MEXICO

MEXICO

MEXICO

SELECT YOUR NATIONALITY

– No current scheduled consular closures.
CONSULAR CLOSURES
THE EMBASSY OF AFGHANISTAN IN LONDON IS CLOSED:
No current scheduled consular closures
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Chichen Itza
Location: Yucatán State, Mexico
Chichen Itza was a large pre-Columbian city built by the Maya people of the Terminal Classic period. The archaeological site is located in Tinúm Municipality, Yucatán State, Mexico. It is one of the most visited archaeological sites in Mexico.

Chichen Itza was a major focal point in the Northern Maya Lowlands from the Late Classic (c. AD 600–900) through the Terminal Classic (c. AD 800–900) and into the early portion of the Postclassic period (c. AD 900–1200). The site exhibits a multitude of architectural styles, reminiscent of styles seen in central Mexico and of the Puuc and Chenes styles of the Northern Maya lowlands. The presence of central Mexican styles was once thought to have been representative of direct migration or even conquest from central Mexico, but most contemporary interpretations view the presence of these non-Maya styles more as the result of cultural diffusion.

Chichen Itza was one of the largest Maya cities and it was likely to have been one of the mythical great cities. The city may have had the most diverse population in the Maya world, a factor that could have contributed to the variety of architectural styles at the site.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chichen_Itza
Name: Historic center of Mexico City
Location: Mexico City, Mexico
The historic center of Mexico City is the central neighborhood in Mexico City, Mexico, focused on the main plaza and extending in all directions for a number of blocks. It is the largest plaza in Latin America and can hold up to nearly 100,000 people.

This section of the capital lies in the municipal borough of Cuauhtémoc, has just over nine square km and occupies 668 blocks. It contains 9,000 buildings, 1,550 of which have been declared of historical importance. Most of these historic buildings were constructed between the 16th and 20th centuries. It is divided into two zones for preservation purposes. Zone A encompasses the pre-Hispanic city. Zone B covers the areas all other constructions to the end of the 19th century that are considered indispensable.

This is where the Spaniards began to build what is now modern Mexico City in the 16th century on the ruins of the conquered Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec Empire. As the centre of the ancient Aztec Empire and the seat of power for the Spanish colony of New Spain, the Centro Historico contains most of the city's historic sites from both eras as well as a large number of museums. This has made it a World Heritage Site.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexico_City
Name: Cancún
Location: Quintana Roo, Mexico
Cancún is a city in southeast Mexico on the northeast coast of the Yucatán Peninsula in the Mexican state of Quintana Roo. It is a significant tourist destination in Mexico and the seat of the municipality of Benito Juárez. The city is on the Caribbean Sea and is one of Mexico's easternmost points.

Cancún is just north of Mexico's Caribbean coast resort band known as the Riviera Maya. In older English-language documents, the city’s name is sometimes spelled "Cancoon," an attempt to convey the sound of the name.

There are some small Mayan vestiges of the pre-Columbian Maya civilization in Cancún. El Rey (Las Ruinas del Rey) is located in the Hotel Zone. El Meco, a more substantial site, is found on the mainland just outside the city limits on the road north to Punta Sam. Close by in the Riviera Maya and the Grand Costa Maya, there are sites such as Cobá and Muyil (Riviera) the small Polé (now Xcaret), and Kohunlich, Kinichná, Dzibanché, Oxtankah, Tulum, and Chacchoben, in the south of the state. Chichén Itzá is in the neighboring state of Yucatán.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cancún
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN MEXICO / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO MEXICO.
FACTS:
Official Languages: Spanish
Currency: Mexico Peso (MXN)
Time zones: Various. For a specific city / region – please see the following timeanddate.com Mexico weblink here
Drives on the right
Calling code: +52
Local / up-to-date weather in Mexico City (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Mexico travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Mexico, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO MEXICO.

The currency of Mexico is the peso, denoted in Mexico as “$” (ISO code MXN) and in Wikivoyage as “M$”. It is divided into 100 centavos. Prices in US dollars (in tourist areas) are labeled “US$” or sport an S with a double stroke.

Coins are issued in 5, 10 (steel), 20, 50 centavo (brass; new 50-centavo coins issued from 2011 on are steel and smaller in size) and 1, 2, 5 (steel ring, brass center), 10, 20, 50, and 100 peso (brass ring, steel or silver center) denominations, but it’s extremely rare to find coins valued at more than 10 pesos.

Banknotes are produced in 20 pesos (blue), 50 (pink-red), 100 (red), 200 (green), 500 (brown), and 1,000 (purple and pink for the latest issue, purple for older issues) denominations. The current issue of 20, 50 and 100 peso bills are made from polymer plastic, and there are several different series of all banknotes. Ten-peso notes exist, but are very rare and no longer issued and accepted.

“Old” pesos (issued before 1993) are no longer accepted, but are usually collected by numismatists.

Merchants may accept US dollars at a lower exchange rate. US dollars are widely accepted in the far north and in tourist locales elsewhere.

Other currencies such as the euro, pound sterling, and Swiss franc are generally not accepted by merchants, and even banks headquartered in Europe may refuse to accept euros for exchange. On the other hand, most banks and exchange offices (casas de cambio) will widely accept them.

If you arrive from the south and still carry Central American currency around try to exchange them as soon as possible, as outside of the immediate border area not even banks will accept them. As all Central American countries either have the US dollar as their national currency (El Salvador, Panama) or have it circulating to varying degrees as a de facto second currency and virtually all banks in Central America and most banks in Mexico accept US dollars (usually at better rates than any other currency) your best bet is to “triangulate” your money from local currency to dollars and from dollars to pesos rather than exchanging them directly, which can be difficult and expensive. Should you have forgotten to exchange your money and the banks are closed, street money changers (called coyotes or cambistas) don’t have fixed opening hours and often have better rates. Be careful however, as they do from time to time rip off foreigners with bogus calculators, wrong rates and counterfeit or outdated (and thus worthless) bills.

BY CAR:

Due to a government scheme in the early 1990s to create infrastructure, the best roads are toll roads. Toll roads can be relatively costly (M$400-800 is common on longer trips) but are much faster and better maintained. First-class buses generally travel by toll roads (and the toll is obviously included in the ticket price).

US vehicle insurance is not valid in Mexico, and while Mexican auto insurance is not required, it is highly recommended, as any minor accident could land you in jail without it. MexiPass and AAA offer Mexican auto insurance.

When traveling on Mexican roads, especially near the borders with the United States and Guatemala, one will probably encounter several checkpoints operated by the Mexican Army searching for illegal weapons and drugs. If you are coming from the United States, you may not be used to this, and it can be intimidating. However, these are rarely a problem for honest people. Simply do what the soldiers tell you to do, and treat them with respect. The best way to show respect when entering a checkpoint is to turn your music down, lift sunglasses from your face, and be prepared to roll your window down. They should treat you with respect as well, and they usually do. If you are asked to unpack any part of your vehicle, do so without complaint. It is their right to make you completely unload in order for them to inspect your cargo.

Tourists are often warned about travelling on roads at night. Although bandidos are rare in more metropolitan areas, err on the side of caution in more rural areas. The best bet is to drive during only daylight hours. Cattle, dogs, and other animals also can appear on the roadway unexpectedly, so if you do have to drive at night, be very cautious. If possible, follow a bus or truck that seems to be driving safely.

Foreign drivers’ licenses are recognized and recommended. Speeding tickets are common, and to ensure your presence at the hearing, the officer may choose to keep your license. He is within his rights to do so. Beware though, police officers are known to keep driver’s licenses until they are given a bribe.

At petrol (gas) stations, make sure the pump is zeroed out before the attendant begins pumping your gas so that you don’t end up paying more than you should. There is only one brand of gas station (Pemex) and prices are generally the same regardless of location, so don’t bother shopping around.

Good maps are invaluable and the Mexico maps included in “North American Road Atlas” books are worse than useless. The Guia Roji maps are particularly good.

BY PLANE:

Mexico is a large country, and with the low-cost revolution that started in 2005 following the break up of the CINTRA monopoly, new (budget) airlines had came in and expanded, offering competitive fares that rival bus travel over long distances. With increased fuel costs, the bargain days may be gone, but the prices are still more reasonable than when CINTRA operated Mexicana and Aeromexico, as a monopoly, before 2005. Major airlines hubs for all or several of the airlines are in Mexico City, Toluca, Guadalajara, Cancun and Monterrey. There are additional point to point services from several other cities.

The main airlines providing service to over 60 cities within Mexico are:

  • Aeromexico/Aeromexico Connect, +52 55 5133-4000 (MX), toll-free: +1-800-237-6639 (US). Is the ‘national’ and ‘legacy’ carrier with hubs in Mexico City, Guadalajara and Monterrey. They’re also a member of the SkyTeam Alliance.
  • Aeromar, +52 55 51-33-11-11, toll-free: 01 800 237-6627 (MX).
  • Interjet, +52 55 1102-55-55, toll-free: 01800 01 12345 (MX). Hub in Mexico City & focus cities in Cancun, Guadalajara and Monterrey. Internationally they go out to Canada, Costa Rica, Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, and the USA. Since 2015 they had tried to take over the spot in the One World Alliance left behind by Mexicana but were unsuccessful. They do have alliances with American Airlines, LATAM and Iberia all One World Alliance members.
  • Magnicharters, +52 55 5678-1000, +52 55 5678-3600 (DF), +52 81 2282-9620, +52 2282-9621 (MTY). Hubs are in Monterrey & Mexico City. Used to operate only between Monterrey, Mexico City, Guadalajara & Cancun. They had since expanded to include additional Mexican and U.S. cities.
  • VivaAerobus. Low-cost, Ryanair-like airline with hubs in Cancun, Monterrey, Mexico City & Guadalajara and new focus cities in Merida and Puebla. They expanded service to the USA after 2011.
  • Volaris, +52 55 1102-8000, toll-free: +1 855 865-2747 (US). Hubs are in Mexico City, Tijuana and Guadalajara with focus cities in Cancun, Monterrey and Leon. They also have an additional hub in San Jose Costa Rica and a focus city in Los Angeles, outside of Mexico. Since the demise of Mexicana in 2010 they had expanded & taken over many of Mexicana’s routes and airport slots within Mexico & the U.S. They had since expanded services to more cities in the U.S., Costa Rica, El Salvador and Nicaragua.

There are also small airlines operating within certain areas such as:

  • Calafia Airlines, +1 619 489-1439 (US), toll-free: 01 800 5603949 (MX). Operates scheduled flights between multiple cities in the Baja California Peninsula and from the Baja California Peninsula to Chihuahua, Jalisco, Sonora & Sinaloa states. They also connect the Baja California Peninsula to Leon (Guanajuato), Monterey (Nuevo Leon), Mexico City and San Luis Potosi, all in the smaller Embraer ERJ & Cessna aircraft. They also connect Palenque and Tuxtla Gutierrez (Chiapas) to Mexico City and Cancun. They also offer charters & air taxi services too.
  • Aerotucán, +52 952 502-0840, toll-free: 01800 640-4148. Flies between Oaxaca City, Ciudad Ixtepec, Huatulco and Puerto Escondido in Oaxaca state with the Cessna Grand Caravan plane.
  • Mayair, +52 987 872-3609 (MX), +1 414 755-2527 (US & CA), toll-free: 01800 962-9247. Operates regional flights from Cancun to Cozumel, Chetumal and Merida and from Villahermosa to Veracruz and Merida in the smaller Dornier 228 and the Fokker 50 aircraft.
  • TAR, +52 55 2629-5272. Hub in Queretaro with focus cities in Guadalajara, Monterrey, and Puerto Vallarta to multiple destinations with Embraer ERJ145 jets nationwide and expanding.

BY BUS:

If traveling by bus, be sure to take the express (first class) buses (directo, sin escalas, primera clase), if available. First class (directo, sin escalas, primera clase) buses are usually direct routes and are the best option for most. These buses are comfortable, have washrooms/toilets and will generally show movies, which may or may not be in English with Spanish subtitles (or vice versa). Others may even offer a drink and a little snack. First class buses travel over longer distances between cities use toll freeways where available. They may make scheduled stops (semi-directo) at specific bus stations en route otherwise they make no stops en-route (sin escalas). Other buses such as the second class (economico, ordinario, local) buses may be very similar to first class only they travel along secondary highways through cities, towns and villages and stop anywhere along the road on request. Second class bus routes are typically shorter and will take considerably longer to travel over longer distances (such as from Cancun to Mexico City) with multiple stops and multiple transfers, it is not worth the few pesos saved over first class buses. They are fine for more local travel, such as between Cancun and Playa del Carmen or to somewhere along the highway in between. In other places they may be more frequent and more available than first class such as going to Zempoala (town) from Veracruz (city). Some of the second class buses may even be chicken buses (polleros) in rural, off the beaten track, places. Executive (Ejecutivo) and Luxury (Lujo) lines cost about 60% more than first class, are faster, usually have larger seats, and they have less frequent departures; they rival flying business class on a plane and are a good option for elderly or business travelers or overnight travel in lieu of a night’s stay at a hotel (or hostel).

When acquiring tickets for the bus, the local custom is that the passenger comes to the terminal and buys the ticket for next available bus going to the desired destination with first and deluxe class buses unless it is during busy travel times such as Easter and Christmas. During busy travel times tickets can be booked one or two days in advance online or at the station. With second class buses, tickets can be purchased at the station within 2 hours of a departure, no advance reservations prior, at the beginning of a route or the fare paid to the driver if picked up from along side of the road. With the advent of NAFTA, some bus companies are now offering service from cities in several US states. The major bus companies offering these kind of services are:

  • (Autobuses de Baja California). Bus services up and down Hwy 1 in the Baja California Peninsula in both Baja California Norte y Sur states and along Hwy 2/2D to western Sonora
  • ADO (Autobuses Del Oriente), +52 55 5133-5133, toll-free: 01 800-009-9090. They operate the ADO, ADO GL, AU (Autobus Unidos), OCC (Omnibus Cristobal Colon), Platino, Texcoco, Diamante, Estrella de Oro, Cuenca and Pluss bus lines and the ClickBus booking site (formerly Boletotal & Ticketbus). They are a major bus company in the eastern and southeastern part of the country towards the Guatemalan border in the states of Guerrero, Puebla, Veracruz, Chiapas, Tamaulipas, Tabasco, and the Yucatan Peninsula (Yucatan, Quintana Roo and Campeche). Travel towards Guatemala via Tapachula or Tuxtla Guttierrez; to Belize through Chetumal and the United States border through Matamoros. They only offer cross border buses to Belize City from Cancun and Merida via Chetumal.
  • Autobuses Coordinados de Nayrit (ACN), toll-free: 01800 026-73-73. They serve mainly in the western and northwestern states of Baja California Norte, Jalisco, Michocoan, Nayrit, Sinaloa and Sonora in Mexico and California (historically ‘Alta California’) in the U.S.
  • Autovias, toll-free: 01 800-622-22-22. serving Colima, Guerrero, Guanajuato, Jalisco, Michoacan, Mexico DF, Estado Mexico and Queretaro. Other subsidiary brands include Allegra, La Linea and the Pegasso brands.
  • Costa Line AERS, +52 55 5336-5560, toll-free: 01 800-0037-635. Serves mainly in Mexico state, Morelos and Guerrero from Mexico City. They also operate the Turistar, Futura and AMS bus lines.
  • ETN (Enlances Terrestre Nacionales), Turistar Lujo. They offer a ‘deluxe’ or ‘executive’ class seating with 2 seats on one side of the aisle and one on the opposite side with more leg room and an ability to recline into a lying position. They go to Aguascaliente, Baja California Norte, Coahuila, Chihuahua, Durango, Guanajuato, Guerrero, Hidalgo, Jalisco, Mexico, Mexico City DF, Michocoan, Morelos, Nayrit, Nuevo Leon, Oaxaca (coast), Queretaro, San Luis Potosi, Sinaloa, Sonora, Veracruz (Poza Rica, Tuxpan) and Zacatecas states
  • Grupo Estrella Blanca (White Star), +52 55 5729-0807, toll-free: 01 800-507-5500. They operate the Anahuac, Elite, TNS (Transportes Norte de Sonora), Chihuahuanese, Pacifico, TF (Tranporte Frontera), Estrella Blanca, Conexion, Rapidos de Cuauhtemoc, Valle de Guadiana and Autobus Americanos bus lines. As the largest bus company they serve much of the northern & northwestern part of the country such as Aguascaliente, Baja California Norte, Coahuila, Chihuahua, Durango, Districto Federal (DF), Guanajuato, Guerrero, Hidalgo, Jalisco, Estado de Mexico, Michoacán, Morelos, Nayarit, Queretaro, San Luis Potosi, Sinaloa, Sonora and Zacatecas states, up to the US border. They sell tickets for onward travel to the United States from the border on Greyhound Lines (and vice versa).
  • Estrella de Oro (Gold Star), +52 55 5133-5133, toll-free: 01 800-009-9090. operates mainly between Mexico City and various places in Districto Federal (DF), Guerrero, Veracruz and Hidalgo states. They are now a subsidiary of Grupo ADO but continue to operate as a separate company and brand.
  • Estrella Roja (Red Star), +52 222 273-8300, toll-free: 01 800-712-2284. Travels mainly between Mexico City and Puebla.
  • Primera Plus (Grupo Flecha Amarilla), +52 477 710-0060, toll-free: 0800 375-75-87. Subsidiary of Grupo Flecha Amarilla which also include ETN, Turistar Lujo, Servicios Coordinados, TTUR and Flecha Amarilla (second class service) bus lines. They serve Jalisco, Michoacán, Guanajuato, Colima, Aguascalientes, Querétaro, San Luis Potosí, México,D.F., Nayarit, Estado de Mexico, Hidalgo, Guerrero and Sinaloa states
  • Grupo Flecha Roja, Aguila, +52 55 5516 5153, toll-free: 01 800 224-8452. Operates mainly between Mexico City and various places in northern part of Mexico state into Queretaro state on the Flecha Roja brand and to the southeastern part of Mexico State into Guerrero and Morelos states as Aguila.
  • FYPSA, +52 951 516-2270. operates mainly between Districto Federal (DF), Mexico state, Oaxaca and Chiapas states.
  • Omnibus de Mexico, +52 55 5141-4300, toll-free: 01 800-765-66-36. They serve much of the central and northern part of the country such as Aguascaliente, Colima, Coahuila, Chihuahua, Durango, Guanajuato, Guerrero, Jalisco, Michocoan, Nayrit, Queretaro, San Luis Potosi, Sinaloa, Sonora, Tamaulipas, Veracruz and Zacatecas states, up to the US border.
  • Pullman de Morelos, +52 55 5545-3505, toll-free: 0800 624-03-60. Operates buses in/around Guerrero and Morelos. They operate the Ejecutivo Dorado (Golden Executive), Pullman de Lujo, Primera Clase, Primera Federal and Primera Local (2nd class).
  • Grupo Senda. They serve much of the north central part of the country such as Aguascaliente, Colima, Coahuila, Chihuahua, Durango, Guerrero, Jalisco, Michoacan, Nuevo Leon, Queretaro, San Luis Potosi, Sinaloa, Tamaulipas and Zacatecas states, up to the US border as. From the border they continue up to the southeastern and central U.S. states of Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee from Texas as Turimex Internacional. They also operate the and Del Norte and Coahuilenses bus lines in north central part of Mexico, south of Texas.
  • TAP, toll-free: 0800-0011-827. Operates bus more or less along the Hwy 15 corridor between Tijuana and Guadalajara and other places off of the Hwy 15 corridor in Baja California Norte, Guerrero, Jalisco, Michoacan, Nayarit, Sinaloa, Sonora, Estado de Mexico and Mexico DF. They also operate the TAP Royal bus lines from the border to Los Angeles, Phoenix, Las Vegas and Tuscon in the southwestern part of the U.S.
  • Zina Bus, Excelencia, Excelencia Plus, +52 55 5278-4721. Goes from Mexico DF to the surrounding Mexico, Guerreo and Michoacan states. The company also operate Autobus Pegasso to Guanajuato and Querétaro as well as Estado de Mexico and Michoacán.

The above are major bus lines traversing much of the country with some crossing the border into the U.S. No bus company holds a large market share nationwide like Greyhound in the U.S. but some do have a greater market share in certain regions. There are over 200 other companies and drivers’ unions operating buses not listed in the above which you will find once there or see (or add to) the specific articles of a region, city or town.

On the other hand if traveling within a city, you won’t find a pleasant surprise. You will find one of the most chaotic public transport systems full of the popular “peseros”. “Peseros” are small buses with varying color codes depending on the city you are in. Usually the route taken is written on cardboard attached to the windshield or with wet and than dried soap or chalk on the windshield listing the local colonias (neighborhoods) and points of interest (Wal Mart, Costco, malls, hospitals, universities, etc.) the route serves and are not numbered. Unlike in many countries, bus stops are uncommon and you are expect to signal the bus to pick you up and drop you off wherever you want. You will rarely find a stop button in a pesero; just shout the word “baja!” for it to stop. Fares are cheap and vary from M$5-8 approximately.

BY TRAIN:

The only available passenger train is the Chihuahua al Pacific Railway (CHEPE) operated by Ferromex between Los Mochis and the city of Chihuahua, through the Copper Canyon. In the state of Jalisco there are a couple of lines which travel from the state capital city of Guadalajara to the nearby tequila distilleries in the small town of Amatitlan on the Tequila Express and to the Jose Cuervo distilleries in the town of Tequila on the Jose Cuervo Express. The latter two from Guadalajara are tourist trains offering tours of the tequila distilleries, and not a form of transportation to get to those towns.

It may be possible to hop aboard or on top of freight cars in some parts of the country (if you happen to be an adventurer) as many migrants traveling from Central America to the USA are doing this. The prospect of hopping the freight is dangerous due to the lack of restraints which results in falling off, getting run over by the wheels, getting hit by an oncoming train (if fallen into the wrong spot), or being robbed by bandits along the way.

That being said, there have been talks of expanding suburban rail services in several cities and high-speed passenger services, but no plans have materialized as of May 2017. Mexico City, Guadalajara and Monterrey have subway and/or light rail services.

EAT:

Mexican cuisine can be described better as a collection of various regional cuisines rather than a standard list of dishes for the whole country. Because of climate, geography and ethnic differences, we can classify Mexican cuisine broadly in 4 great categories according to the region:

  • Northern – Mostly meat dishes done mainly from beef and goat. This includes Cabrito, Carne Asada (Barbecue) and Arrachera. Is influenced by international cuisine (mostly from the United States and Europe), but it retains the essential Mexican flavor.
  • Central – This region is influenced by the rest of the country, but has its own well-developed local flavor in dishes such as Pozole, Menudo and Carnitas. Dishes are mostly corn-based and with different spices.
  • Southeastern – Is known for its spicy vegetable and chicken-based dishes. Caribbean cuisine have influences here because of the location.
  • Coast – Has a strong emphasis on seafood and fish, but corn-based recipes can be easily found as well.

Ask for the “platillo tipico” of the town, which is the local speciality that may not be found elsewhere, a variation, or the birthplace of a recipe, also consider that most of the recipes change from place to place, like tamales, in the south are made with the banana plant leaves, and in the Huasteca region tamales are very big (There are called “Zacahuil”), one is OK for a complete family.

If you are travelling here from Spain or elsewhere in Latin America, keep in mind that many Mexican dishes can have the same name, but be very different from their counterparts elsewhere. For instance, a Mexican tamal is very different from a Colombian tamal, and a Mexican tortilla bears virtually no similarity at all to a Spanish tortilla.

Traditional Mexican food can often be very spicy; if you are not used to peppers, always ask if your food includes it. “(¿Esto tiene chile? Es picante?).”

There are many food carts on the streets of Mexican cities and towns. Travelers are advised to eat from these carts with caution, as hygienic preparation practices are not always reliable. In doing so, you may (or may not) find some of the most unique and genuinely Mexican dishes you’ve ever had. From these vendors, you may find tacos, burgers, bread, roasted field corn or elote served with mayonnaise, or a light cream, and sprinkled with fresh white cheese, roasted sweet potato called camote, and almost any kind of food and service you would imagine.

  • Chicharrón – Deep fried pork skin. Quite crunchy and if well-prepared slightly oily. Heavenly spread with guacamole. Or sometimes cooked in a mild chili sauce and served with eggs.
  • Enchiladas – Chicken or meat stuffed soft tortillas covered with green, red or mole sauce. Some may have melted cheese inside and/or on top.
  • Tacos – Soft corn tortillas filled with meat (asada (steak strips), pollo (shredded chicken), carnitas (fried shredded pork), lengua (cow tongue), cabeza (meat from cow skull), sesos (cow brains), tripa (cow gut), al pastor (chili, pork, beef cut from a spit) or chorizo (pork sausage)). In the north sometimes flour tortillas are used. Do not expect the crispy taco shell anywhere.
  • Tamales (singular tamal) – corn dough shell with meat or vegetable fillings. Tamales Dulces contain fruit and/or nuts.
  • Tortas – Fancy Mexican sandwich. Bread roll that is grilled lightly, meat fillings are same as tacos, lettuce, tomatoes, jalapeños, beans, onion, mayonnaise and avocado. One is beginning to find tortas with the American styled cold cuts available, as well, in urban areas.
  • Huitlacoche – (wit-la-ko-che) A fungus, much like mushrooms, found in corn. This dish is usually an additive to others. Foreigners might find it hard to stomach but Mexicans swear by it. Although most Mexicans love huitlacoche, most do not prepare it in their own home very frequently. It can be found in most markets or stores.
  • Quesadillas – Cheese or other ingredients grilled in between corn tortillas, heavy on cheese and lighter on other items such as chicken, pork, beans, squash flower blossoms and such.
  • Mole – Mild to medium chili based sauce made with cocoa and a hint of peanut over meat, usually served with shredded chicken or turkey. (‘Pollo en mole’ and this is known as Puebla or poblano style). There are many regional moles and some are green, yellow, black and can vary greatly in flavor depending on the artistic talent or preferences involved.
  • Pozole – Chicken or pork broth with hominy corn, spiced when served with oregano, lettuce, lemon juice, radish, chopped onion, dried ground chile and other ingredients such as chicken, pork, or even seafood, usually served with a side dish of tostadas, fried potato and fresh cheese tacos. Very fortifying.
  • Gorditas – corn patty stuffed with chicharron, chicken, cheese, etc. topped with cream, cheese and hot sauce.
  • Grillo – Grasshopper, usually cooked and placed inside another dish such as a quesadilla. It is frequently found in markets in the state of Morelos and other central Mexico states. This is not common in Mexico City.
  • Guacamole – crushed avocado sauce with green serrano chile, chopped red tomato and onion, lime juice, salt, and served with somewhat thick (1/8 inch) fried tortilla slices or “totopos”.
  • Tostadas – fried flat tortilla topped with fried beans, lettuce, cream, fresh cheese, sliced red tomato and onion, hot sauce, and chicken or other main ingredient. Think a corn chip dippers, on low dose steroids, for salsas and as above. You do not usually get a plate of this automatically in many parts of Mexico as you would in the US, although they are starting to show up in resort areas that cater to US nationals automatically.
  • Huaraches – a bigger (think shoe-shaped) version a gordita.
  • Sopes – corn patty topped with a wide variety of ingredients such as chicken, cheese, mashed beans, and various hot sauces.
  • Carnitas – deep fried pork meat served with a variety of salsa”, to get them dry with less grease.
  • Chile en nogada – A big green Poblano chile with a beef or pork apple stuffing, covered with a white nut (usually walnut, known as nuez) sauce and sprinkled with pomegranate seeds which happen to be red. The three colors represent the national flag and the dish is served nationwide around Mexican Independence Day 16 September.
  • Barbacoa – Sheep or goat meat cooked with maguey leaves in an oven made at a hole in the ground. Think BBQ heaven without the hickory smoke or catsup-based BBQ sauce. Served with condiments and salsas in corn tortilas and sometimes in a torta bread roll.
  • Sopa de Tortilla – tortilla chips soup usually of chicken broth, plain or with a touch of tomato flavor, and usually mild and not at all hot. Commonly served with diced avocado and fresh crumbled white cheese on top.
  • Chilaquiles – tortilla chips with a green tomatillo, or red tomato, or mild chili sauce, usually served with chicken or eggs on top or within. Usually a mild dish.
  • Migas – is a typical dish in the center of the country which is a guajillo chile broth with soaked bread, which you can add the pork bones with meat or eggs.

You can measure the quality of food by popularity; do not eat in lonely places, even if they are restaurants or hotels. Consider that Mexicans eat their main meal in the middle of the afternoon (around 3 o’clock), with breakfast or “almuerzo”, a mid-morning affair after a very light something, like a small plate of fruit or a roll with coffee, in the very early morning. Although, many Mexicans have large breakfasts in the morning. Later, at night the meal varies from very light, such as commonly sweet rolls or breads, coffee or hot chocolate, to heavy dinner, such as pozole, tacos, and tamales. Schedule your meals accordingly and you will get a better perspective on the gauge of how busy (popular) a restaurant is.

DRINK:

Tap water is potable, but generally not recommended for drinking. Some exaggerated people even claim that tap water is not good for brushing teeth. Hotels usually give guests one (large) bottle of drinking water per room per night. Bottled water is also readily available in supermarkets and at tourist attractions.

  • Absinthe is legal in Mexico.
  • Tequila, distilled from Agave (a specific type of cactus)
  • Pulque, ferment made from Maguey
  • Mezcal, similar to tequila but distilled from Maguey
  • Tepache, made from pineapple
  • Tuba, made from coconut palm tree

There are also several Mexican beers, most of which are available outside Mexico, these include Corona (popular, but not necessarily as overwhelmingly popular in Mexico as many foreigners think), Dos Equis (XX) and Modelo Especial.

Lighter Mexican beers are often served with lime and salt, though many Mexicans do not drink beer in this fashion. In some places you will find beer served as a prepared drink called “Michelada” or simply “Chelada”. The formula varies depending on the place, but it’s usually beer mixed with lime juice and various sauces and spices on ice served in a salt rim glass. Other variation called “Cubana” includes Clamato cocktail, soybean sauce, salt and a little bit of hot sauce.

Northwestern Mexico, including Baja California and Sonora, also produces wines, and Mexican wine is often quite good, but most Mexicans tend to prefer European or Chilean imports.

Non alcoholic beverages:

  • Chocolate
  • Atole
  • Horchata (rice based drink)
  • Agua de Jamaica (hibiscus iced tea, similar to karkadai in Egypt)
  • Licuados de fruta (Fruit smoothies and milkshakes)
  • Champurrado (Thick chocolate drink)
  • Refrescos (common sodas, generally sweet and made with cane sugar, not corn syrup as in the United States).

The legal drinking age in Mexico is 18, but not strictly enforced. In many places, consumption of alcohol in public (“open container”) is illegal and usually punishable by a day in jail. Be aware of waitresses and barmen, especially at night clubs. If you are not aware of your consumption and how much you already spent, they can add a few more drinks to your account. Some do this, not all.

Alcoholmeters are widely used in driving roads If drinking, always have a designated driver. Driving under the influence of an alcoholic beverage will result in 1 to 3 days in jail.

Mexico, especially the southern state of Chiapas, produces excellent coffee. Café con leche, usually one part coffee to one part steamed milk, is very popular. Unfortunately, many places in Mexico that are not cafés serve Nescafe or other instant coffee – you may have to search for the good coffee, but it’s there.

Several hotel chains are available throughout Mexico, including Palace Resorts, Le Blanc Spa Resort, Best Western, Holiday Inn, CityExpress, Fiesta Inn, Fairmont, Hilton, Ritz, Camino Real, Marriott (Sheraton, W, Westin, Four Points) and many others. Rates have risen considerably, though most are still reasonable compared to similar U.S. or European hotels. Chain accommodations are usually clean and comfortable, good for business travelers, but not necessarily for those wanting to experience Mexico itself. Smaller hotels and motels along the roadside may not be safe or comfortable. Boutique hotels are found all over the country; price range varies but all of them are rich in Mexican traditions, elegance and charm, the perfect way to experience the cultural heritage of each state. A great source of information is Melba Levick’s book Mexicasa, found in many libraries and online bookstores. There are also many all-inclusive resorts for those visiting the major beach destinations.

There is a large backpacker culture in Mexico, and there are many hostels offering dorm accommodation and private rooms. You can expect to pay M$50-150 for a night in a dorm, often including breakfast. Hostels are a fantastic place to share information with fellow travelers, and you can often find people who have been to your future destinations. There are a number of internet sites that allow you to book hostels in advance for a small fee, and this is becoming an increasingly common practice.

The most authentic accommodation can usually be found by asking locals or gringos, especially in the smaller towns. If you are unsure about the safety or conditions of the room ask to see it before paying. This will not be considered rude.

If you are going to be in cooler areas in the winter consider bringing an electric blanket, a sleeping bag or extra clothes, as there is power, but no heat in the cheaper hotels. And although it may get quite hot by afternoon outside, adobe and cement are like fridges. An electric tea kettle is also a good idea, as hot water might not be available when you want it.

If you’re travelling with children, use a plastic case (with wheels and a handle) as luggage, and it can be used as a bathtub for the kids if necessary. Budget hotels rarely, if ever, have bathtubs.

Merchants can be picky about the state of your paper money and may scrutinize it and reject anything with rips. Try to keep it in as pristine condition as possible. Reputedly, this is more the case the farther south you go. In any case, you can easily enter a bank with some damaged bill to get it exchanged into another one.

Merchants are often reluctant to make change in smaller towns. Try to avoid paying with overly large denominations; the best customer has exact change. In rural areas, your ‘change’ may consist of chiclets or other small commodities.

Merchants, specially those in small markets (“tianguis”) and street vendors are no strangers to haggling. Try asking “¿Es lo menos?” (“Is this the smallest price?”), The more rural and less touristic the area you’re likely to have more success.

  • Indigenous Art A visit to anywhere in Mexico will give one the opportunity to buy art made in the “old world” manner that reflects the diverse ethnicity of Mexico. Included in these articles would be textiles, wood carvings, paintings and carved masks that are used on sacred dances and burials.
  • Timeshares When visiting the resort cities of Mexico (e.g. Cancun, Puerto Vallarta or similar), it is more than common to be approached on the streets, in bars, in restaurants and anywhere with offers of gifts, free rental cars, free nights, free dinners, free anything that may appeal to you, just for visiting and listening to a presentation to buy a timeshare. Unless you are severely desperate for something to do, you may want to ignore those making the offer and stay away from those free offers. While the properties are very nice, great locations and plenty of amenities, this is not the place to learn about timeshares. Do your homework before even thinking about buying a timeshare, see what the values are in the resale market and understand the rights you are buying and the future costs. Collecting on the free offers may be difficult, if not impossible.
  • Automobiles It’s certainly worth going over and importing a car back from there, although importing it to the EU/US standards is the hard part. Recommended are the Ford Fusion (like the British Ford Mondeo, but more upmarket) and the Chrysler 200 (the 2.4 model is worth it). Volkswagens can be substantially better-equipped than European or North American counterparts. The Passat sold in Mexico is not the same car as in Europe, and is substantially bigger, however, engines are the same as in Europe, except for the 2.5 petrol.
  • Cuban cigars are a fun novelty for tourists from the US and are widely available. It’s still illegal to bring them back to the US, although the worst that’s likely to happen is they’ll be confiscated by customs.
**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Mexico
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Chichen Itza
Location: Yucatán State, Mexico
Chichen Itza was a large pre-Columbian city built by the Maya people of the Terminal Classic period. The archaeological site is located in Tinúm Municipality, Yucatán State, Mexico. It is one of the most visited archaeological sites in Mexico.

Chichen Itza was a major focal point in the Northern Maya Lowlands from the Late Classic (c. AD 600–900) through the Terminal Classic (c. AD 800–900) and into the early portion of the Postclassic period (c. AD 900–1200). The site exhibits a multitude of architectural styles, reminiscent of styles seen in central Mexico and of the Puuc and Chenes styles of the Northern Maya lowlands. The presence of central Mexican styles was once thought to have been representative of direct migration or even conquest from central Mexico, but most contemporary interpretations view the presence of these non-Maya styles more as the result of cultural diffusion.

Chichen Itza was one of the largest Maya cities and it was likely to have been one of the mythical great cities. The city may have had the most diverse population in the Maya world, a factor that could have contributed to the variety of architectural styles at the site.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chichen_Itza
Name: Historic center of Mexico City
Location: Mexico City, Mexico
The historic center of Mexico City is the central neighborhood in Mexico City, Mexico, focused on the main plaza and extending in all directions for a number of blocks. It is the largest plaza in Latin America and can hold up to nearly 100,000 people.

This section of the capital lies in the municipal borough of Cuauhtémoc, has just over nine square km and occupies 668 blocks. It contains 9,000 buildings, 1,550 of which have been declared of historical importance. Most of these historic buildings were constructed between the 16th and 20th centuries. It is divided into two zones for preservation purposes. Zone A encompasses the pre-Hispanic city. Zone B covers the areas all other constructions to the end of the 19th century that are considered indispensable.

This is where the Spaniards began to build what is now modern Mexico City in the 16th century on the ruins of the conquered Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec Empire. As the centre of the ancient Aztec Empire and the seat of power for the Spanish colony of New Spain, the Centro Historico contains most of the city's historic sites from both eras as well as a large number of museums. This has made it a World Heritage Site.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexico_City
Name: Cancún
Location: Quintana Roo, Mexico
Cancún is a city in southeast Mexico on the northeast coast of the Yucatán Peninsula in the Mexican state of Quintana Roo. It is a significant tourist destination in Mexico and the seat of the municipality of Benito Juárez. The city is on the Caribbean Sea and is one of Mexico's easternmost points.

Cancún is just north of Mexico's Caribbean coast resort band known as the Riviera Maya. In older English-language documents, the city’s name is sometimes spelled "Cancoon," an attempt to convey the sound of the name.

There are some small Mayan vestiges of the pre-Columbian Maya civilization in Cancún. El Rey (Las Ruinas del Rey) is located in the Hotel Zone. El Meco, a more substantial site, is found on the mainland just outside the city limits on the road north to Punta Sam. Close by in the Riviera Maya and the Grand Costa Maya, there are sites such as Cobá and Muyil (Riviera) the small Polé (now Xcaret), and Kohunlich, Kinichná, Dzibanché, Oxtankah, Tulum, and Chacchoben, in the south of the state. Chichén Itzá is in the neighboring state of Yucatán.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cancún
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN MEXICO / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

Global Immigration Leader, Big 4

“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

Internal stakeholder, Big 4

“Manny is a big reason why the move from (external provider) to the UK firm’s passport and visa provision has been so smooth. He’s an extremely likeable honest hard working guy who takes his role very seriously. We’re very fortunate to have him leading our dedicated team”

External client, Private practice

“Most of my contact was with Manpreet Singh Johal. He did the best job someone could imagine. Extraordinary service from his side.”

Team member, Big 4

“Working on two priority accounts is naturally pressurised especially where he has also been responsible for billing on both accounts; yet Manny delivers every time and this I believe is an exceptional quality.”

Please think before printing – click here for more info

WEB LINKS

LOCATIONS