cost around 2 JD.

All yellow taxis should be metered, however most drivers outside Amman do not use them. If you do get picked up by such or even unmetered taxi, make sure you agree on the price before departing – per drive and not per person! If you do not agree on a price, you will most likely pay double the going rate. Using the meter is almost always cheaper than negotiating a price. So, it is best to insist that the driver uses it before you depart. Keep your luggage with you – it’s not uncommon for unmetered taxis to charge a ridiculous rate (30 JD for a 10-min ride) and then refuse to open the trunk to give you your bags back until you pay up.

Standardised but inflated taxi prices from the Eilat/Aqaba border crossing are:

  • Wadi Rum (one way) 39 JD
  • Wadi Rum (round trip including waiting time) 55 JD
  • Petra (one way) 55 JD
  • Petra (round trip including waiting time) 88 JD
  • Amman (and suburbs) 109 JD
    Dead Sea 99 JD

Although, it might be a better idea to take a taxi into Aqaba and from there take a different taxi and renegotiate the price.

Day rates for taxis can be negotiated. These are usually through specific taxi drivers that have offered the service to friends or colleagues before. If you are staying at a hotel, the reception desk should be able to find you a reliable driver. It is also quite common in quiet times to be approached (politely) by taxi drivers on the street looking for business. There are plenty of good English speakers so it pays to wait until you find one you like. Though, do not use taxi drivers as guides (read #Touting & Guides below).

A full day taxi fare should cost around 20-25 JD. An afternoon taxi fare would be around 15 JD. For this price the taxi driver will drop you off at local shopping areas and wait for you to return. You can then go to the next shopping location. You can leave your recently purchased items in the vehicle as the driver will remain in the taxi at all times, but it is not recommended to do so.

If you are planning a trip outside of Amman, the day rates will increase to offset the fuel costs. For day trips within 1–3 hours of Amman, a taxi is by far the easiest method of transport. A trip to Petra in a taxi would cost approximately 75 JD for 3 people. This would get you there and back with about 6 hours to look around and see the sights.

If travelling a long way try to use buses or coaches rather than taxis. Some taxi drivers are not averse to driving people into the middle of the desert and threatening to leave you there unless you give them all your money. This is very unlikely if you stick to recommended drivers however. Jordan is generally very protective of its tourists and while overcharging is common (if not agreed in advance), threats and cheating are rare.

BY CAR:

Jordan’s highways are generally in very good shape, but the same cannot be said about its drivers or its vehicles. Many trucks and buses drive with worn or defective tires and brakes and in the southern and more rural parts of the country there is the tendency for some people to drive at night without headlights (in the belief that they can see better and that this is therefore safer!).

Avoid driving outside the capital, Amman, after dark.

Renting a car should be inexpensive and not too time-consuming. Fuel prices are all fixed by the government, so don’t bother looking for cheaper gas stations. Expect to pay around 0.825 JD per litre (unleaded 90 octane), 1 JD per litre (unleaded 95 octane), of 0.625 JD for diesel (Oct 2018). They’re reviewed on a monthly basis to reflect international gas prices on the local prices.

The main route is the Desert Highway, which connects Aqaba, Ma’an and Amman and then continues all the way to Damascus in neighbouring Syria. Radar speed traps are plentiful and well positioned to catch drivers who do not heed the frequently changing speed limits. Traffic Police are stationed regularly at turns and curves, well hidden, with speed guns. If you are even 10 % over the speed limit, you will be stopped and made to pay a steep fine.

One particular stretch, where the road rapidly descends from the highlands of Amman to the valley that leads into Aqaba through a series of steep hairpin curves, is infamous for the number of badly maintained oil trucks that lose their brakes and careen off the road into the ravine, destroying all in their path. This stretch of the road has been made into a dual carriageway and is now a little safer. However, exercise caution on this stretch of the road.

The other route of interest to travellers is the King’s Highway, a meandering track to the west of the Desert Highway that starts south of Amman and links Kerak, Madaba, Wadi Mujib and Petra before joining the Desert Highway south of Ma’an.

BY PLANE:

The only domestic air route is between Amman and Aqaba.

ORGANISED TOURS:

Much of Jordan’s more dramatic scenery (Wadi Rum, the Dana Reserve and Iben Hamam) is best seen on 4×4 vehicles with drivers or guides familiar with the territory.

Most people visiting Jordan opt for organised tours, although it is possible to use local guides from the various visitors’ centres at Jordan’s eco-nature reserves. The majority of tourists crossing into Jordan from Israel are on one-day Petra tours or in organised tour groups. They make up a significant percent of the daily visitors in Petra and Jordan’s natural attractions.

BY TRAIN:

The Jordan Hejaz Railway is the only rail line operating passenger services. It is mostly a tourist attraction and not a means of practical transportation. In the 2010s Jordan has made some noise towards building new rail lines and neighboring Israel has built numerous new rail lines in the 1990s, 2000s and 2010s and has announced an intention to cooperate with Jordanian and/or Palestinian partners for cross-border services but as of 2018 nothing concrete has come of this.

EAT:

Jordanian cuisine is quite similar to fare served elsewhere in the region. The daily staple being khobez, a large, flat bread sold in bakeries across the country for a few hundred fils. Delicious when freshly baked.

For breakfast, the traditional breakfast is usually fried eggs, labaneh, cheese, zaatar and olive oil along with bread and a cup of tea. Falafel and hummus are eaten on the weekends by some and more often by others. There’s no convention for when you should or should not eat any type of food. It’s up to you. This is the most popular breakfast. Manousheh and pastries come in as the second most popular breakfast item. All of the hotels offer American breakfast.

The national dish of Jordan is the mansaf, prepared with jameed, a sun-dried yogurt. Grumpygourmet.com describes the mansaf as “an enormous platter layered with crêpe-like traditional “shraak” bread, mounds of glistening rice and chunks of lamb that have been cooked in a unique sauce made from reconstituted jameed and spices, sprinkled with golden pine nuts.” In actuality more people use fried almonds instead of pine nuts because of the cheaper price tag. The best mansaf can be found in Kerak.

While mansaf is the national dish, most people in urban areas eat it on special occasions and not every day. Other popular dishes include Maklouba, stuffed vegetables, freekeh.

Levantine-style mezza are served in “Lebanese-style” – which is typical to Jordanian style – restaurants around the country, and you can easily find international fast food chains. Some local businesses such ate:

  • Abu Jbarah: falafel restaurants
  • Al kalha: falafel and homous restaurant
  • Al-Daya’a and Reem: places to get shawerma sandwiches and dishes.

As for foreign style restaurants, there is no shortage of them. The best ones are usually found in 5-star hotels, but the price tag is high. Italian restaurants and pizza places are somewhat abundant in Amman, Madaba, and Aqaba, but are very hard to find in other cities.

More and more cafes now serve food. There is an abundance of Middle Eastern-style cafes serving Argeelleh in addition to the full complement of Western and Middle Eastern coffee drinks. There is also a good number of Western-style cafes which usually serve Western-style desserts, salads and sandwiches.

DRINK:

Although Jordan is an Islamic state, the locally brewed Amstel beer is available in the better restaurants. Guinness, Becks and Heiniken are served in bars catering for westerners. Jordanian wine, mostly from Mount Nebo, is also quite good. A few shops, especially in the touristic centres also sell harder alcohol. Liquor stores are generally identifiable by the Amstel logo. In touristic areas it is easy to find them, and only during Ramadan they might be closed. One exception is Wadi Rum, because there are no shops here, just camps, but the more luxurious ones will cater for such needs.

Amman has an abundance of 5- and 4-star hotels. In addition there is good number of 3-star hotels and there are plenty of 2-star and 1-star hotels in downtown Amman which are very cheap, and there are plenty of tourists, especially those that are passing by stay in these hotels.

There are two scales of rating the hotels in Jordan. There are the standard, Western-style 5-star hotels such as the Sheraton, Crowne Plaza, etc., and then there are the local 5-star establishments. The local establishments that are considered ‘5-star’ in Jordan would be more like 3-star hotels in the West. A traveller will pay top dollar for a Western brand-name 5-star hotel in Amman or Petra and less for the local 5-star hotel.

Furthermore, for longer stays it is possible to get furnished apartments for 200-600 JD a month.

Do not buy souvenirs in the touristic centres of the country, like Petra, Jerash or Amman – the prices here are inflated 2- or 3-fold. Madaba or Irbid might be good opportunities to get souvenirs.

Buying and exporting archaeological artefacts might be prohibited, like ancient coins. So, do not get into thinking you can make a good deal here. If you are not an expert, you might even end up buying fake genuine goods – just because they look old and the merchant talks lovely does not make them real.

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Jordan
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PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Petra
Location: Ma’an Governorate, Jordan
Petra originally known to its inhabitants as Raqmu, is a historical and archaeological city in southern Jordan. Petra lies on the slope of Jabal Al-Madbah. Petra is believed to have been settled as early as 9,000 BC, and it was possibly established in the 4th century BC as the capital city of the Nabataean Kingdom. The Nabataeans were nomadic Arabs who invested in Petra's proximity to the trade routes by establishing it as a major regional trading hub. The trading business gained the Nabataeans considerable revenue and Petra became the focus of their wealth.

It remained unknown to the world until it was rediscovered in 1812 by Johann Ludwig Burckhardt.

The city is accessed through a 1.2-kilometre-long (0.75 mi) gorge called the Siq. Famous for its rock-cut architecture and water conduit system, Petra is also called the Rose City due to the color of the stone out of which it is carved. UNESCO has described it as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage". Petra is a symbol of Jordan, as well as Jordan's most-visited tourist attraction; around 800,000 tourists visited the site in 2018.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petra
Name: Amman Citadel
Location: Amman, Jordan
The Amman Citadel is a historical site in Amman, Jordan. The hill is one of the seven jabals (mountains) that originally made up Amman. Evidence of occupation since the pottery Neolithic period has been found. It was inhabited by different peoples and cultures until the time of the Umayyads, after which came a period of decline and for much of the time until 1878 the former city became an abandoned pile of ruins. Despite this gap, the Citadel of Amman is considered to be among the world's oldest continuously inhabited places.

The Citadel is considered an important site because it has had a long history of occupation by many great civilizations. Most of the buildings still visible at the site are from the Roman, Byzantine, and Umayyad periods. The major buildings at the site are the Temple of Hercules, a Byzantine church, and the Umayyad Palace.

Though the fortification walls enclose the heart of the site, the ancient periods of occupation covered large areas. Historic structures, tombs, arches, walls and stairs have no modern borders, and therefore there is considerable archaeological potential at this site.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amman_Citadel
Name: Wadi Rum
Location: Aqaba, Jordan
Wadi Rum, known also as the Valley of the Moon, is a valley cut into the sandstone and granite rock in southern Jordan 60 km (37 mi) to the east of Aqaba; it is the largest wadi in Jordan.

Shots of Wadi Rum in Lawrence of Arabia from 1962 kick-started Jordan's tourism industry.

Wadi Rum is home to the Zalabia Bedouin who, working with climbers and trekkers, have made a success of developing eco-adventure tourism as their main source of income. The area is one of Jordan's important tourist destinations, and attracts an increasing number of foreign tourists, particularly trekkers and climbers, but also for camel and horse safari or simply day-trippers from Aqaba or Petra. Its luxury camping retreats have also spurred more tourism to the area. Popular activities in the desert environment include camping under the stars, riding Arabian horses, hiking and rock-climbing among the massive rock formations. All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) and Jeeps are also available and new camps have opened that offer accommodation for tourists. Dima and Lama Hattab coordinate an annual marathon in the region called Jabal Ishrin.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wadi_Rum
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN JORDAN / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

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...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

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We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

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