NEW ZEALAND

NEW ZEALAND

NEW ZEALAND

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Name: Milford Sound
Location: New Zealand
Milford Sound is a fiord in the south west of New Zealand's South Island within Fiordland National Park. It has been judged the world's top travel destination in an international survey (the 2008 Travelers' Choice Destinations Awards by TripAdvisor) and is acclaimed as New Zealand's most famous tourist destination. Rudyard Kipling had previously called it the eighth Wonder of the World.

Seals, penguins, and southernmost population of bottlenose dolphins frequent the waters, and whales especially humpback whales and southern right whales are increasingly observed due to recoveries of each species. The sound has been identified as an Important Bird Area by BirdLife International because it is a breeding site for Fiordland penguins.

Milford Sound attracts between 550,000 and 1 million visitors per year. This makes the sound one of New Zealand's most-visited tourist spots even with its remote location and long journey times from the nearest population centres. Many tourists take one of the boat tours which usually last one to two hours. They are offered by several companies, departing from the Milford Sound Visitors' Centre.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milford_Sound
Name: Aoraki / Mount Cook
Location: New Zealand
Aoraki / Mount Cook is the highest mountain in New Zealand. Its height since 2014 is listed as 3,724 metres , down from 3,764 m before December 1991, due to a rockslide and subsequent erosion. It lies in the Southern Alps, the mountain range which runs the length of the South Island. A popular tourist destination, it is also a favourite challenge for mountain climbers. Aoraki / Mount Cook consists of three summits, from South to North the Low Peak (3,593 m), Middle Peak (3,717 m) and High Peak. The summits lie slightly south and east of the main divide of the Southern Alps, with the Tasman Glacier to the east and the Hooker Glacier to the southwest.

Aoraki / Mount Cook is a technically challenging mountain to climb with a high level of glaciation. Its level of difficulty is often underestimated and can change dramatically depending on weather, snow and ice conditions. The climb crosses large crevasses, and involves risks of ice and rock falls, avalanches and rapidly changing weather conditions. Since the early 20th century, around 80 people have died attempting to climb the mountain, making it New Zealand's deadliest peak.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aoraki_/_Mount_Cook
Name: Abel Tasman National Park
Location: Tasman District, New Zealand
Abel Tasman National Park is a New Zealand national park located between Golden Bay and Tasman Bay at the north end of the South Island. It is named after Abel Tasman, who in 1642 became the first European explorer to sight New Zealand and who anchored nearby in Golden Bay.

The park was founded in 1942, largely through the efforts of ornithologist and author Pérrine Moncrieff to have land reserved for the purpose. The park was opened on the 18 December 1942 to mark the 300th anniversary of Abel Tasman's visit. Those in attendance at the opening ceremony at Tarakohe included Charles van der Plas, as personal representative of the Netherlands' Queen, Wilhelmina.

The idea for the park had been under consideration since June 1938. The Crown set aside 15,225 hectares, comprising 8,900 hectares of proposed state forest, 5,809 hectares of Crown land and 554 hectares of other reserve land for the national park. The area's primary historic interest was the visit of Tasman in 1642, D'Urville in 1827, and the New Zealand Company barques Whitby and Will Watch, and brig Arrow in 1841. The site was also of significant botanical interest.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abel_Tasman_National_Park
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
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COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO NEW ZEALAND.
FACTS:
Official Languages: English / Māori
Currency: New Zealand Dollar (NZD)
Time zone: NZST (New Zealand Standard Time) (UTC+12) / NZDT (New Zealand Daylight Time) (UTC+13)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +64
Local / up-to-date weather in Auckland (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for New Zealand travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to New Zealand, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO NEW ZEALAND.

The currency used in New Zealand is the New Zealand dollar, denoted by the symbol “$” or “NZ$” (ISO code: NZD). It is divided into 100 cents. In this guide, the “$” symbol denotes New Zealand dollars unless otherwise indicated.

The New Zealand dollar is free-floating, however barring a major change in the international market, exchange rates are generally stable. Payment in foreign currencies is not readily accepted. Some hotels and stores in tourist hotspots may accept foreign notes, but expect the exchange rate to be poor (e.g. Australian dollars being accepted at 1:1). As the New Zealand dollar is one of the world’s most actively traded currencies (10th most traded as of April 2016), it is widely available in banks and money changers throughout the world.

Coins come in 10¢ (copper), 20¢ (small silver), 50¢ (large silver), $1 (small gold) and $2 (large gold). All the coins feature Queen Elizabeth II on the “heads” side. In 2006, New Zealand phased out the 5¢ coin and replaced the 10¢, 20¢ and 50¢ coins with smaller versions. Prior to the change, the 5¢, 10¢ and 20¢ coins were identical their Australian counterparts, save for different “tails” side, meaning it was common to see Australian coins in New Zealand circulation and vice versa. Since there is no coin smaller than 10¢, cash transactions are rounded to the nearest 10¢ (5¢ can round either way, but most businesses round down).

Banknotes come in $5 (orange), $10 (blue), $20 (green), $50 (purple), and $100 (red). All the notes in circulation are printed on polymer, with the front side featuring a notable New Zealander (except for the $20 note, which features Queen Elizabeth II) and the rear side featuring a native New Zealand bird. There are two series of banknotes in circulation, the 1999 series (small transparent window) and the 2015-16 series (large transparent window).

BY BUS:

Buses are a relatively cheap and environmentally friendly way to get around New Zealand. Services are usually only once a day, even between major towns. Most roads in New Zealand are quite narrow and winding (when compared to the highways of the USA), and travelling a long distance in a bus can be a safe and relaxing way to travel compared with driving yourself. Booking in advance can get you great bargains on some lines.

  • Flying Kiwi Adventures. Trips range from 3 to 27 days and cover both main islands. The tours focus on enjoying outdoor beauty and excitement with numerous hiking, cycling and activity options. There are also options to take extended breaks in your favourite places. Discounts are available for holders of YHA, VIP, ISIC and NOMADs cards.
  • New Zealand’s national coach company, with services connecting over 600 destinations nationwide. InterCity Group has voluntarily adopted European Emission standards across its fleet of modern coaches. Operates the InterCity and Newmans lines, and a fleet of modern vessels and coaches for GreatSights New Zealand, Fullers GreatSights Bay of Islands and awesomeNZ. InterCity Group is part of Landcare Research’s carboNZero programme, which has a core focus on working to reduce harmful emissions at source. Tickets can be purchased from the InterCity ticket counters at bus stations or i-SITE information centres and a discount is given to students or youth-hostel membership card holders (e.g. BBH, YHA, Nomads, ISIC). Fares start from $1 (plus a booking fee) on all InterCity’s national services and they’ve even been known to give away free seats at various times of the year. A limited number of heavily discounted “Cheap-as-Seats” for travel that week are released via the company’s Facebook and Twitter feeds every Monday. Online fares are often sold at a cheaper rate.
    • Travelpass. A pass offered by InterCity that brings together an extensive range of “hop on and off” fixed itinerary passes, based on the most popular touring routes throughout New Zealand. National passes include the Interislander ferry and a scenic boat cruise in Milford Sound. Passes are valid for 1 year.
    • Flexi-Pass. Utilising the combined national networks of InterCity, Newmans and GreatSights, Flexi-Pass is sold in blocks of time, just like a prepaid phone card, and enables the holder to travel anywhere on the company’s network. Passes start at 15 hr, which is enough to travel from Auckland to Wellington in the North Island. Flexi-Pass hours can also be used to travel on the Interislander ferry and on Fullers GreatSights Bay of Islands Dolphin Watching cruises and tours to Cape Brett and the famous “Hole in the Rock”. Passes can also be sold on to third parties and are valid for 1 year.
  • Atomic Shuttles operate a no-frills shuttle service in parts of the South Island.
  • Knight Rider. Transport between Christchurch and Dunedin daily.
  • West Coast Shuttle. Daily transport from Greymouth to Christchurch (via Arthur’s Pass) and return at more affordable prices than some of the larger firms.
  • Backpacker buses – KiwiExperience Backpacker Bus and Stray Travel Bus offer bus trips around New Zealand where you can get on and off as you please after purchasing a pass.
  • Skip Bus operates express bus services across major cities in the North Island, like Auckland, Whangarei, Hamilton, Tauranga, Rotorua, Wellington.
  • Naked Bus and Mana Bus ceased operation in July 2018.

BY PLANE:

Domestic flights in New Zealand can be expensive; some domestic flights can cost as much as a flight to Australia. However, flying often works out cheaper than driving or taking a train, especially when crossing between the North and South Islands.

Airlines operate an electronic ticket system. You can book on-line, by telephone, or through a travel agent. Photo ID will be needed for travel.

Check-in times are usually at least 30 minutes prior to flight departure. Cabin baggage and personal scanning are routinely conducted for services from the major airports that have jet landings.

  • Air New Zealand has the most extensive domestic network, serving most cities over 20,000 people, with jet services between main centres and smaller turboprop aircraft elsewhere. Free baggage allowance is 1 piece of baggage weighing 23 kg on Grabaseat+Bag, Saver and Flexi fares; standard Grabaseat fares don’t include checked baggage. All fares include 7 kg carry-on baggage.
  • Jetstar is a budget no-frills carrier that flies to Auckland, Christchurch, Dunedin, Napier, Nelson, New Plymouth, Palmerston North, Queenstown and Wellington. Don’t be late for check-in – they are very strict about check-in close times.

Auckland, Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington airports have timetabled buses to the airport. Regional airports generally have only on-demand shuttle services and taxis.

BY MOTOR VEHICLE:

You can reach most of New Zealand’s sights in a two-wheel-drive car, motorcycle or even a small camper van. While public transport is usable in the cities of Auckland and Wellington, a car is almost essential to get around anywhere else.

Traffic drives on the left in New Zealand. The State Highway network connects major cities and destinations within the two main islands, and are indicated by a number inside a red shield. Motorways and expressways are generally only found near major cities, with most intercity driving done on undivided highways with one lane in each direction and limited overtaking opportunities. Be prepared to get caught behind slow-moving vehicles, and expect drivers behind you to become impatient if you drive slowly without a reason. If you are driving slowly and traffic builds up behind you, find a safe place to pull over and let them pass.

You can legally drive for up to 12 months if you are at least 18 years old and have a current full driving licence from your home country. It must be in English or you must have an approved English translation such as an International Driving Permit (IDP) to accompany it. You must carry your licence at all times when driving. All drivers and passengers must wear a seat belt, and children must be seated in an approved child restraint until their 7th birthday. Talking or using a mobile phone while driving is illegal.

Speed limits are generally 50 km/h in urban areas, and 100 km/h in rural areas and on motorways. A select few motorways and expressways have 110 km/h limits. Heavy vehicles and towing vehicles have a blanket maximum limit of 90 km/h. Being caught 40 km/h or more over the posted limit will result in a 28-day roadside suspension and most likely an appearance in court on dangerous driving charges.

The blood alcohol limit in New Zealand is 0.05% (0.00% if aged under 20). A police officer can pull you over and ask you to undergo a breath alcohol screening test without reason. Refusing a breath screening test will usually result in arrest. Being caught more than 0.03% over the limit will result in an appearance in court, which will result in at least 6 months disqualification from driving and a hefty fine.

Some petrol stations in major towns and cities are open 24 hours, with most other manned petrol stations closing by 10PM. There are 24-hour unmanned petrol stations around the country, which accept national and international debit/credit cards with a PIN; very rarely do these sites accept cash. Petrol prices vary by region: $1.90-2.15/L for regular unleaded petrol, and $1.30-1.45/L for diesel as of February 2019 (unlike petrol, diesel is not taxed at the pump and therefore the price is lower).

Electric vehicles make up around 0.25% of the vehicle fleet (as of September 2018), and there is a rapidly expanding network of fast charging stations across the country.

Campervan:

A campervan/motorhome provides considerable freedom and allows you to set your own schedule for travel around New Zealand by combining accommodation and transport. These practical vehicles are often equipped with two or more beds, a kitchenette, a shower and a toilet. They are generally suited for 2-6 people depending on the size.

Motorhome/campervan rentals are available in both the North Island and South Island. Some rental companies offer one way rentals so you can start and finish your travel in different locations. A minimum rental period is generally 5 days but can be up to 10 days during the peak season (especially Christmas/New Year).

Motorcyle:

New Zealand is a motorbike rider’s dream country! Rentals of many makes of motorcycles are available throughout New Zealand. The South Island is the main attraction for a motorcyclist and motorcycle tours base most of their time here. Remember to bring your full motorcycle licence from your home country; a standard car licence is not suffice to ride a motorcycle in New Zealand.

Rental:

Car rental firms range from the familiar multi-national big brands through to small local car rental firms. The advantage of the big name rental firms is they can be found throughout New Zealand and offer the biggest and newest range of rental vehicles. The disadvantage is that generally they are the most expensive. Occasionally rental firms offer free rental in the direction from south to north due to the majority of tourists travelling in the opposite direction, creating a deficit of cars in the north.

At the other end of the scale are the small local operators who typically have older rental cars. Whilst you may not end up driving this year’s latest model the advantage is that the smaller car rental firms can be substantially cheaper, so leaving you more money to spend on the many exciting attractions New Zealand offers. Between these extremes you will find a wide range of NZ car rental firms catering to different needs and budgets.

Other things to note are that most car hire firms require you to be 21 or over, hold a full licence and it will help if you have an international licence too. New Zealand rental vehicles may come with either a manual (stick-shift) or an automatic transmission; if you can’t drive a manual, make sure to specify an automatic transmission vehicle in advance. If you have a licence from a non-English speaking country, you will be required to have an official translation of that document to rent a vehicle. If you don’t have one at the counter, some companies are able to refer you to a service at a cost of about $80 and a delay of 1 to 2 hours.

Some rental car companies do not allow their vehicles on the Cook Strait ferries between the North and South Island, or only allow them on if you promise to return them back to their originating island. If you do return a rental car on the wrong island, expect to be charged upwards of $500 to repatriate the vehicle. Most rental car companies will allow you to drop off a car at one terminal, travel on the ferry and pick up another car at the other terminal at no extra cost.

Self-drive holidays are a great way to travel around New Zealand as they offer independence, flexibility and opportunities to interact with the locals. A number of companies offer inclusive self-drive holidays with rental car & accommodation, pre-set itineraries or customised to suit your interests.

Purchase and sale:

If you want to have an extended holiday in New Zealand and you would prefer to have your own transport, it may be cheaper to buy a car or van and resell it just before leaving. If you use this method, travel across Cook Strait can be expensive. If purchasing a car for $500 or less it may be cheaper to buy and sell a car in each island separately. However, if you buy your car in Christchurch, tour the South island and then travel North to sell in Auckland, you can take advantage of the buyers market in Christchurch and the sellers market in Auckland and possibly even make a small profit. In addition to the usual ways to look for a car (newspapers, accommodation noticeboards, car markets etc.) New Zealand’s biggest on-line auction website Trademe have many listings. You can also try the backpackers car market where there are usually people selling their cars off cheaply. Car auctions can also be a suitable option if you are looking to buy a car. Turner’s Auctions have regular auctions and are based in many cities. Look out for “Repo” auctions, where the cars being sold are as a result of repossession. Should any previous ownership problems have existed, these will have been resolved before auction commences.

When you buy and sell a vehicle, you need to notify the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) and (if you are buying) pay the appropriate fee. It is very important to notify the NZTA if you are selling since this limits your liability for any subsequent costs (overdue licence fees, speed camera tickets, etc.). Other obligations as a vehicle owner include paying the licence fees (“rego”) and having a current Warrant of Fitness (WoF). Diesel vehicles owners also have to pay Road User Charges (RUC) since diesel is not taxed at the pump. Third party insurance to cover your liability in an accident is not mandatory but is highly recommended. The Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) automatically covers you for personal injuries in car accidents (see Stay healthy below for more information).

BY TRAIN:

Both Auckland and Wellington have commuter rail services. Auckland’s network is managed by Auckland Transport, and has four lines spreading from Britomart station in the city centre to Swanson in the west, Onehunga in the southwest, Papakura and Pukekohe in the south, and Manukau in the south-east; there is no rail to the North Shore or to eastern Auckland. Wellington’s network is managed by Metlink, and has four lines spreading north from Wellington station serving Wellington’s northern suburbs, Porirua, the Kapiti Coast (as far north as Waikanae), Lower Hutt and Upper Hutt. A fifth service, the Wairarapa Connection, travels several times daily to Masterton in the Wairarapa via Upper Hutt and the 8.8 km Rimutaka Tunnel.

Long distance passenger-rail services are slow and limited in New Zealand, and are largely used for tourism purposes rather than as actual practical travel options, with the bulk of New Zealand’s rail traffic being used for freight transport.

Inter-city passenger services are operated by KiwiRail Scenic Journeys, with just a few popular tourist services that pass through spectacular scenery and have a running commentary, panoramic windows and an open-air viewing carriage.

  • Northern Explorer (replaced the Overlander) – a modern train that now operates 3 days a week all year. It heads south from Auckland to Wellington on Mondays, Thursdays and Saturdays and in the opposite direction on Tuesdays, Fridays and Sundays. This is reckoned by many to be one of the world’s most scenic rail journeys.
  • Capital Connection – commuter service leaves from Palmerston North to Wellington in the morning, returning in the evening.
  • Coastal Pacific – from Christchurch to Picton (via Kaikoura) and return daily. Travels along the rugged north-east coast of the South Island with terrific sea views. Meets the Picton–Wellington ferry. Oct–Apr only.
  • TranzAlpine – from Christchurch to Greymouth and return daily. Classed as one of the world’s great train journeys, this trip crosses the South Island, passing through spectacular mountain scenery, some of which is inaccessible by road, and the 8.5 km Otira Tunnel. Many visitors disembark at Arthur’s Pass National Park and spend four hours exploring the mountains before catching the return train.

The online booking site maximises overseas revenue by only showing the cheapest fares when it detects that you are accessing it from a New Zealand IP address. You may be able to get these cheaper fares if you wait until you arrive or book by phone. Seating on the Capital Connection is on a first-come-first-served basis and cannot be booked in advance.

Trains run at low speed, no faster than 110 km/h and can drop to 50 km/h in the summer due to the lack of track maintenance following privatisation in the 1990s. Most New Zealanders prefer to drive or fly long distances, as train fares are comparatively expensive. However, if time is not an issue, going through New Zealand by train is well worth the price-tag as you get breathtaking views you wouldn’t get from a car and can wander around the train while someone else does all the driving – benefits no other mode of transportation offers.

All long distance trains have a dining car and you can pre-order your food and have a look at the menu online.

BY FERRY:

Between the North and South Islands:

There are two passenger and car ferry operators which cross Cook Strait between Wellington in the North Island and Picton in the South Island. The journey lasts 3.5 hours and there are several sailings daily. It is a spectacular and scenic trip through Wellington Harbour, Cook Strait and the Marlborough Sounds. However, the weather and seas in Cook Strait are frequently rough and unpredictable; sailings can be delayed or cancelled due to stormy weather, while others can quickly turn from a Mediterranean cruise into a spew-fest. Make sure you pack essentials for every possible weather situation in your carry-on luggage; you can’t return to your car once the ferry has left port.

The ferry terminal at Picton is close to the railway station, and the Coastal Pacific train connects with Interislander sailings.

It is essential to book vehicle crossings in advance. The busiest period is from late December to February. Foot passenger traffic is also heavy at this time, and it is advisable to book well in advance.

Check with your rental car company whether you can take your vehicle on the Cook Strait ferry: some do not allow their vehicles on the ferries but will happily allow you to drop off a car at one ferry terminal and pick up another car at the other terminal at no extra cost.

  • Interislander, +64 4 498-3302, toll-free: 0800 802 802. Contact centre M–F 08:00–20:00, Sa–Su 08:00–18:00. Operates three ships: Aratere, Kaiarahi and Kaitaki.
  • Bluebridge (Strait Shipping), +64 4 471-6188, toll-free: 0800 844 844. Contact centre 08:00-20:00 daily. Operates two ships: Straitsman and Strait Feronia

Other ferries:

Harbour ferries, for commuters, operate in Auckland and Wellington. A number of communities are served by boat, rather than road, while charter boats are available for expeditions in several places. There are regular sightseeing cruises in several tourist destinations, particularly in the Southern Lakes and Fiordland area.

BY BICYCLE:

You can bring your own bike or hire one in some of the larger cities. By law, you must wear a helmet while riding, otherwise you may be issued an on-the-spot penalty. When hiring a bike you should be supplied with a helmet. Remember to ride on the left. You cannot ride on motorways in New Zealand – be aware that the Auckland Harbour Bridge between downtown Auckland and the North Shore is a motorway and there is no separate cycle path (yet), so you’ll have to take a ferry or cycle around the harbour.

Cycling in New Zealand can be fun, but be aware that because of the geography and small number of people cycling between towns there are very few cycle lanes and limited shoulder space on roads. Beware of buses and trucks on main highways as many drivers will not give you sufficient overtaking clearance; proportionately, five times as many cyclists are injured and killed on New Zealand roads as in the Netherlands or Singapore! You should also be prepared for the large distances between towns and cities and the generally windy weather. While some areas of New Zealand are flat, most tourists cycling in New Zealand will find that they need to be able to cope with long periods of cycling up hills, especially in the Coromandel. Be prepared for any weather and for all seasons in one day.

You can choose to get a bike on arrival in New Zealand, or use a self-guided or guided cycle tour operator. Christchurch had the largest number of guided and self-guided tour operators and there are a number of bike rental companies based there also.

A network of cycle trails is being built around New Zealand, using a combination of off-road cycleways and low-traffic roads. There are some safe and beautiful routes already constructed: NZ Cycle Trail.

EAT:

Modern New Zealand cuisine has been influenced mainly by the country’s British heritage, although immigration since the 1950s has put Mediterranean and Asia-Pacific twists to it. Māori have their own distinctive traditional cuisine.

The evening meal, called dinner or tea, is considered the main meal of the day. Snack breaks between meals are referred to as morning/afternoon tea.

New Zealanders typically only go out for dinner at a restaurant on special occasions such as birthdays or on romantic dates; most don’t eat out on a highly frequent basis, although it is becoming more common. New Zealanders typically don’t ask for the restaurant bill at the table, but rather vacate the table and ask for the bill at the front counter or bar.

New Zealand has a distinctive café culture, with arguably some of the best espresso on the planet. Cafés often have excellent food, serving anything from a muffin to a full meal.

In smaller towns food is always available at the local pub/hotel/bistro, although the quality tends to be of the burger-and-chips variety.

Fast food and convenience food outlets are plentiful. Major international fast food chains with a presence in New Zealand include Burger King, Carl’s Jr., Domino’s, KFC, McDonald’s, Pita Pit, Pizza Hut, Subway and Wendy’s. There are a number of local fast food chains; Burger Fuel and Burger Wisconsin are both worth trying, while the American pizza chains face competition from satanic-themed local chain Hell Pizza. Chinese food in New Zealand is mostly of the Westernised takeaway variety, which is similar to that found in Australia or the United Kingdom, and can be found in many neighbourhoods and small towns. That being said, good, authentic Chinese food can be found in major cities such as Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch.

Most cafés and restaurants in New Zealand regularly cater for vegetarians, gluten-free and most single allergies. Cafés and restaurants catering for vegans and religious dietary requirements (e.g. halal, kosher) are hard to find outside the major cities.

If preparing food yourself, there are major supermarket chains: Countdown (green/black), New World (beige) and Pak’nSave (yellow). If you are looking for the lowest prices, Pak’nSave is probably your best bet, but they carry a limited range of brands. Countdown and New World both carry a full range, but keep an eye on the prices if you are on a budget. Smaller towns may have a Four Square, Fresh Choice or Super Value grocery store. There are dairies and other convenience stores throughout the populated areas.

Cuisine:

One of the most definitive guides to traditional New Zealand cuisine is the Edmonds Cookery Book. First published in 1908 and having gone through over a dozen revisions, it’s apparently more prolific in New Zealand homes than the Bible.

Distinctive New Zealand foods include:

  • ANZAC biscuits – plain hard biscuits made primarily from oatmeal bound with golden syrup. Originally made for and by ANZAC troops during the First World War. Also found in Australia.
  • Fish and chips – originally a British takeaway dish, New Zealand has its own unique style. Major fish species used are hoki, lemonfish (rig shark), and tarakihi, with bluefin gurnard and blue cod also featuring in the South Island. The fish is battered (or crumbed, if you prefer) and deep fried in oil together with chunky cut potato chips (fries) and a range of other meats, seafood, pineapple rings and even chocolate bars, all wrapped in newsprint paper (today unprinted food-grade paper is used; traditionally it was yesterday’s newspaper). Traditional condiments in New Zealand include tomato sauce (ketchup) and tartare sauce.
  • Kiwifruit – a plum-sized usually green-fleshed fruit, with fine black seeds in the flesh. While originating from China and first known to the home gardener as a Chinese gooseberry, New Zealand was the first country to selectively breed, commercially grow and export the fruit. Production today is centred on Te Puke but kiwifruit is also grown in many other horticultural areas. New Zealand kiwifruit is in season from April to January; out of season it is imported from the northern hemisphere (mainly Italy). Slices are often used as a topping on pavlova (see desserts section below). Caution: While the rest of the world calls this fruit “kiwi”, in New Zealand it’s always called “kiwifruit”. “Kiwi” refers to the flightless national bird, which is a protected species and killing one (let alone eating it) is a criminal offence.
  • Kūmara or sweet potato – roasted in the same manner as potatoes and often served instead of or alongside. May also be deep fried like potato chips and known as kūmara chips – nice served with sour cream, but rarely cooked well, because it cooks at a different temperature to potatoes, so it needs a skilled chef for the dish to be done perfectly. There are three main cultivars available: Owairaka Red (“red”), Toka Toka Gold (“gold”), and Beauregard (“orange”). Owairaka Red, with dark red/purple skin and creamy white flesh, is the most popular cultivar but is the tartest of the three. Kūmara are available year round with the new season starting in February. The main growing area is around Dargaville.
  • Pies – New Zealanders eat large numbers of non-flaky pastry pies containing savoury fillings that fit nicely in one hand (around 170 g/6 oz). Popular flavours include mince, mince & cheese, steak, steak & cheese, potato top mince, bacon & egg, and chicken & vegetable. The country even tried to take on the American fast-food giants with a pie-based chain (Georgie Pie), before it went bankrupt and all the assets sold off to McDonald’s. Some companies now market ranges of “gourmet” pies and there is an annual competition for the best pie in a variety of categories.

Seafood:

With no point of the country more than 130 km (80 mi) from the sea, fish and seafood (kaimoana) is fresh, varied and (in most part) plentiful. Shellfish is gathered from inter-tidal rocks and beaches and inshore fish caught on a line or with nets.

  • Bluff oysters (dredge oysters) – while found across New Zealand, the richest beds are in Foveaux Strait, out from the small port town of Bluff, hence the name. The harvesting season for the oysters runs from March to August.
  • Crayfish (spiny rock lobster; Māori kōura (papatea)) – caught all around New Zealand, but especially associated with the town of Kaikoura (whose name literally means “eat crayfish”).
  • Green-lipped mussels – easily distinguishable by their dark green to brown body with a bright green lip. They have been commercially farmed since the 1980s and are readily available in both processed and live form.
  • Pāua – the New Zealand blackfoot abalone is found in rocky sub-tidal waters. The meat is often tenderised (otherwise it has the consistency of rubber), chopped, formed into fritters with an egg-based batter and fried. The going market for pāua meat is $130-150 per kg, so be very wary of any pāua fritter sold for less than $10; the meat could have been sourced on the black market, if it contains any real pāua meat at all.
  • Whitebait – the translucent sprat or fingerlings of native freshwater fish species that migrate from spawning in the sea each year. After being caught in coastal river mouth set or hand nets during the spring (September to November), this highly sought after delicacy is rushed to all ends of the country. Often served in “whitebait fritters” (a fried patty of whitebait in an egg-based batter), they may be seasonally available from local fish and chip shops and are cooked without gutting or removing their heads, as they are tiny (2-7 mm broad).

Desserts and sweets:

  • Pavlova or pav – a dessert cake made of whipped egg whites and sugar and slowly baked to have a crusty meringue-like outside and a soft marshmallow-like middle, topped with whipped cream and decorated with sliced fruit. Pavlovas can be very finicky to bake and are notorious for deflating if cooled too quickly, so don’t expect the average New Zealand homemade pav to look like the picture. The dessert is also common in Australia, and there is much debate between the two countries as to where it was first invented!
  • Ice cream – New Zealanders consume an average 23 litres of ice cream per year, among the highest in the world. A unique Kiwi flavour is hokey pokey, which is vanilla ice cream containing small lumps of honeycomb toffee.
  • Lollies (sweets/candy) – iconic New Zealand lollies include pineapple lumps (pineapple-flavoured chewy toffee covered in chocolate), jaffas (chocolate balls inside a hard orange shell), and chocolate fish (fish-shaped marshmallow covered in chocolate).

Māori cuisine:

  • The hāngi or earth oven is the traditional way that Māori cook food for large gatherings. Meat, vegetables and sometimes puddings are slowly steam-cooked for several hours in a covered pit that has previously been lined with stones and had a hot wood fire burn down in it. The wood used in the fire is usually mānuka (New Zealand tea tree), which gives the hāngi its unique smoky flavour.

DRINK:

Alcoholic:

The minimum legal purchase age for alcohol in New Zealand is 18, and can only be supplied to under-18s via a parent or legal guardian. It is universal policy for bars and retailers to ask for photo identification from any patron who looks under the age of 25; the only acceptable forms of identification are a passport, a New Zealand driver licence, or an 18+ Card or a Kiwi Access Card issued by the Hospitality New Zealand (HNZ).

New Zealanders have a reputation for enjoying their beer, with the average Kiwi drinking 71 litres per year. Although there are now only three major breweries, there are many regional brands, each with their own distinctive taste and staunch supporters. Craft beer is also increasingly popular and available, especially in larger cities (and especially in Wellington). Look out for NZ beers like Tuatara, Garage Project or Epic, to give just a few examples. International brands such as Heineken, Guinness, Carlsberg and Budweiser are also available.

The New Zealand wine industry has developed into a significant export industry. The nation is now known internationally as one of the top producers of Sauvignon Blanc; over 70% of the country’s grape harvest of the variety. The Hawke’s Bay region is well known for its Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Chardonnay, and Viognier varieties. Marlborough is the largest wine producing region and famous for its Sauvignon Blanc. Waipara in North Canterbury specialises in Riesling and Pinot Gris, while the Wairarapa and Central Otago specialise in Pinot Noir. Many vineyards now offer winery tours, wine tasting and sales from the vineyard.

Take care when and where you indulge in public. New Zealand has liquor ban areas – that means alcoholic drinks cannot be consumed or even carried in some streets, such as city centres and popular beaches, at certain times of the day or night. Police can instruct you to empty bottles and arrest you if you do not comply. If you are found drunk and disorderly, the Police may detain you in custody until you sober up.

Non-alcoholic:

Coffeehouses are a daytime venue in many of the larger cities and tourist destinations. The café culture is notable in downtown Wellington, where many office workers have their tea breaks. Most coffee styles, cappuccino, latte, espresso/short black, long black, flat white, vienna etc., are usually available. Flat whites are probably the most popular. Cappuccinos are usually served with a choice of cinnamon or chocolate powder sprinkled on top. Its usual to request which one you want. Fluffies are a small frothed milk for children, sprinkled with chocolate powder.

L & P (Lemon & Paeroa) is a sweet, carbonated, lemonade-style drink said to be “world famous in New Zealand”. It is a sold in a brown plastic bottle with a yellow label similar to the traditional brown glass bottles it used to be sold in. While originally manufactured in its namesake, Paeroa in the Waikato, it is now manufactured in Auckland by Coca-Cola.

New Zealand offers a wide range of accommodation, from campsites and shared hostel rooms to international-quality luxury hotels in the major cities.

New Zealanders seem to have perfected the art of the top-dollar home-stay. Hosted luxury lodges are the top-end equivalent of the bed-and-breakfast market and New Zealand has upwards of 40 internationally recognised lodges. Per capita, that’s probably the highest in the world. They tend to be situated away from cities and can be difficult to get to, though some are right in the heart of the major centres. At the very top-end, helicopter transfers and private jets help the luxury traveller move between the lodges they’ve chosen for their visit.

Motels of a variety of standards from luxury to just adequate can be found on the approaches to most towns. Most New Zealand motels feature kitchenettes, usually with cooking utensils, pots and pans, crockery and cutlery, so the traveller can avoid the cost of eating out by self-catering from their motel bedroom. Heating can be a problem in winter though – while an increasing number of motels have their ceilings and walls insulated, double glazing is still uncommon. Small-scale central heating is also uncommon, and most motel rooms are heated by plug-in electric heating or gas heaters.

Bed and breakfasts are popular with visiting Brits and Swiss, as are homestays, farmstays and similar lodgings – some of which are in the most unlikely places. These can be a good choice if the traveller wants to benefit from local insider tips from the resident hosts, and many visitors welcome the opportunity to sample the rural life. For uniquely New Zealand accommodation, there are Māori homestays and tourist-catering marae stays.

There is a wide range of backpacker accommodation around these islands, including a 50-strong network of youth hostels (catering for independent travellers of any age) that are members of the Youth Hostels Association. There are also two marketing networks of independent hostels: BBH with 280+ listings and the much smaller Nomads network.

Holiday parks and motor camps provide sites for tents, caravans and campervans, with shared kitchens and bathroom facilities. Many also provide built accommodation, ranging from basic cabins to self-contained motel units. Many visitors travel around New Zealand in hired minibuses and vans, including self-contained campervans that can be driven by anyone who holds an ordinary car driver’s licence.

The Department of Conservation (DOC) provides camping sites in national parks and other conservation reserves. If you are travelling into the backcountry, the DOC has many back-country huts that can be used under a permit system.

Freedom camping outside of recognised and marked camping areas is decreasingly available. It used to be common to find a tent or hammock pitched for the night in many picnic areas or in a grove of trees off the road or anywhere else there wasn’t a “No Camping” sign. Due to growing local concerns about rubbish and human waste not being disposed of properly, together with moteliers resenting their falling incomes, many local authorities are now introducing tough restrictions with on-the-spot penalty notices being issued. Always dispose of all waste properly and leave your camping spots exactly as you found them (if not in better condition). Please respect this privilege and avoid leaving more ammunition for the people who want to restrict freedom camping even further. The Tourism Industry Association, DOC and the i-SITE network of information centres have produced a useful online map resource featuring over 1500 pay and free sites and based on Google maps.

New Zealand was one of the first countries in the world after the UK to develop a dense WWoOF network. “Willing Workers on Organic Farms” pioneered the concept of travellers (“WWoOFers”) staying as volunteers on farms and receiving food and accommodation in exchange for doing a half-day of work for each night they stay. The Nelson Tasman region in the South Island is particularly rich in WWOOFing possibilities. HelpX, which is similar to WWOOF but is not restricted to just organics, originated in and has its largest country network in New Zealand.

Couchsurfing is popular in New Zealand, with most major centres sporting active forums and groups, and having hosts all around the nation.

Qualmark, a government-owned organisation, provides a star rating system for accommodation and other tourism services.

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/New_Zealand
TOP ATTRACTIONS
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Name: Milford Sound
Location: New Zealand
Milford Sound is a fiord in the south west of New Zealand's South Island within Fiordland National Park. It has been judged the world's top travel destination in an international survey (the 2008 Travelers' Choice Destinations Awards by TripAdvisor) and is acclaimed as New Zealand's most famous tourist destination. Rudyard Kipling had previously called it the eighth Wonder of the World.

Seals, penguins, and southernmost population of bottlenose dolphins frequent the waters, and whales especially humpback whales and southern right whales are increasingly observed due to recoveries of each species. The sound has been identified as an Important Bird Area by BirdLife International because it is a breeding site for Fiordland penguins.

Milford Sound attracts between 550,000 and 1 million visitors per year. This makes the sound one of New Zealand's most-visited tourist spots even with its remote location and long journey times from the nearest population centres. Many tourists take one of the boat tours which usually last one to two hours. They are offered by several companies, departing from the Milford Sound Visitors' Centre.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milford_Sound
Name: Aoraki / Mount Cook
Location: New Zealand
Aoraki / Mount Cook is the highest mountain in New Zealand. Its height since 2014 is listed as 3,724 metres , down from 3,764 m before December 1991, due to a rockslide and subsequent erosion. It lies in the Southern Alps, the mountain range which runs the length of the South Island. A popular tourist destination, it is also a favourite challenge for mountain climbers. Aoraki / Mount Cook consists of three summits, from South to North the Low Peak (3,593 m), Middle Peak (3,717 m) and High Peak. The summits lie slightly south and east of the main divide of the Southern Alps, with the Tasman Glacier to the east and the Hooker Glacier to the southwest.

Aoraki / Mount Cook is a technically challenging mountain to climb with a high level of glaciation. Its level of difficulty is often underestimated and can change dramatically depending on weather, snow and ice conditions. The climb crosses large crevasses, and involves risks of ice and rock falls, avalanches and rapidly changing weather conditions. Since the early 20th century, around 80 people have died attempting to climb the mountain, making it New Zealand's deadliest peak.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aoraki_/_Mount_Cook
Name: Abel Tasman National Park
Location: Tasman District, New Zealand
Abel Tasman National Park is a New Zealand national park located between Golden Bay and Tasman Bay at the north end of the South Island. It is named after Abel Tasman, who in 1642 became the first European explorer to sight New Zealand and who anchored nearby in Golden Bay.

The park was founded in 1942, largely through the efforts of ornithologist and author Pérrine Moncrieff to have land reserved for the purpose. The park was opened on the 18 December 1942 to mark the 300th anniversary of Abel Tasman's visit. Those in attendance at the opening ceremony at Tarakohe included Charles van der Plas, as personal representative of the Netherlands' Queen, Wilhelmina.

The idea for the park had been under consideration since June 1938. The Crown set aside 15,225 hectares, comprising 8,900 hectares of proposed state forest, 5,809 hectares of Crown land and 554 hectares of other reserve land for the national park. The area's primary historic interest was the visit of Tasman in 1642, D'Urville in 1827, and the New Zealand Company barques Whitby and Will Watch, and brig Arrow in 1841. The site was also of significant botanical interest.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abel_Tasman_National_Park
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...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

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“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

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“Most of my contact was with Manpreet Singh Johal. He did the best job someone could imagine. Extraordinary service from his side.”

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