MONTENEGRO

MONTENEGRO

MONTENEGRO

SELECT YOUR NATIONALITY

– No current scheduled consular closures.
CONSULAR CLOSURES
THE EMBASSY OF AFGHANISTAN IN LONDON IS CLOSED:
No current scheduled consular closures
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Monastery of Ostrog
Location: Danilovgrad Municipality, Montenegro
The Monastery of Ostrog is a monastery of the Serbian Orthodox Church situated against an almost vertical background, high up in the large rock of Ostroška Greda, in Montenegro. It is dedicated to Saint Basil of Ostrog (Sveti Vasilije Ostroški), who was buried here. From the monastery, a superb view of the Bjelopavlići plain can be seen.

The Monastery was founded by Vasilije, the Metropolitan Bishop of Herzegovina in the 17th century. He died there in 1671 and some years later he was glorified. His body is enshrined in a reliquary kept in the cave-church dedicated to the Presentation of the Mother of God to the Temple.

The Orthodox monastery of Ostrog is one of the most frequently visited on the Balkans. It attracts over 100,000 visitors a year. It is visited by believers from all parts of the world, either individually or in groups. It represents the meeting place of all confessions: the Orthodox, the Catholics and the Muslims. According to the stories of pilgrims, by praying by his body, many have been cured and helped in lessening the difficulties in their lives.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ostrog_Monastery
Name: Our Lady of the Rocks
Location: Bay of Kotor, Montenegro
Our Lady of the Rocks is one of the two islets off the coast of Perast in Bay of Kotor, Montenegro (the other being Sveti Đorđe Island). It is an artificial island created by bulwark of rocks and by sinking old and seized ships loaded with rocks. The Roman Catholic Church of Our Lady of the Rocks is the largest building on the islet; it has a museum attached. There is also a small gift shop close to the church and a navigation light at the western end of the islet.

According to legend, the islet was made over the centuries by local seamen who kept an ancient oath after finding the icon of Madonna and Child on the rock in the sea on July 22, 1452. Upon returning from each successful voyage, they laid a rock in the Bay. Over time, the islet gradually emerged from the sea. The custom of throwing rocks into the sea is alive even nowadays. Every year on the sunset of July 22, an event called fašinada in the local dialect, when local residents take their boats and throw rocks into the sea, widening the surface of the island, takes place.

The church contains 68 paintings by Tripo Kokolja, a famous 17th-century baroque artist from Perast.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Lady_of_the_Rocks
Name: Lovćen
Location: Montenegro
Lovćen is a mountain and national park in southwestern Montenegro. It is the inspiration behind the name of Montenegro; Crna Gora (Black Mountain), was first mentioned in a charter issued by Stefan Milutin in 1276, the name Montenegro deriving from the appearance of Mount Lovćen when covered in dense forests.

Mount Lovćen rises from the borders of the Adriatic basin, closing the long and twisting bays of Boka Kotorska and making the hinterland to the coastal town of Kotor. The mountain has two imposing peaks, Štirovnik; 1,749 m (5,738 ft) and Jezerski vrh; 1,657 m (5,436 ft).

The mountain slopes are rocky, with numerous fissures, pits and deep depressions giving its scenery a specific look. Lovćen stands on the border between two completely different natural wholes, the sea and the mainland, and so it is under the influence of both climates. The specific connection of the life conditions has caused the development of the different biological systems. There are 1,158 plant species on Lovćen, four of which are endemic.

SORUCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lovćen
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN MONTENEGRO / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO MONTENEGRO.
FACTS:
Official Languages: Montenegrin
Currency: Euro (EUR)
Time zone: CET (UTC+1) / CEST (UTC+2)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +382
Local / up-to-date weather in Podgorica (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Montenegro travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Montenegro, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO MONTENEGRO.

Montenegro uses the euro, like several other European countries. One euro is divided into 100 cents. The official symbol for the euro is €, and its ISO code is EUR. There is no official symbol for the cent.

All banknotes and coins of this common currency are legal tender within all the countries, except that low-denomination coins (one and two cent) are phased out in some of them. The banknotes look the same across countries, while coins have a standard common design on one side and a national country-specific design on the other. The latter side is also used for different designs of commemorative coins. The design on the national side does not affect the use of the coin.

  • ATMs: Hundreds of ATMs are available in major cities. The ATMs accept most international Visa and MasterCard credit and debit cards. If you are from the Balkans, Central or Eastern Europe, look for an ATM of your bank. It is quite possible that the bank operates in Montenegro and that there will be no fees.
  • Credit cards: although they are accepted in supermarkets, hotels, restaurants and many shops, always keep some cash with you for open-air markets, souvenir stalls, small bakeries, museums and public transport.
  • Exchange offices: Not very common, since nearly all tourists bring euros with them. In case you happen to arrive in Montenegro without any euros in cash, use an ATM (recommended) or find a bank to change US dollars, Swiss francs or British pounds.

BY TRAIN:

There is local train service, operating from Bar, through Podgorica and Kolasin and Mojkovac to Bijelo Polje. It is the cheapest way to travel from north to south and vice versa, the quality of service is not on the high level. The level of quality should be up with European standards.

Montenegro Railways has reactivated the train route to Niksic, providing a scenic and pretty cheap journey, without being slower than the bus.

BY BUS:

This may be the easiest way to get around Montenegro. Buses are frequent (especially during the summer), safe and are more or less on schedule. Ticket prices within Montenegro are all under €15. Examples of prices: Podgorica-Ulcinj €6, Podgorica-Cetinje €3, Cetinje-Kotor €5. Local buses usually have no airconditioning.

Besides the buses, there are minibuses at bus stations that are usually slightly cheaper, and are a faster and more comfortable option.

BY CAR:

As there is no real highway in Montenegro; most roads are two-lane only, with frequent addition of a third overtaking lane, and generally are not up to European standards. Most roads are curvy and mountainous, so speeds over 80 km/h (50 mph) are rarely legal, and rarely safe.

The speed limit is 80 km/h (50 mph) on the open road, unless signs specify otherwise. The speed limit inside the cities is 50 km/h (31 mph).

The use of safety belts and headlights during the day is compulsory, and the use of cellphones while driving is prohibited. Signposts used in Montenegro are almost identical to those used in EU countries.

Local drivers tend to drive fast, and to get involved into dangerous overtakings. Traffic jams are common during the peak of the summer season. Pedestrians are noutorious for jaywalking in every Montenegrin city.

Drivers tend to be extremely vocal, so don’t take it personally if a driver yells at you.

You can rent a car in Montenegroin Tivat Airport from €11, in Podgorica Airport from €14 and travel around cities and across the country.

SPECIFIC ROADS:

Roads from Podgorica to Bar and to Niksic are fairly good and easy to drive on.

The roads from Podgorica through Cetinje to Budva and to Petrovac are both in good condition, but are curvy mountainous roads which rarely permit speeds over 70 km/h.

The road from Podgorica north to Kolasin, and then on to Zabljak or Serbia, is considered dangerous during the winter, especially the part through the Moraca canyon. It is recommended that you take the bus to the north during the cold or rainy days, as bus drivers are experienced and know the road.

The old road from Cetinje to Kotor is mostly a narrow one-lane road offering stunning views of Kotor from above, but exercise extreme caution when passing on-coming traffic, over-taking and around corners.

BY RENTAL CAR:

Rent-a-car business are numerous and prices start from €20 per day for Toyota Yaris.

BY HELICOPTER:

A unique opportunity to discover the wild beauty of Montenegro is also by helicopter. Transportation could be organised from Dubrovnik, Kotor, Budva, Podgorica. Well-established operators are specialized in scenic flights, charters and commercial transfers across the region.

EAT:

Apart from the hotels located in towns and summer resorts offering half-board and full-board accommodation, and those along the roads and communication lines such as restaurants, pizza places, taverns, fast food restaurants and cafes, there is a choice of national restaurants offering traditional Montenegrin cuisine.

In addition to the standard European and Mediterranean cuisine, Montenegro offers a variety of healthy food products and local specialities.

Cold hors-d’oeuvres include the famous njeguški pršut (smoked ham) and njeguški cheese, pljevaljski cheese, mushrooms, donuts and dried bleak. The main courses specific for the northern mountainous region are boiled lamb, lamb cooked in milk, cicvara in fresh milk cream (buttered corn porridge), boiled potatoes with cheese and fresh cream. A selection of traditional recipes of the central and coastal parts will include the kastradina (dried mutton), smoked and fresh carp (from Skadar lake) and a variety of fresh sea fish and seafood dishes. Donuts served with honey and dried figs are traditional desserts in these parts of Montenegro.

Products of animal origin are supervised and approved by veterinary and health authorities according to EU standards. The restaurant scene in Montenegro is rapidly evolving and has become increasingly international and continues to attract a new diverse variety of restaurants on the coast and in Podgorica.

DRINK:

Wine:

Montenegrin vineyards and the production of quality wine is part of the tradition of southern and coastal wine makers.

The best known Montenegrin wines are the premium whites: “Krstač”, “Cabernet”, “Chardonnay” and reds: “Vranac”, “Pro Corde”. All of them are produced by the famous company “Plantaže”, but there’s also some home-made wines of high quality, like Crmničko wine.

1L bottle of “Vranac” red wine will cost you from €8 to €15 in the bar or restaurant and it is well worth it! Also, you can buy a bottle of “Plantaze”‘s wine for about €2-4 in supermarkets.

Also, Montenegro has boutique wineries as Knezevic from Golubovci and famous brand “Monte Grande” became signature wine of the country.

Brandy:

The continental region and north are more oriented towards the production of aromatic fruit flavoured brandy (plum brandy – šljivovica, apple brandy – jabukovača). Grape brandy “Montenegrin loza”, “Prvijenac”, “Kruna” or home made grape brandy (lozova rakija, lozovača) is a must-try, and a good choice to “warm up” before going out in the evening.

Beer:

“Nikšićko” beer is the best known beer in the Montenegro, and most common alcoholic beverage, which cost from €0.50 to €2.50. It is produced as a draught beer, or bottled, in both “Nik Gold” and lighter “Nik Cool” variant. The dark variant, “Nik tamno”, is praised among beer lovers.

Montenegro is generally a safe country. There is, like all countries in the world, criminal activities, but police forces are generally fast in their duties. The number is 122, as well as the international distress call 112. When travelling in the areas bordering Kosovo, it is recommended you keep to the main roads. Unexploded landmines may remain along the Kosovo border. You should also avoid areas where there is military activity.

In the resort towns such as Kotor, Budva, Sveti Stefan and Herceg Novi, beggars and pickpockets are not uncommon. As in many other European locations, beggars are part of organized crime groups. Do not give them money. Doing so may also make you a target for more aggressive approaches. Always carry your bags in the safest way, slung around your shoulder with the pouch in front (with your money carried under your clothing) where you can keep your arm or hand across it.

Sea urchins are small, globular, spiny sea creatures that cover much of the sea floor off the coast of Montenegro. This isn’t a bad thing being as they only gather in super clear water. It’s a good idea to wear sea socks or something to cover your feet while walking through the water. Also, if you snorkel, be careful and ensure you don’t brush up against the ones on the sides of the rocks.

Montenegrins are not safe drivers. You will often feel as though you are competing for road space with aggressive drivers who have little regard for your or their own safety. Many people also break the speed limits. Some roads are really narrow. Consequently, the country has one of the highest rates of traffic accident fatalities in Europe.

There are two species of viper snakes in Montenegro, sarka and poskok. Both are small but very venomous, so be careful when you hike around, watch your steps and remember that they never attack people if they are not disturbed.

LOCAL SPECIALITIES:

  • Cheese
  • Smoked ham
  • Traditional clothes
  • Souvenirs

CLOTHES AND SHOES:

City stores:

  • City centre and Bulevar Džordža Vašingtona in Podgorica
  • Porto Montenegro
  • many shops in Old Towns of Kotor and Budva

Shopping malls:

  • Delta City in Podgorica
  • TQ Centre in Budva
  • Kamelija in Kotor

Convenience shops & supermarkets:

  • Voli markets, HD Laković, Maxi Markets and Roda are main retail supermarket chains and are found in almost all cities. There are also other convenience stores that stuff various goods. The prices of basic local food (baked goods, dairy products, fresh fruit and vegetables) are on the level of Bosnia and Serbia, i.e. generally cheaper than EU countries.
**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Montenengro
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Monastery of Ostrog
Location: Danilovgrad Municipality, Montenegro
The Monastery of Ostrog is a monastery of the Serbian Orthodox Church situated against an almost vertical background, high up in the large rock of Ostroška Greda, in Montenegro. It is dedicated to Saint Basil of Ostrog (Sveti Vasilije Ostroški), who was buried here. From the monastery, a superb view of the Bjelopavlići plain can be seen.

The Monastery was founded by Vasilije, the Metropolitan Bishop of Herzegovina in the 17th century. He died there in 1671 and some years later he was glorified. His body is enshrined in a reliquary kept in the cave-church dedicated to the Presentation of the Mother of God to the Temple.

The Orthodox monastery of Ostrog is one of the most frequently visited on the Balkans. It attracts over 100,000 visitors a year. It is visited by believers from all parts of the world, either individually or in groups. It represents the meeting place of all confessions: the Orthodox, the Catholics and the Muslims. According to the stories of pilgrims, by praying by his body, many have been cured and helped in lessening the difficulties in their lives.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ostrog_Monastery
Name: Our Lady of the Rocks
Location: Bay of Kotor, Montenegro
Our Lady of the Rocks is one of the two islets off the coast of Perast in Bay of Kotor, Montenegro (the other being Sveti Đorđe Island). It is an artificial island created by bulwark of rocks and by sinking old and seized ships loaded with rocks. The Roman Catholic Church of Our Lady of the Rocks is the largest building on the islet; it has a museum attached. There is also a small gift shop close to the church and a navigation light at the western end of the islet.

According to legend, the islet was made over the centuries by local seamen who kept an ancient oath after finding the icon of Madonna and Child on the rock in the sea on July 22, 1452. Upon returning from each successful voyage, they laid a rock in the Bay. Over time, the islet gradually emerged from the sea. The custom of throwing rocks into the sea is alive even nowadays. Every year on the sunset of July 22, an event called fašinada in the local dialect, when local residents take their boats and throw rocks into the sea, widening the surface of the island, takes place.

The church contains 68 paintings by Tripo Kokolja, a famous 17th-century baroque artist from Perast.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Lady_of_the_Rocks
Name: Lovćen
Location: Montenegro
Lovćen is a mountain and national park in southwestern Montenegro. It is the inspiration behind the name of Montenegro; Crna Gora (Black Mountain), was first mentioned in a charter issued by Stefan Milutin in 1276, the name Montenegro deriving from the appearance of Mount Lovćen when covered in dense forests.

Mount Lovćen rises from the borders of the Adriatic basin, closing the long and twisting bays of Boka Kotorska and making the hinterland to the coastal town of Kotor. The mountain has two imposing peaks, Štirovnik; 1,749 m (5,738 ft) and Jezerski vrh; 1,657 m (5,436 ft).

The mountain slopes are rocky, with numerous fissures, pits and deep depressions giving its scenery a specific look. Lovćen stands on the border between two completely different natural wholes, the sea and the mainland, and so it is under the influence of both climates. The specific connection of the life conditions has caused the development of the different biological systems. There are 1,158 plant species on Lovćen, four of which are endemic.

SORUCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lovćen
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN MONTENEGRO / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

Global Immigration Leader, Big 4

“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

Internal stakeholder, Big 4

“Manny is a big reason why the move from (external provider) to the UK firm’s passport and visa provision has been so smooth. He’s an extremely likeable honest hard working guy who takes his role very seriously. We’re very fortunate to have him leading our dedicated team”

External client, Private practice

“Most of my contact was with Manpreet Singh Johal. He did the best job someone could imagine. Extraordinary service from his side.”

Team member, Big 4

“Working on two priority accounts is naturally pressurised especially where he has also been responsible for billing on both accounts; yet Manny delivers every time and this I believe is an exceptional quality.”

Please think before printing – click here for more info

WEB LINKS

LOCATIONS