NIGERIA

NIGERIA

NIGERIA

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Name: Lekki Conservation Centre
Location: Lekki, Nigeria
The reserve area which covers a land area of 78 hectare is located on Lekki Peninsula, next to the Lekki Lagoon, and near the Lagos Lagoon. It protects the wetlands of the Lekki peninsula which consists of swamp and savannah habitats. Approaching the reserve, there's a boulevard of coconut trees which leads to a well laid out car and Visitors Park. It is endowed with an abundance of plant and animal life. Its huge tract of wetlands is set aside for wildlife viewing. Raised walkways enable viewing of animals like monkeys, crocodiles, snakes and various birds. There is also a conservation center and a library.

The wetlands are managed by the Nigerian Conservation Foundation, and it now includes a figure-of-eight system of footpaths, with hiking trails and stepping stones to cross waterways. A trail boardwalk was constructed in 1992 to enrich tourists view of the vast resources of the nature reserve which is encapsulated on a mangrove terrain. Side attractions along the trail includes swamp outlook, bird hide, rest stops and the tree house. The 1.8km nature trail behind the foremost main buildings is connected by two wooden tracks.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lekki_Conservation_Centre
Name: Zuma Rock
Location: Niger State, Nigeria
Zuma Rock is a large monolith, an igneous intrusion composed of gabbro and granodiorite, that is located in Niger State, Nigeria. It rises spectacularly immediately west of Nigeria's capital Abuja, along the main road from Abuja to Kaduna off Madala, and is sometimes referred to as the "Gateway to Abuja from Suleja". Zuma Rock rises 725 metres (2,379 ft) above its surroundings.

Zuma is depicted on the 100 naira note. It was used for a defensive retreat by the Gbagyi people against invading neighbouring tribes during intertribal warring.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zuma_Rock
Name: Abuja National Mosque
Location: Abuja, Nigeria
The Abuja National Mosque, also known as the Nigerian National Mosque, is the national mosque of Nigeria, a country with a substantial Muslim population. The mosque was built in 1984 and is open to the non-Muslim public, except during congregational prayers. Ustadz Musa Mohammed is the chief imam.

The mosque is located in the capital city, Abuja, and is situated on Independence Avenue, across from the National Christian Centre. It includes a library and a conference room.

The complex includes a conference centre capable of serving five hundred persons, the office for the Islamic Centre, and residential facilities for the imam and muezzin. During construction, the general contractors were Lodigiani Nigeria Ltd., while design consultancy was provided by AIM Consultants Ltd.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abuja_National_Mosque
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN NIGERIA / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

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COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO NIGERIA.
FACTS:
Official Languages: English
Currency: Nigeria Naira (NGN)
Time zone: WAT (UTC+1)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +234
Local / up-to-date weather in Lagos (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Nigeria travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Nigeria, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO NIGERIA.

Nigeria’s currency is naira (symbol: ₦, ISO 4217 code: NGN). Banknotes circulate in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500 and 1,000 and inflation typically runs in double figures.

It is advised to cash all your naira back into another currency at the airport before you leave Nigeria. The rate is irrelevant, as the naira is not worth that much outside Nigeria. Naira bills/coins may be of interest to currency collectors, but other than that, they will be nothing more than colourful souvenirs of your trip. Banks will change foreign currency to naira, but usually not the other way around, even though you are a foreigner. You would therefore need to use the Bureaux de Change at the International terminal or the new Domestic terminal or street vendors to get foreign currency should you end up with unused naira at the end of your trip. A safe place to change in Victoria Island is in the tourist market of Eko Hotel in Victoria Island.

If the Bureaux de Change at the airport are closed, the car park outside the International terminal is full of street vendors only willing to change money from any major currency. When dealing with these street vendors, keep the money you are buying fully visible until the deal is finished (i.e. don’t put into handbag and later discover it is wrong and then try and bargain) and count carefully with them, as they tend to try and short-change you with a note or two, especially when you change foreign currency into naira (which is a thick bundle of small notes), but with necessary vigilance are generally fine. Street vendors are also plentiful at the main land borders to change naira into CFA francs (XOF (Benin and Niger side) or XAF (Cameroon side)) if need be. XOF and XAF are freely and easily convertible to and from euros at a rate of 655.957 (sometimes with a small commission) when you are in the French countries.

Changing large bills of US dollars or euros will give a better rate with professional money changers, such as on the currency exchange market near Lagos Domestic Airport. This is a walled enclosure with a large number of money changers, which is primarily used by local nationals.

If you have a Visa card, you can withdraw money from Standard Chartered Bank ATMs in Lagos – Aromire St, off Adeniyi Jones, Ikeja & Ajose Adeogun St in Victoria Island Branch, Abuja and Port Harcourt (in Naira) and ATMs of some other banks with “Visa” stickers on them, like GT Bank, UBA, and Zenith. This will save you a lot of stress carrying large sums of money and it is secured.

On Abuja and Lagos International Airport money can be withdrawn from ATMs. On Lagos International there are several ATMs, several may not function at all times. On Lagos Domestic Terminal there is also a functioning ATM in the domestic terminal on the 1st floor. Usually this a quiet ATM which also is very private and secure.

MasterCard/Maestro users can also withdraw money from ATMs at several branches of Zenith Bank and GT Bank. Some ATMs of Ecobank, First Bank and Intercontinental Bank also allow for MasterCard/Maestro cards. Look for the red ATM sign outside, or ask the on-site security officer at any branch. Also look for Ecobank, they have a branch within the premises of the Murtala Muhammed International Airport. Visa is however a safer option if you are visiting the French countries around Nigeria as well, as MasterCard/Maestro is close to useless in these countries.

If you do use an ATM, be aware of the risks of card cloning. This a problem with the airport ATMs which do not have a security guard watching over them. Check your statements regularly after using your card and alert your bank to any suspicious activity.

Nigeria is on an active drive to become a cash-less society, and as such, more and more hotels, restaurant and shops (all the bigger ones at least) accept major credit cards (Visa being the preferred one – but ask first, there is both “local Visa” and “international Visa” – and MasterCard). Diners Club and Amex are almost universally useless in Nigeria. When paying by card, take the usual precautions (watch how they swipe, don’t let the card out of your sight, etc.)

BY CAR:

Driving in Nigeria (especially Lagos) is somewhat unique, vaguely resembling driving in Cairo. If mastered, you should however be able to cope in most other countries. While driving in Abuja is relatively decent due to regularly maintained roads, it still doesn’t compare with roads in more developed countries.

Many roads are bad. Expect potholes of every size, and that, except on the highway, people will drive on the wrong side to avoid potholes or other bad patches of road. Sometimes entire roads are non-existent, so be prepared for anything.

Grass or branches on the road means there is a broken down vehicle ahead of you, be careful.

If you are white, get used to Nigerians shouting at you as you pass by. It will be something like “Oyibo”, “Oniocha””MBakara”, “Bature” or “white man”. It all means the same, they are just telling you to smile as you pass.

Self-driving for short-term visitors unfamiliar with the roads, especially in Lagos, is by no means advisable and could actually be quite foolish, perhaps even dangerous. You could easily wander into an area or a road block set by local gangs. If you choose to rent a car, it will come with a driver familiar with the area and style of driving, which is the easier and safer option.

Police may try to take fiscal advantage of you as a foreigner. If you wish to drive yourself it is advisable to stick to the rules, as you will be an easy target for police officers to “fine”. These are not real fines, they are payable directly to the officer in cash – without a ticket or a receipt. Even if you obey the traffic rules, police will find some petty reason – like not indicating your intention to drive straight. Should you be pulled over, do not give your license, as you will then lose all bargaining power when negotiating the “fine”, which could easily be a maximum of all the visible cash you have on you at the time. Rather, carry a copy of the license and hand that over, or show your license through your window. Also, do not let the police get into your car. They are not really dangerous, but it could get expensive and certainly annoying. However, if you just don’t pay and remain calm, it only costs time. They have no real power over you.

Especially over weekends and festive times, it is common practice for police, especially in the richer areas of Lagos, to flag you down and wish you happy weekend/holiday/Christmas/Easter/sunny weather/trip to work. In this case, you did nothing wrong and they do not intend to “fine” you, but are rather asking for a tip. If you insistently yet politely refuse to give something, they will eventually let you go. Just wish them a nice weekend/holiday/etc. too.

If you work for a big company in Nigeria, you will usually have a company driver to drive you around, thereby avoiding the abovementioned problems to a large extent. He can arrange a local driver’s license for you should the need arise without a driving test or proof of foreign license.

Nigeria is not part of the most standard international Road Traffic Convention and as such will require a special International Driving Permit (valid only for driving in Nigeria, Somalia and Iraq) (if you do not want to get the Nigerian license), not the normal one applicable to almost all other countries in the world.

The last Saturday of the month is Sanitation Day in Lagos and Kano, when the locals clean their premises. While it is not illegal to be out on the street between 7:00AM-10:00AM, due to the higher than usual presence of police officers and road check points, most Nigerians choose to restrict their movements until after 10:00AM. Should you be caught at this time, you may be taken away by the police to perform some “public sanitation” duty, like mowing lawns, etc.

BY TRAIN:

After having being abandoned for a long time, rehabilitation of rail services in Nigeria are finally in full swing. Helped by Chinese investment several new lines are expected to open in the next few years while older lines are renovated. While still much slower than flying, it is now possible to travel across the country by train. Nigeria Railway Corporation is the sole operator, this might however change as the government mulls liberalization of the railway sector.

Lagos and Abuja now have almost daily connections with cities in the interior of Nigeria such as Ilorin, Minna and Kaduna, with Lagos even offering a once-weekly sleeper service all the way north to Kano.

BY PLANE:

Arik and Aero Contractors have scheduled domestic connections with modern aircraft and reasonable prices. Their websites are user-friendly and well updated. In Lagos, the two domestic terminals, while next to each other, are about 4-5 km (of road which would not be wise to walk if you don’t know the place) from the international terminal, and you would therefore need a taxi to get from the one to the other, should you wish to transfer from an international flight to a domestic one.

EAT:

There are many types of traditional cuisine to enjoy. For example: afang soup, okra soup, owo soup and starch in the Niger Delta, plantain (fried, boiled, roasted), pepper soup, amala, eba, efo, pounded yam (iyan – Yoruba for “pounded yam” pronounce ” ee-yarn” ), jollof rice, ground nut soup, ogbono soup, isi ewu (goat’s head stew), egusi soup, suya (kebab), moin moin, ewedu, gbegiri soup (beans soup), edikangikong, ground-rice, puff-puff, chin chin, ikokore, owerri soup (ofe owerri), which is the most expensive African soup in Nigeria. Not to forget 404 pepper soup – it will make you act like “Oliver Twist.” You must realise that 404 means “dog meat.” and yes, it can only be found in certain parts of the country because in the west it is seen as barbaric.

For the less adventurous traveller, there are loads of “foreign” restaurants in Lagos, e.g. Sky Bar and the grill at Eco Hotel, Churasco’s, Lagoon and Fusion all three next to each other (all-you-can-eat Brazilian grill, Indian and Sushi respectively) with a nice view of the lagoon, Piccolo Mondo, Manuella’s Residence (great Italian Pizza from Manuella the Italian lady), Bungalow (close to Coschari’s BMW in VI) – good sports bar, grill and Sushi, great Sunday buffet at Radisson Blu. Chocolate Royal is a nice family restaurant with excellent ice cream selection (including ice cream cakes) and pastries in VI. Inside Chocolate Royal is an Oriental restaurant called Métisse. Bottles in VI is a grill and Mexican restaurant. And there are loads more flavours from every corner of the world. Just Google and ask taxi to take you there. Outside Lagos and to a lesser extent Abuja, Western food will tend to disappear, with “Jollof Rice and fried chicken” being a “safe” option if you are not adventurous. Fried plantains, shawarma and chicken suya are some of the best options if you are craving some street food. These are often sold by locals at the roadside.

Foreign restaurants are expensive and you can prepare for a bill of at least $50 to $75 or even $100 per head for main course. If this is too much, try the Syrian Club in Ikoyi (turn North – away from the water) at the Mobil filling station in Awolowo Road (the night club street) in Ikoyi, continue a few blocks and on your left you will see the Syrian mosque, turn in the gate just after the mosque and the Syrian Club will be on your right on the inside of the premises with nice Lebanese/Syrian flair at very affordable (for Lagos) prices in an outdoor setting.

If you are a new expat living in Lagos, do yourself a favour and acquaint yourself early on with the following more expensive, foreign owned, but well worth-it, smaller specialist shops in VI selling all the delicacies and nice imported red meats that foreigners long for in and that Shoprite, Park and Shop, Next, and Goodie’s (the main supermarkets) may not stock: 1. Deli’s on Akin Adesola (the main road leading to Bar Beach), 2. L’Epicérie across the road from Mega Plaza and 3. La Pointe on Kofo Abayomi Street (close to the Brazilian Embassy/Consulate) and not easy to spot. Knowing these places will significantly improve your coping ability in the first couple of months.

DRINK:

  • Nigeria is one of the places where Guinness is brewed outside of Ireland. And they do it pretty well, although it’s not the same product. The Guinness brand (with logo and copyrights where they should be) is also used to brew both an alcohol-free malt version of the black stuff, and an extra strong (about 7.5%) version of Guinness in Kenya (in the case of the latter) and Tanzania (in the case of the former).
  • Beer is actually big business in Nigeria, although the move toward evangelism and Islamic law is making its mark. Lagos is relatively unaffected due to its cosmopolitan nature. Heineken, Star, Harp, Gulder and other international beers are available.
  • Malt beverages (non alcoholic) are very common in Nigeria.
  • The other cheap drink of choice is gin, which is locally made. Some locals will swear to it making their step uncle’s dog blind, though, so be careful.

Other drinks to consider include: palm wine, wine, zobo (red soft drink, is a tea of dried roselle flowers), kunun, kai kai (also called ogogoro).

The northern states have implemented Sharia (Islamic) law, which means that alcohol is prohibited. Ironically, the only places where you can drink a beer in these states are the police staff bars and the army barracks, because these are institutions under federal law. Beer is available in Kano, in restaurants managed by foreign or Christian people, Chinese restaurants, and/or French cafes.

For a real night out, go to the Sabongari area of the old town. Plenty of bars around that stay open till very late. Many do decent food as well. Sabongari is also the place to buy alcoholic drinks and there are plenty stores open late into the night. Some hotels in Kano are “dry”, however in Tahir Guest Palace the staff will be quite happy to buy you a few bottles of beer for you in your room (all rooms have large fridges).

  • The Transcorp Hilton in Abuja is 5-star and a top ranked hotel in Nigeria. It’s comparable to nice hotels in other developing countries. However, if you decide to visit the hotel bar, be warned that the single women who seem so interested in you are almost certainly “working.” This is true of many hotels that cater to international clients.
  • In Port Harcourt, the Meridian is quite decent. It’s a tad bit expensive but your money’s worth is guaranteed.
  • In Lagos, the Sheraton Hotel and the Kuramo Lodge on Victoria Island are ranked 4 star. You can also try the Eko Hotel & Suites adjacent to Kuramo Lodge. It’s definitely a favourite for tourists and foreigners.
  • In Kano, you can have an aircond room in Tahir Guest Palace, Prince hotel, or one of many small hotels. The Green Palace Hotel in Kano is awesome. It is roomy, not as isolated as the Prince, and just has a pleasant ambience.
**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Nigeria
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Lekki Conservation Centre
Location: Lekki, Nigeria
The reserve area which covers a land area of 78 hectare is located on Lekki Peninsula, next to the Lekki Lagoon, and near the Lagos Lagoon. It protects the wetlands of the Lekki peninsula which consists of swamp and savannah habitats. Approaching the reserve, there's a boulevard of coconut trees which leads to a well laid out car and Visitors Park. It is endowed with an abundance of plant and animal life. Its huge tract of wetlands is set aside for wildlife viewing. Raised walkways enable viewing of animals like monkeys, crocodiles, snakes and various birds. There is also a conservation center and a library.

The wetlands are managed by the Nigerian Conservation Foundation, and it now includes a figure-of-eight system of footpaths, with hiking trails and stepping stones to cross waterways. A trail boardwalk was constructed in 1992 to enrich tourists view of the vast resources of the nature reserve which is encapsulated on a mangrove terrain. Side attractions along the trail includes swamp outlook, bird hide, rest stops and the tree house. The 1.8km nature trail behind the foremost main buildings is connected by two wooden tracks.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lekki_Conservation_Centre
Name: Zuma Rock
Location: Niger State, Nigeria
Zuma Rock is a large monolith, an igneous intrusion composed of gabbro and granodiorite, that is located in Niger State, Nigeria. It rises spectacularly immediately west of Nigeria's capital Abuja, along the main road from Abuja to Kaduna off Madala, and is sometimes referred to as the "Gateway to Abuja from Suleja". Zuma Rock rises 725 metres (2,379 ft) above its surroundings.

Zuma is depicted on the 100 naira note. It was used for a defensive retreat by the Gbagyi people against invading neighbouring tribes during intertribal warring.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zuma_Rock
Name: Abuja National Mosque
Location: Abuja, Nigeria
The Abuja National Mosque, also known as the Nigerian National Mosque, is the national mosque of Nigeria, a country with a substantial Muslim population. The mosque was built in 1984 and is open to the non-Muslim public, except during congregational prayers. Ustadz Musa Mohammed is the chief imam.

The mosque is located in the capital city, Abuja, and is situated on Independence Avenue, across from the National Christian Centre. It includes a library and a conference room.

The complex includes a conference centre capable of serving five hundred persons, the office for the Islamic Centre, and residential facilities for the imam and muezzin. During construction, the general contractors were Lodigiani Nigeria Ltd., while design consultancy was provided by AIM Consultants Ltd.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abuja_National_Mosque
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
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...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

Global Immigration Leader, Big 4

“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

Internal stakeholder, Big 4

“Manny is a big reason why the move from (external provider) to the UK firm’s passport and visa provision has been so smooth. He’s an extremely likeable honest hard working guy who takes his role very seriously. We’re very fortunate to have him leading our dedicated team”

External client, Private practice

“Most of my contact was with Manpreet Singh Johal. He did the best job someone could imagine. Extraordinary service from his side.”

Team member, Big 4

“Working on two priority accounts is naturally pressurised especially where he has also been responsible for billing on both accounts; yet Manny delivers every time and this I believe is an exceptional quality.”

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