KUWAIT

KUWAIT

KUWAIT

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TOP ATTRACTIONS
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Name: Kuwait Towers
Location: Kuwait City, Kuwait
The Kuwait Towers are a group of three slender towers in Kuwait City, standing on a promontory into the Persian Gulf. They were the sixth, and last, group in the larger Kuwait Water Towers system of 34 towers (33 store water; one stores equipment), and were built in a style considerably different from the other five groups. The Kuwait Towers were officially inaugurated in March 1979 and are regarded as a landmark and symbol of modern Kuwait. The towers were closed for maintenance from March 2012 to 8 March 2016, with a massive fireworks festival commemorating the re-opening.

The main tower is 187 metres high and carries two spheres. The lower sphere holds in its bottom half a water tank of 4,500 cubic metres (1,200,000 US gal) and in its upper half there is a restaurant that accommodates 90 people, a café, a lounge and a reception hall. The upper sphere, which rises to 123 metres above sea level and completes a full turn every 30 minutes, holds a café. The second tower is 147 metres high and serves as a water tower. The third tower does not store water, housing equipment to illuminate the two larger towers.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kuwait_Towers
Name: Al Shaheed Park
Location: Kuwait City, Kuwait
Al Shaheed Park is the largest urban park in Kuwait. It is a fully integrated cultural platform with cutting-edge architecture and art works. The park's Amphitheater diversifies into different kinds of gardens (Oasis Garden, Museum Garden, Seasonal Garden and others), walkways, museums, exhibition areas, outdoor theatres, and performance centers for music concerts, theatrical performances, art exhibitions, and other kinds of cultural events. Al Shaheed Park consists of several phases. Phase II of the park opened in April 2017. The new phase includes a skate park, parkour area, tree top climbing obstacles, multipurpose youth complex, board and interactive games area, and an open air performance centre.

Al Shaheed Park landscapes also hold multiple historical zones such as the Memorial zone and the Museum zone.

Al Shaheed Park contains two museums. The Remembrance Museum shows the critical moments that shaped the Kuwait nation. The Habitat Museum displays the richness and diversity of the natural habitats of Kuwait through a large number of interactive programs and scenographic recreations.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Shaheed_Park
Name: Souq Al-Mubarakiya
Location: Kuwait City, Kuwait
Souq Al-Mubarakiya is a souq in Kuwait City, Kuwait. It is one of the oldest souqs in Kuwait, and was the center of trade prior to the discovery of oil. This popular traditional market is located in Kuwait City, between Abdullah Al-Mubarak, Abdullah Al-Salem & Palestine Streets. This market has been around for at least 200 years. The market was damaged during the Iraqi invasion in 1990, however it was renovated and it got back its traditional flavor.

You can spend hours in this market strolling around and discovering reasonable bargains on heritage goods such as Persian silk carpets, real Arab antiques, perfumes like musk and oud, and traditional costumes. This place is perfect whether you want to shop, eat, or for sightseeing. Al-Mubarakiya features a variety of shops such as dates, honey, spices, sweets, vegetables, fruits, meat, and fish. In addition to a range of shops accessories, gold and silver jewelries. The market also hosts two mini museums: Sheikh Mubarak Kiosk and the first Islamic pharmacy in Kuwait, and admission is free.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Souq_Al_Mubarakeya
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN KUWAIT / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO KUWAIT.
FACTS:
Official Languages: Arabic
Currency: Kuwait Dinar (KWD)
Time zone: AST (Arabia Standard Time) (UTC+3)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +965
Local / up-to-date weather in Kuwait City (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Kuwait travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Kuwait, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO KUWAIT.

The national currency is the Kuwaiti dinar, denoted by the symbol ” د.ك” or “KD” (ISO code: KWD).

The dinar is divided into 1000 fils. Notes are available in denominations of KD 20, 10, 5, 1, ½ and ¼, while 100, 50, 20, 10 and 5 fils coins are also available. Notes are Arabic in the front and English in the back, with Arabic numerals (the numerals used in English) on both sides.

The Kuwaiti dinar is the world’s highest-valued unit of currency. It is pegged to an undisclosed basket of currencies and the exchange rate hovers around KD 1 for US$3.30, so a burger that costs 3 dinars will set you back US$10.

Notes issued before 1994, many of which were stolen during the Iraqi occupation, are not considered legal tender. You’re unlikely to see these in Kuwait (the designs are clearly different), but unscrupulous dealers elsewhere have been known to try to pass them off. See the Central Bank of Kuwait for pictures.

Exchanging money can be difficult and exchanging travelers cheques even more so. Stick to ATMs, which are ubiquitous and work fine. Higher-end establishments accept credit cards.

Kuwait has a good road system. All signs are in English and Arabic. The major north-south roads are effectively freeways numbered Expressway 30, 40, etc. These are traversed by increasingly widely spaced ring roads named First, Second, etc., making navigation fairly easy.

Using Google Maps for navigation is a good option, as it offers traffic and roads, and all major destinations. However, if you need to find a location using its address (which you probably won’t need to). Google Maps will even give you wrong address for your current location and places. This is due to how Kuwait addresses work mixed with lack of proper support of Kuwait subdivisions in Google Maps platform. Areas are labelled as neighbourhoods and blocks as sub-neighbourhoods. For example, if you are in Street 1, block 1, Jabriya, your address will appear as Street 1, Kuwait City (since it is the only city in Kuwait, and neighbourhoods aren’t supposed to be included in addresses). So if you intend to go/find a place using its address, make sure you install the free and easy-to-use official Kuwait Finder GIS system on your phone from its apps market.

BY PUBLIC TRANSPORT:

Kuwait’s public transport is adequate with three companies (KPTC, City Bus and KGL) running dozens of routes in every major city. Waiting times for buses range from one minute for most frequent routes to 1 hour minutes for less used routes. All buses are equipped with air-conditioners and usually one can find a seat without much trouble. Although, during peak hours (7-9AM, 2-4PM, 8-9PM) most routes are packed and public transport should be avoided for those seeking comfortable travelling. Although areas with expatriates majority are covered with many routes, Kuwaiti residence areas are scarcely connected with public transport buses and are reachable mostly by taxis only.

Bus nr 500 runs to Abdaly – a village in the north on the border with Iraq. It departs every 3 hours (6AM, 9AM, etc.) from KPTC bust station in Hassawi.

BY TAXI:

These are recognisable by orange licence plates and may be hired by the day, in which case fares should be agreed beforehand. Although most taxis have meters these are rarely used as in practice, meters are always “broken”, covered, missing or just ignored, and you’ll need to agree on fares in advance. Beware that cabbies will often ask for ridiculous prices. Share-taxis are also available. Hailing taxis from the road is the most practical approach. However some sources have reported it was not advisable, particularly for females, and they recommend that taxis are booked in advance by telephone from a reputable taxi company. The cream-colored taxis are the cheapest, but also likely to be poorly maintained and possibly dangerously so, considering the general speed and size of the rest of the vehicles on Kuwaiti roads.

A standard rate is applicable in most taxis, but those at hotel ranks are more expensive. Naive westerners routinely pay 2 to 5 times more than the standard rates which are typically KD 0.500 for up to a 5 minute ride plus about KD 0.100 per minute thereafter. The only exception being airport departures which are approximately KD 3. Tipping is not expected, however you should negotiate fares before boarding the taxi. It is customary to collect all baggage and exit the taxi before offering payment to avoid conflicts or loss of personal property should a taxi driver demand more than the agreed price after arriving at the destination. This way, the passenger can drop the money in the seat and walk away if necessary.

It is common to share a taxi (which is often an unofficial taxi or a private car) from bus stations to more remote destinations such as Abdaly on Iraq border. Taxi drivers often wait until the car fills up with passengers and this may take an hour. Expect to pay KD 2-3 for the shared taxi with 3-4 other passengers. Do not agree to pay more. If the driver refuses, just wait a couple of minutes for another driver.

BY HIRE CAR:

Self-drive is available. If you produce an International Driving Permit, the rental company will, at the customer’s expense, be able to arrange the statutory temporary insurance, which is drawn on the driver’s visa. If you arrive at Kuwait International Airport, you will find the car hiring companies located at your left after you exit from the baggage claiming area. You can find international companies such as Avis and Budget among others.

However, driving in Kuwait, especially for those new to driving in the country, can be extremely chaotic and frightening. Turn signals and lane divisions are effectively optional, speeding and aggressive driving is commonplace, and there is little active enforcement of traffic laws. This is especially true for Kuwait city. Driving outside the city, you may have three lanes almost to yourself as there is little traffic.

A law has been passed to disallow the use of cell phones while driving (including voice calls and text messaging or SMS.) If driving, ensure you keep out of the left hand “fast” lane unless you are very relaxed about large 4-wheel drive vehicles tailgating you.

If involved in a car accident, do not attempt to move your car until police arrive and have made a report or you will be arrested.

Hiring a car may be a good (the only?) opportunity to experience the desert, the coast and the oilfields.

Prices are comparable to hiring a car in European countries, e.g. KD 10 for a small two door japanese made car, 4WD and american made sports cars may cost around KD 25. Petrol costs KD 0.1 per litre, gas stations are plenty.

EAT:

There is a huge array of restaurants in Kuwait. Because nightlife is virtually non-existent, most people go out to restaurants and malls. A wide variety of international cuisines is available in high-end restaurants, although some heavily pork-based cuisines (German, e.g.) are conspicuously absent. Kuwait is known for its culinary specialties and catering services. Restaurants can be found in food courts in malls, and alternatively many international restaurants are grouped together in certain areas in Kuwait, namely:

  • Behind the Roman Catholic Church in Kuwait City
  • Outside the Mövenpick Resort in Salmiya
  • In the Marina Crescent

Just ask any local where the “Restaurants Road” is and they will guide you to a road in Salmiya packed end-to-end with local restaurants serving a wide array of specialty sandwiches, juices and snacks. Alternatively, head to any of the major shopping malls which are also crowded with restaurants ranging from fast to gourmet food. Every conceivable U.S. chain is represented in Kuwait!

While rare, there are still some restaurants that serve traditional Kuwaiti food. Al-Marsa restaurant in Le Meridien Hotel (Bneid Al Gar location) has some traditional Kuwaiti seafood but with a relatively high price tag. A cheaper option is the quaint Shati Alwatia restaurant at the Behbehani Villa compound in the Qibla area of Kuwait City (behind the Mosques) and another Kuwaiti restaurant is Ferij Suwailih in salmiya area.

If you don’t feel like going out to eat, just about every restaurant and eatery in the country delivers food anywhere. Order online from a number of sites and enjoy the same selections as at the restaurant for a tiny delivery fee (usually 200 to 400 fils) tacked onto the order total itself.

For general grocery shopping, each district has its own ‘Co-operative Society’ (Jumayya) which anyone can use, and they usually consist of a supermarket and a general do-it-yourself store. When paying for your grocery shopping the cashier will usually ask if you have a number (which is given to local customers as a way to build up credits). It is also normal that somebody will pack your grocery bags for you and will carry the bags to your car, unless you insist otherwise. It is customary to tip them about KD 0.500 if they do go to your car, although they do not normally wait around for it. Kuwait also offers a wide variety of other supermarkets ranging from local chains of excellent quality (The Sultan Company) to hypermarkets operated by international heavy hitters such as Carrefour, Geant and an Indian chain, LuLu. All of them offer selections of truly international range and usually at competitive prices.

DRINK:

Alcohol is illegal in Kuwait: it may not be imported, manufactured or served, and newspapers regularly report busts of illegal distilleries.

Hotels in Kuwait are expensive, but major Western chains are well represented (see Kuwait City for hotel listings). Light sleepers should bring ear plugs as public announced prayers are broadcast before twilight and several times during the day.

Chalets and other weekend accommodation can be rented in many places along the southern part of the coast.

Kuwait is a tax-free country. Custom-made items, imported items, and shipping out of the country can be expensive, so shop wisely. Businesses are required by law to allow exchanges on credit cards purchases, and returns or exchanges on non-credit cards purchases for a period of a fortnight. If in a rare case you think a store isn’t obeying the laws, don’t hesitate to call Consumer Protection Department at 135.

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Kuwait
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Kuwait Towers
Location: Kuwait City, Kuwait
The Kuwait Towers are a group of three slender towers in Kuwait City, standing on a promontory into the Persian Gulf. They were the sixth, and last, group in the larger Kuwait Water Towers system of 34 towers (33 store water; one stores equipment), and were built in a style considerably different from the other five groups. The Kuwait Towers were officially inaugurated in March 1979 and are regarded as a landmark and symbol of modern Kuwait. The towers were closed for maintenance from March 2012 to 8 March 2016, with a massive fireworks festival commemorating the re-opening.

The main tower is 187 metres high and carries two spheres. The lower sphere holds in its bottom half a water tank of 4,500 cubic metres (1,200,000 US gal) and in its upper half there is a restaurant that accommodates 90 people, a café, a lounge and a reception hall. The upper sphere, which rises to 123 metres above sea level and completes a full turn every 30 minutes, holds a café. The second tower is 147 metres high and serves as a water tower. The third tower does not store water, housing equipment to illuminate the two larger towers.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kuwait_Towers
Name: Al Shaheed Park
Location: Kuwait City, Kuwait
Al Shaheed Park is the largest urban park in Kuwait. It is a fully integrated cultural platform with cutting-edge architecture and art works. The park's Amphitheater diversifies into different kinds of gardens (Oasis Garden, Museum Garden, Seasonal Garden and others), walkways, museums, exhibition areas, outdoor theatres, and performance centers for music concerts, theatrical performances, art exhibitions, and other kinds of cultural events. Al Shaheed Park consists of several phases. Phase II of the park opened in April 2017. The new phase includes a skate park, parkour area, tree top climbing obstacles, multipurpose youth complex, board and interactive games area, and an open air performance centre.

Al Shaheed Park landscapes also hold multiple historical zones such as the Memorial zone and the Museum zone.

Al Shaheed Park contains two museums. The Remembrance Museum shows the critical moments that shaped the Kuwait nation. The Habitat Museum displays the richness and diversity of the natural habitats of Kuwait through a large number of interactive programs and scenographic recreations.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Shaheed_Park
Name: Souq Al-Mubarakiya
Location: Kuwait City, Kuwait
Souq Al-Mubarakiya is a souq in Kuwait City, Kuwait. It is one of the oldest souqs in Kuwait, and was the center of trade prior to the discovery of oil. This popular traditional market is located in Kuwait City, between Abdullah Al-Mubarak, Abdullah Al-Salem & Palestine Streets. This market has been around for at least 200 years. The market was damaged during the Iraqi invasion in 1990, however it was renovated and it got back its traditional flavor.

You can spend hours in this market strolling around and discovering reasonable bargains on heritage goods such as Persian silk carpets, real Arab antiques, perfumes like musk and oud, and traditional costumes. This place is perfect whether you want to shop, eat, or for sightseeing. Al-Mubarakiya features a variety of shops such as dates, honey, spices, sweets, vegetables, fruits, meat, and fish. In addition to a range of shops accessories, gold and silver jewelries. The market also hosts two mini museums: Sheikh Mubarak Kiosk and the first Islamic pharmacy in Kuwait, and admission is free.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Souq_Al_Mubarakeya
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN KUWAIT / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

Global Immigration Leader, Big 4

“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

Internal stakeholder, Big 4

“Manny is a big reason why the move from (external provider) to the UK firm’s passport and visa provision has been so smooth. He’s an extremely likeable honest hard working guy who takes his role very seriously. We’re very fortunate to have him leading our dedicated team”

External client, Private practice

“Most of my contact was with Manpreet Singh Johal. He did the best job someone could imagine. Extraordinary service from his side.”

Team member, Big 4

“Working on two priority accounts is naturally pressurised especially where he has also been responsible for billing on both accounts; yet Manny delivers every time and this I believe is an exceptional quality.”

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