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TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Preikestolen
Location: Rogaland, Norway
Preikestolen is a tourist attraction in the municipality of Forsand in Rogaland county, Norway. Preikestolen is a steep cliff which rises 604 metres (1,982 ft) above the Lysefjorden. Atop the cliff, there is an almost flat top of approximately 25 by 25 metres (82 ft × 82 ft). It sits on the north side of the fjord, opposite the Kjerag plateau, located on the south side.

Tourism at the site has been increasing in the early 21st century, with between 150,000 and 200,000 visitors in 2012, making it one of the most visited natural tourist attractions in Norway. BASE jumpers often leap from the cliff. Due to its increased popularity, there is currently a project under way to improve the path to the site, which is only accessible via a 3.8-kilometre (2.4 mi) long hike.

The cliff was formed during the ice age, approximately 10,000 years ago, when the edges of the glacier reached the cliff. The water from the glacier froze in the crevices of the mountain and eventually broke off large, angular blocks, which were later carried away with the glacier. This is the cause of the angular shape of the plateau.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preikestolen
Name: Geiranger Fjord
Location: Sunnmøre, Norway
The Geiranger Fjord is a fjord in the Sunnmøre region of Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It is a 15km long branch off the Sunnylvsfjorden, which is a branch off the Storfjorden (Great Fjord). The small village of Geiranger is located at the end of the fjord where the Geirangelva river empties into it.

The fjord is one of Norway's most visited tourist sites. In 2005, it was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, jointly with the Nærøyfjorden, although this status is now threatened by the disputed plans to build power lines across the fjord. A car ferry, which doubles as a sightseeing trip, is operated by Fjord1 Nordvestlandske. It runs lengthwise along the fjord between the small towns of Geiranger and Hellesylt.

Along the fjord's sides there lie a number of now-abandoned farms. Some restoration has been made by the Storfjordens venner association. The most commonly visited among these are Skageflå, Knivsflå, and Blomberg. Skageflå may also be reached on foot from Geiranger, while the others require a boat excursion. The fjord is also host to several impressive waterfalls such as Seven Sisters Falls.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geirangerfjord
Name: Lofoten
Location: Nordland, Norway
Lofoten is an archipelago and a traditional district in the county of Nordland, Norway. It is known for a distinctive scenery with dramatic mountains and peaks, open sea and sheltered bays, beaches and untouched lands. Though lying within the Arctic Circle, the archipelago experiences one of the world's largest elevated temperature anomalies relative to its high latitude.

Lofoten offers many rock climbing and mountaineering opportunities. It has 24 hours of daylight in the summer and has Alpine-style ridges, summits and glaciers, but at a height of less than 1,200 metres. The main centre for rock climbing is Henningsvær on Austvågøya.

The main areas for mountaineering and climbing are on Austvågøy and Moskenesøya. Moskenesøya features remote and serious mountaineering whereas Austvågøy is very popular area for rock climbing. For more information, see the walking guide by Dyer and the rock climbing guidebook by Craggs and Enevold. Lofoten has one of the worlds most interesting football pitches on an island as used in Windows start up screens. There is also a well marked cycling route that goes from Å in the south and continues past Fiskebøl in the north.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lofoten
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
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COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO NORWAY.
FACTS:
Official Languages: Norwegian / Sami
Currency: Norway Kroner (NOK)
Time zone: CET (UTC+1) / CEST (UTC+2)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +47
Local / up-to-date weather in Oslo (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Norway travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Norway, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO NORWAY.

Norwegian currency is the Norwegian krone (crown, plural: kroner) (ISO code: NOK), sometimes abbreviated kr or kr., but often just the amount is shown on price tags. A 1/100th krone is called øre. Be careful when crossing borders to differentiate the Norwegian krone (NOK) from the Swedish (SEK) or Danish (DKK) krone.

Euros are generally not accepted in shops, except in some airports, international transport (flights, ferries), and a small number of business targeting tourists.

Coins come in 1, 5, 10, and 20 kr. Paper notes come in 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1,000 kr. While price tags still include øre, for instance 9.99 kr, there are no coins smaller than 1 kroner so prices are rounded. As of 2018, Norway is in the process of renewing its banknote design. New 100 and 200 kr designs were launched in May 2017, and the old designs ceased to be legal tender one year after. And new 50 and 500 kr designs launched in October 2018, and it will likewise be possible to use the old 50 and 500 kr banknotes for one year after that (until October 2019). Finally, new 1000 kr notes will be launched in late 2019, and the old notes will be demonetized one year after.

BY PLANE:

As Norway’s craggy coastline and mountainous terrain slow down overland traffic, domestic flights are a convenient option, especially in northern Norway where towns and cities are fewer and further between. Unfortunately, it is also in these areas where tickets can be most expensive. Planes between the small airports are small, and they generally have several intermediate stops along the route to embark and disembark passengers.

Flights in southern Norway are cheaper than in northern Norway, and even though this area has better roads and rail, planes are generally faster than taking the train or bus. There are however no air routes between the cities within 200 km from Oslo, use the train or bus for this kind of travel.

The largest operators are SAS, Norwegian and Widerøe.

If you plan to fly to the many smaller towns in Northern or Western Norway you should consider Widerøe’s Explore Norway ticket (unlimited air travel for 14 days in summer for less than a full price return ticket).

BY TRAIN:

The state-owned railway firm Vy (formerly Norwegian State Railways or NSB) operates all railway lines except the airport express train Flytoget. Norway’s rail network basically connects Oslo to other major cities, there are no rail lines North to South in West Norway between Stavanger and Trondheim, and there are no rail lines North-South in North Norway north of Bodø. These main lines run several times a day:

  • Oslo–Kristiansand–Stavanger (Sørlandsbanen, runs inland from Drammen to Kristiansand, connections to Arendal)
  • Oslo–Skien (serving coastal towns southwest of Oslo)
  • Oslo–Bergen (Bergensbanen – Bergen line, across the mountains via Finse, connections to Flåm)
  • Oslo–Trondheim (Dovrebanen, through Lillehammer, connections to Åndalsnes at Dombås)
  • Oslo–Sarpsborg–Halden
  • Hamar–Røros–Trondheim (Røros line)
    Trondheim–Bodø (Nordlandsbanen – Nordland line, through
  • Trondheim airport, connections to Sweden), Norway’s longest, crosses the arctic circle

Trains are generally well-maintained and comfortable.

You can buy a Norwegian Rail Pass or the equivalent InterRail One Country Pass to travel cheap by train through Norway. If your itinerary is fixed and you don’t have too many destinations, it might be cheaper to buy ‘Minipris’ tickets online. If you book well in advance, you can get one-way tickets for as little as 199 kr. When buying online, you can choose ticket delivery at the station or at the train, the latter means you only need to know your seat number, the train steward has your ticket. Their website sometimes does not work for people outside of Norway. In that case you can call their call centre, but be sure to mention that you tried on the website first. Phone reservations normally incur a 50-kr fee per train ticket bought. Vy has a phone app for buying tickets, but as of 2016, a Norwegian cell phone number is needed for it.

For long-distance trains and night trains, seat reservation is mandatory, but usually can be done on short notice, e.g., at a train station, since the trains are rarely fully booked. Generally, the trains are most crowded at the beginning and end of the weekend, i.e. Friday and Sunday evening. Shortly before and at the end of major holidays like Christmas/New Year and Easter, trains are usually very busy. If you try booking for these days at a late time, you may find all the cheap tickets sold out. Furthermore, the seat you reserve may be among the least desirable, that is, facing backwards, without recline, and facing towards and sharing the legroom with other passengers.

Night trains operate Oslo – Bergen, Kristiansand, Bergen, Trondheim and Bodø. With a regular ticket, you will get an ordinary seat, blanket and earplugs. Sleeping compartments are available for an extra of 750 kr. If you choose to order sleeping compartment, you pay for the compartment, not the bed: 2 people, same price. This also means that you will never have a stranger in your compartment.

For 90 kr you can upgrade any regular train ticket to NSB Komfort, the equivalent of first class, which means a little more room for your legs, free coffee, papers and a power socket. Usually the NSB Komfort coach is either the first or the last coach in the train, resulting in much less through traffic and a quieter environment.

The regular night train seats have a power plug, too. In some trains there is even free Internet access via Wi-Fi; one just needs to register (giving any 8-digit number as ‘phone number’).

Unlike much of Continental Europe, Norway does not have a high speed rail system, except for the route between Oslo and its airport. Attempts at implementing high speed trains are underway, but have failed so far. Therefore, a journey between the two largest cities, Bergen and Oslo, takes as much as six and a half to seven and a half hours.

In eastern Norway, where cities are closer together, there are several people who make a daily commute, and hence many of these cities have more frequent train service with hourly departures much of the day. This includes the cities in the counties of Østfold, Vestfold, Gjøvik, Hamar and Lillehammer. In general, these trains do not have seating reservations available, but it is still possible to upgrade to NSB Komfort.

If you get even closer to Oslo, there are local trains which may have departures as often as every 30 minutes. Local trains never have seating reservations, nor do they have a first class section. Local trains also operate between Bergen and Voss (sometimes to Myrdal), Stavanger and Egersund and around Trondheim.

BY BOAT:

Car ferries are an integral part of the road network in coastal and fjord regions. The road in principle continues onto the ferry such that for instance Fodnes-Mannheller ferry is part of national route 5. Prices and time vary with the length of the crossing and amount of traffic, call 177 for more information or check nearby camping sites for information booklets and timetables. Prices on public roads ferries are set by the Department of roads. Small cars (as of 2018) are up 6.0 meters, longer vehicles must pay a considerably higher price and this often affects campervans.

Ferries often have information about other ferries in the region and other ferries along the same road. On the main roads ferries are frequent during daytime, typically every half hour. Reservations are usually not needed, drive to the ferry quay and wait in line until the ferry docks. Car ferries also take foot passengers. On main roads tourists typically do not have to worry about timetables as there are frequent departures. Most ferries do not run after midnight or they run only every second hour on main crossings. Norwegians refer to car ferries as “ferje” or “ferge”. Vessels that only take foot passengers are refered to as “båt” (boat). To avoid confusion, visitors should use the term ferry only for car ferries.

Stretches with lots of ferries are desirable when bicycling, as the ferries are cheap for bicyclists and offer an often well-deserved break with a great view. Except for some of the shortest crossings (10 min), ferries typically have cafeterias serving coffee, cold beverages, sandwiches and some hot food. Due to numerous deep fjords and islands, driving in West Norway and Northern Norway as a rule (with few exceptions) involves ferries. Although car ferries are very reliable and operate with spare capacity, tourists should allow plenty of time on stretches including ferries. Ferries on unusually long crossings (several hours) or ferries crossing open stretches of sea are more frequently delayed or cancelled.

In regions with lots of fjords and islands, particularly along all the coast from Stavanger to Tromsø, an extensive network of catamaran express passenger boats (“hurtigbåt”) shuttle between towns and cities, and connect islands otherwise accessible only with difficulty. There is no general network of boats connecting every village along fjords and coast, transfer by bus or car to nearest port may be needed. These vessels are also not called ferries. Service and prices are comparable with trains. Check in advance if you want to bring a bicycle. There are also some passengers in the inner part of Oslofjord.

One option particularly popular with tourists is the Hurtigruten coastal steamers that hop along the coastline from Bergen all the way to Kirkenes, taking five and a half days for the whole journey. Cabins are expensive and mandatory for multi-day journeys, but deck fares are more reasonable and there’s even a 50% off discount with Inter Rail. Prices are summed up for all chargeable elements like persons, fuel charge (approx. 1/30 of a person), bike (approx. 1/20 of a person), car, cabin (approx. 125% of a person). Reservations are recommended for cabins and cars; on deck is usually enough space for persons and bikes.

Lakes do in general not have public transport by boat, here are however a handful of important exceptions. There is one car ferry crossing the very long Randsfjorden lake. Skibladner, a 150-year-old steam boat, allows tourists to cross lake Mjøsa (at Gjøvik and Hamar) the old way. Telemark canal, Norway’s only proper canal, takes visitors from the coast and deep inland along charming lakes and impressive locks.

BY BUS:

An extensive range of express buses connect cities all over Norway and even most national parks. NOR-WAY Bussekspress, Timekspressen and Boreal Transport are the biggest operators. Nettbuss also runs some express routes.

Lavprisekspressen offer cheap tickets for Oslo—Trondheim (via Røros and via the Dovre mountain range), Oslo—Kristiansand—Stavanger and back. If you’re lucky, you can get a ticket for as little as 49kr, but usually the tickets go from 199kr to 299kr. The double decker buses are clean and modern with free Wi-Fi internet, coffee and tea.

Bus schedules and frequencies vary greatly, and seating may be limited, so plan ahead. For more information check each operator’s website or try the extensive connection search Rutebok.no – available in English, Norwegian and German. Some mountain passes are closed all winter, and buses covering these typically run May—September only.

In the north of Norway north of Trondheim, there are no private express buses. Instead the provinces organise also long-distance buses, which also stop at local stops, having sparse schedules. There is no bus Trondheim–Bodø, instead the stretch is served by train (Nordlandsbanen line). There are for example comfortable buses Bodø–Narvik, Narvik–Tromsø, Tromsø–Alta and Alta-Kirkenes (they are daytime buses and accommodation is needed at Narvik, Tromsø and Alta if going all that way).

BY TAXI:

Travelling with cab in Norway can be very expensive, and in most cities it is not necessary as bus, tram and train (or even walking) are easier. Taxis are generally safe as long as you choose a licensed taxi (with a white taxi sign on the roof). In villages there may be no or only one taxi car, so visitors should be prepared to book in advance.

  • RingTaxi, 02393 (in country only). Conveys taxis throughout the country. The service, which costs 18kr per call is reachable within Norway only.
  • In some cities, like Oslo, Trondheim and Kristiansand are several local taxi companies.
  • mivay. By the Taxi app you will easily get in touch with the nearest taxi service center in densely populated areas.

BY CAR OF MOTORCYCLE

Norway has right hand traffic, like the rest of mainland Europe. Norwegian roads have varying quality, but all public roads have asphalt. Most roads are two-lane undivided, there is a limited motorway network around Oslo. General speed limit is 80km/h and speed is often slower due to road conditions. Driving in winter requires special equipment, snow and ice experience is highly recommended prior to a winter trip. Some of the scenic mountain passes, notably at Geiranger, Trollstigen and Nordkapp (North Cape), are closed during winter.

Driving is generally easy as traffic is calm, and most drivers are disciplined and law abiding, although moderate speeding is common on highways. However, some city centres (such as Bergen and Oslo) may be confusing to navigate for the first time visitor due to many one-way streets. Traffic is generally light except for city centres and a handful of stretches on main roads (notably E18 near Oslo). Near or inside Oslo the E18, E6 and ring roads can get congested during morning and afternoon rush, as well as during weekend rush (Friday afternoon) out of Oslo. Gas is expensive, starting at around 16.50 kr per litre (July 2018). Manual transmission is regarded as standard in Norway and is found in most private cars. Renting a car is very expensive, but can be essential for easy access to some of the more rural areas, although most areas have a good reliable bus service.

BY BICYCLE:

While the bicycle seat may be one of the best ways to experience the landscapes of Norway, it can be a gruelling experience for those who are unfit. There are few bicycle paths, and most of the time cyclists have to share narrow roads with heavy transport. Attitudes to cyclists vary. While some drivers show respect, slowing down and giving cyclists a wide berth, others show hostility, driving far too close and at far too high a speed, when passing. Cycling, as a sport, is becoming increasingly popular in Norway, especially since the success of Norwegian cyclists like Thor Hushovd. Attitudes to bicycle tourists vary, but in general is positive. Hostels and camping sites are generally a good place to meet people with similar interests. Norwegians themselves prefer to ride on well equipped, often expensive, bicycles. Good bicycle shops can be found in most cities.

You will find quite a number of travel diaries online. Only few designated cycle paths exist, mostly in the big cities, and they are not fully interconnected. Except for densely populated areas, they can mostly be ignored. While speed limits are relatively low and the vast majority of drivers are responsible and patient, Norway also has its share of speeders and road hogs. At places where a highway is built, the old road is often re-designated as a cycle route.

It is important for cyclists to be seen. The use of highly reflective safety vests, along with flashing lights on the bicycle, is encouraged to help prevent accidents.

In most of Norway, cycling can be physically challenging, due to steep climbs and strong winds. Your equipment should be lightweight and aerodynamic. You will need a wide range of gears: a ratio of 39-27 for a strong cyclist without luggage or even 22-32 for a normal cyclist with luggage is necessary on many slopes. Your brakes should be of high quality and you’ll need spare brake pads when doing a trip of more than a few days. Lights are necessary because of the many tunnels. Because of the winds, it is advisable to avoid wide panniers and loose fitting clothes. A lightweight recumbent should be considered as a serious option for those experienced with this type of bicycle, especially when cycling south to north.

The roads are generally paved well, although gravel roads are sometimes unavoidable. As long as you do not go off-road, you will not need suspension or grooved tyres.

Because of the long distances and numerous hills, bicycle tourists are advised to plan well and be prepared to use public transport for the less interesting or difficult stretches. Particularly in western and northern Norway, passenger boats (including longer tourist ferries) can sometimes be used to avoid tunnels, mountain passes or less interesting stretches.

Ferries take bikes for free or a minimal charge. On trains you have to pay a fare. Some buses do not allow bikes, but in all other cases will only be transported if there is enough space (no fare or children’s fare). The Norwegian Cyclist Association offers information.

It is legal in Norway (and Finland and Sweden) to put up a tent anywhere for one night. This must not be too near someone’s home, or on other unsuitable places. This is particularly suitable for bicyclists, who can roll the bike into the forest at a suitable place. It is more troublesome for car drivers to do this, as it is hard to find a good parking place near a suitable tent place (car parking is not permitted on private roads, e.g. in the forest).

Tunnels:

Special attention should be given to tunnels, as many of them are forbidden for cyclists, as are a few roads. Some long and narrow tunnels are not recommended for bikes, even if allowed. An online map of tunnels can be found. The tourist information also has a map of those forbidden routes. When renting a bike, you can consult the person who rents you the bike concerning the track you want to take. In many cases, signposts indicate the route for cyclists and pedestrians around forbidden roads or tunnels. Some of the high speed tunnels have bus stops a short distance from the entrance where you can board special buses equipped with bike racks to transport you through the tunnel. On main roads, buses usually run frequently. Some sub-sea tunnels are in addition really steep. If you do enter a tunnel on bike, use lights and safety reflectors (such as reflector jackets or vests). Norwegian drivers do not slow down in tunnels.

Warning: Do not underestimate the number and length of tunnels, particularly in western Norway. Norway’s roads have well over 1,000 tunnels. On the E16 between Bergen and Lærdal for instance, 30–50% of the road is in tunnel. Frequently, tunnels replace an older road that remains open for bicycles and pedestrians in summer or for local traffic all year. Ask locals or read the map carefully to find your way.

EAT:

Cuisine:

While Norwegian eating habits have become more cosmopolitan in the last decades, traditional Norwegian “farm” food is still widely eaten, made by whatever can grow in the northern climate, be stored for a year until new crops come out, and contain enough energy for you to do hard work. Regional variances in traditional food are huge and hence, and what is thought to be “typical traditional” for one Norwegian might be totally unknown to another. Typical examples are variations of yeasted and unyeasted bread and other forms of bakery, porridges, soups, inventive uses of potato, salted and smoked meat, and fresh, salted or smoked fish. Dried cod (tørrfisk) and salted cod (klippfisk) are staples of coastal communities in the west and north and can be seen drying on outside racks in spring and summer. The national dish of Norway is fårikål, a stewed casserole of lamb’s meat and cabbage. Other specialities include lutefisk (lyefish) made from dry/salted fish processed in lye, and potato dumplings served with salt meat (raspeball) or mixed with fish (blandeball). Sheep’s head (smalahove) and dried mutton ribs (pinnekjøtt) are traditionally served before or during Christmas in Western Norway.

Finer traditional food is usually based on game or fresh fish. Steak, medallions and meat balls from game, deer, reindeer and elk are highly appreciated foods with international reputation, so are fresh, smoked and fermented salmon varieties as well as a host of other fish products. Traditional pastries like lukket valnøtt (marzipan-covered whipped cream cake) are other original contributions to international cuisine. Cheese of various types is common, but one particularly Norwegian favourite is brun geitost (brown goat-cheese), a mild sweet cheese which bears a remarkable similarity to smooth peanut butter in colour, texture and taste.

Today, Norwegians use plenty of sliced bread for almost any meal except dinner, whereas recipes for hot meals will be taken from almost anywhere in the world, including of course the traditional kitchen, but seldom the most extreme examples. Lunch usually consists of some bread and snacks instead of a warm dish but this is then compensated by eating well at dinner time. Most Norwegians don’t go out for lunch, instead have a quick meal in the workplace.

Norway maintains high import tariffs for food; especially meat, dairy products, and alcoholic beverages. Norwegians who live near Sweden or Finland usually cross the border to buy these products.

Norwegians are also known for buying a lot of frozen pizzas at modest prices in any grocery store.

Places to eat:

Fast food meals start from 50 kr and sit-down meals in a decent restaurant nearly always topping 200 kr or more for a main course. Even a take-away sandwich and a coffee at a gas station may cost you up to 70 kr. One way to cut costs is self-catering, as youth hostels and guesthouses often have kitchens for their guests. Supermarkets and grocery stores are not hard to find, even in the smallest village there is usually more than one grocery store. The largest chains are Coop, REMA 1000, Kiwi and Joker. Breakfast is often hearty and buffet-style, so pigging out at breakfast and skipping lunch is also an option. Buy/bring a lunchbox before attending breakfast, as most of the bigger hotels will allow you to fill it up for free from the breakfast buffet for eating later in the day.

For a cheap quick snack Norwegian-style, look no further than the nearest grill or convenience store, which will dish up a sausage (pølse) or hot dog (grillpølse) in either a hot dog bun (brød) or wrapped in a flat potato bread (lompe) for around 20-30 kr. However prices can soar as high as 50 kr if you buy at the right (read wrong) places. In addition to ketchup and mustard, optional toppings include pickled cucumber (sylteagurk), fried onion bits (stekt løk) and shrimp salad (rekesalat). To get the most for your money, order a (kebab i pita) which is lamb meat roasted on a spit then fried when you order, served together with vegetables in a pita bread. This tastes great, is extremely filling and can be found for as little as 40 kr in central Oslo. Outside, you will have to stick with your grillpølse.

Vegetarians:

Some Norwegian cuisine restaurants have vegetarian meals on the menu, but others will make something if asked, with varying success. Some of the few chains of stores/restaurants where you will always have a vegetarian option is Peppes Pizza, Domino’s, Pizzabakeren, Subway and Esso/On the run (spinach panini).

Allergies and diets:

If you have allergies like lactose intolerance and gluten allergy, going to Peppes Pizza, Dominos, Pizzabakeren, McDonald’s, Subway and Burger King are good suggestions. But if you want to eat somewhere a little fancier, asking the maître d’hôtel at the restaurant is always good practice. In some cases, if it is not on the menu, they might be able to accommodate you anyway.

As the regulations for food is extremely strict in Norway, the ingredients for anything you buy is always printed on the packages, and if you ask, you will always be told what is contained in the food you order.

Food safety:

Food safety is very good in Norway. Salmonella is very rare compared to other countries, and health officials inspect restaurants at a regular basis. Also tap-water is usually very nice; Voss water from Vatnestrøm in Aust-Agder is actually exported abroad, including USA.

DRINK:

Norway is often described as a “dry” country, because alcohol is highly priced and a glass of wine or beer in a restaurant costs at least 60 kr. When in cities and towns with many students such as Oslo, Bergen, Trondheim and Tromsø, you can very often find lower prices. Ask young people in the streets or at your place of accommodation for hints and tips of where to go. Beer can be bought at the supermarkets, however wine and stronger alcoholic beverages have to be purchased in state owned liquor stores (Vinmonopolet). The Vinmonopolet is a monopoly but maintains high quality and a wide selection of products; the finest products are moderately priced. The price of alcohol, however does not stop the locals from having a good time. They are often found drinking and carrying on in local street parties and on their porches.

The high prices is one reason why the tradition to hold vorspiel and nachspiel before going out is very popular in Norway. The words derives from German and can be translated into pre- and after party. If going out in the weekend, it is not unknown for Norwegians to gather at a friend’s house and not leave for the nightclub until after midnight. So if you’ve seen Norwegian drinking culture abroad, and are shocked by the empty bar/club at 23:00, call your Norwegian friend and ask where the vorspiel is. (If that person is one of the many Swedes in Norway, vorspiel would mean foreplay – they would say foreparty.) It’s likely to be a whole lot of fun. Clubs tend to fill up around the period immediately after midnight. However this is mostly true at weekends – during normal weekdays, you will often find Norwegians sitting in bars enjoying a couple of beers or a bottle of wine.

You must be at least 18 years old to purchase beer or wine and 20 years old to purchase spirits with an alcohol content of 22% and more in Norway.

Drinking in public is prohibited. This law is very strict, and even encompasses your own balcony, if other people can see you! Luckily, the law is very seldom enforced (cases of anyone being fined on their own balcony are very rare, for instance), and Norwegians do indeed drink in parks. There are calls for modifying the antiquated law, with debate in media: most people seem to agree that drinking in parks is alright as long as people have a good time and remain peaceful. However, if you bother others and get too intoxicated or a policeman happens to be in a bad mood, you may be asked to throw away your alcohol, and in a worst-case scenario, fined. Drinking openly in the street is probably still considered somewhat rude, and it would be more likely to attract police attention than a picnic in a park, and is advised against. Having a glass of wine in an establishment that legally serves alcohol at the pavement, of course, is not a problem.

Be careful about urinating in major cities like Oslo if you’re drunk, fines for public urination can be as high as 10,000 kr! However, this normally isn’t a problem if you urinate in a place where nobody sees, like a couple of yards into the woods. Public intoxication is also something you should be a bit careful with, especially in the capital, Oslo. In smaller towns the police will have no problem giving you a night in the local jail if they think you are disrupting peace and order.

In Norway, all alcohol with a volume percentage of under 4.75% can be sold at regular shops. This means you can get decent beer all over the place. The price varies, but imported beer is usually expensive (except Danish and Dutch beers brewed in Norway on licence like Heineken and Carlsberg). Shopping hours for beer are very strict: The sale stops at 20:00 every weekday, and at 18:00 every day before holidays (incl Sundays). Since the sale times are decided by the local council, it may vary, but these are the latest times decided by law. This means the beer will have to be paid for before this time. If it’s not paid, the person behind the counter will take your beer, and tell you “Sorry pal, too late!”. On Sunday, you can’t buy takeaway alcohol anywhere.

For strong beer, wine and hard alcohol, you will have to find a Vinmonopolet branch. The state shop has a marvellous choice of drinks, but at mostly sky-high prices. The general rule is that table wines are more expensive than in nearly any other country. Expect 80–90 kr for a decent, “cheap” wine. However, as the taxation is based on the volume of alcohol per bottle rather than the wholesale cost, you can often find more exclusive wines at lower prices than in private establishments in other countries. Vinmonpolet is open until 17:00 Monday to Wednesday, 18:00 Thursday to Friday, and 15:00 on Saturday.

Many car borne visitors (and Norwegians on shopping trips to Sweden and Finland) bring alcohol into Norway, but mind the import restrictions; anything above the quota gives heavy duties.

Beers:

The brands you are most likely to see in pubs are industrial lagers from Ringnes, Hansa, Borg, CB, Mack, Aass and Frydenlund (accompanied by a vast array of imported drinks). However, in the last ten years a range of microbreweries and craft breweries have made locally produced beer of all varieties and often high quality available. For instance Nøgne Ø, Ægir, Haandbryggeriet, Kinn, 7 Fjell and many more. Beer from small or specialty breweries are also available in pubs or cafes such as Mikrobryggeriet (Bogstadveien Oslo), Lorry’s (Parkveien, Oslo), Grünerløkka Brygghus (Oslo) or Beer Palace (Aker Brygge, Oslo), Ægir (Flåm), UNA Bryggeri og Kjøkken (Bergen), Trondhjem Mikrobryggeri (Trondheim) and Christianssand Brygghus (Kristiansand). Norwegians are proud of their local breweries. At bars or pubs it is considered good manners to order a local beer first.

Non-alcoholic beverages:

There are many manufacturers of local non-alcoholic beverages, such as fruit juices all over Norway. Norwegians drink coffee in large quantities. In the larger cities there are many coffee shops and patisseries which are also meeting places.

Water:

Norwegian tap water is generally of high quality, clean and absolute drinkable. Tap water is mostley surface water, only a small proportion is obtained from sources underground. There are also bottled drinking water to buy, some added carbonic acid and/or different flavorings. Norwegian bottled water is of very high quality. Many Norwegians choose to drink water for the meals and bring drinking water when they go hiking.

A single hotel room (always book ahead for weekdays) should cost you from around 800 kr and up (special offers are common, look for them), but you can find reasonable cheap lodgings in camping huts (300–600 kr, space for entire family), DNT mountain cabins (150–300 kr per person), youth hostels (150–250 kr per person), etc. Most of these will require you to make your own food, bring your own bedsheets, and wash before leaving.

A countryside cabin, hytte, is a prized family treasure. The high demand and the limits for exploitation pushed property prices through the roof during the first decade of the 2000s, and few foreigners can afford a cabin in Norway. As currency and prices are dependent on the oil price, the return on investment is very uncertain.

For longer stays (one week or more) consider renting an apartment, a house or a high quality cabin. Several agencies offer reservations on houses or cabins owned by farmers or other locals. This type of accommodation is frequently more interesting than a standard hotel.

Campsites for caravans, campers and tents are found in a large number in Norway. Many campsites also have small cabins for rent. The standard varies. Most campsites are only open during the summer months. In addition, there are a number of parking spaces separate for campers in cities.

Hotels in Norway are generally not cheap, as Norway is a high-cost country, but there are several price ranges, and it is possible to get reasonably-priced rooms even in top-rated hotels depending on the time of the year, day of the week, and city – e.g. hotels in Oslo may be expensive on weekdays but cheaper when there is less business travel. Most hotels are found in densely populated areas, but those called høyfjellshotell are often far into the mountains. If you plan to finish your stay in Norway on a Sunday, try finding a hotel that offers a late check-out.

Opening hours in Norway are better than they used to be, though many smaller stores still close early on Saturday (13:00 or 15:00 is typical) and nearly everything is closed on Sundays. Grocery stores (particularly in the cities) have long opening hours frequently until 22:00 or 23:00 on weekdays. You’ll often see opening hours written as “9-21 (9-18)” on doors, meaning 9am to 9pm weekdays, 9am to 6pm Saturdays. The grocery market is dominated by a handful of chains covering most of Norway: Rema 1000, Kiwi, Prix and Bunnpris are low price shops with a narrow selection of items; Coop and Spar have wider selection and better quality at a slightly higher price; Meny, Mega and Ultra have fewer shops and higher prices.

Convenience stores, notably the major chains Narvesen and Mix (all over the country), Deli de Luca (bigger cities only) and 7-Eleven (bigger cities only), are open from early morning until late at night every day, with 24-hour service in the biggest cities. All over the country you will find gas-stations, Circle K, Shell, fresh/selected, YX (HydroTexaco) (these days turning into 7-eleven with gas) and Esso, On the Run. Virtually all gas-stations serve fast-food, especially sausages and cheese. Also hamburgers, pizza, and so on. The gas-stations have long opening periods, and the bigger stations in cities and near bigger crossroads are open 24 hours. Items sold in convenience stores and gas stations are relatively expensive.

Most big cities have over the years been almost exclusively dominated by shopping malls. Although you do have shopping streets like Karl Johans Gate in Oslo, Strandgaten in Bergen and Nordre gate/Olav Tryggvasons gate in Trondheim, you are bound to find malls around the country by Thon Gruppen and other major companies. Norway is also home to Scandinavias biggest mall – Sandvika Storsenter – 15 minutes outside Oslo by train. In Oslo you have Byporten Shopping Senter, Oslo City and Gunerius located right next to Oslo S train station and Paléet and Arkaden Shopping in Karl Johans Gate, as well as several malls and shopping centres a bit further out.

Getting “good deals” and bargaining is frowned upon, and the service workers are generally not authorized to give you a better price – only larger items such as cars are subject to haggling. The price you see is the price you pay. If you plan on buying tax-free, a good practice is to bring with you the necessary forms. Most stores will have these forms at hand themselves but it is a good precaution. Also, if you pay with a credit card, you might have to sign the receipt which will require some form of ID, driving licence and passport are both OK. This is due to the strict nature of money transactions.

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Norway
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Preikestolen
Location: Rogaland, Norway
Preikestolen is a tourist attraction in the municipality of Forsand in Rogaland county, Norway. Preikestolen is a steep cliff which rises 604 metres (1,982 ft) above the Lysefjorden. Atop the cliff, there is an almost flat top of approximately 25 by 25 metres (82 ft × 82 ft). It sits on the north side of the fjord, opposite the Kjerag plateau, located on the south side.

Tourism at the site has been increasing in the early 21st century, with between 150,000 and 200,000 visitors in 2012, making it one of the most visited natural tourist attractions in Norway. BASE jumpers often leap from the cliff. Due to its increased popularity, there is currently a project under way to improve the path to the site, which is only accessible via a 3.8-kilometre (2.4 mi) long hike.

The cliff was formed during the ice age, approximately 10,000 years ago, when the edges of the glacier reached the cliff. The water from the glacier froze in the crevices of the mountain and eventually broke off large, angular blocks, which were later carried away with the glacier. This is the cause of the angular shape of the plateau.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preikestolen
Name: Geiranger Fjord
Location: Sunnmøre, Norway
The Geiranger Fjord is a fjord in the Sunnmøre region of Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It is a 15km long branch off the Sunnylvsfjorden, which is a branch off the Storfjorden (Great Fjord). The small village of Geiranger is located at the end of the fjord where the Geirangelva river empties into it.

The fjord is one of Norway's most visited tourist sites. In 2005, it was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, jointly with the Nærøyfjorden, although this status is now threatened by the disputed plans to build power lines across the fjord. A car ferry, which doubles as a sightseeing trip, is operated by Fjord1 Nordvestlandske. It runs lengthwise along the fjord between the small towns of Geiranger and Hellesylt.

Along the fjord's sides there lie a number of now-abandoned farms. Some restoration has been made by the Storfjordens venner association. The most commonly visited among these are Skageflå, Knivsflå, and Blomberg. Skageflå may also be reached on foot from Geiranger, while the others require a boat excursion. The fjord is also host to several impressive waterfalls such as Seven Sisters Falls.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geirangerfjord
Name: Lofoten
Location: Nordland, Norway
Lofoten is an archipelago and a traditional district in the county of Nordland, Norway. It is known for a distinctive scenery with dramatic mountains and peaks, open sea and sheltered bays, beaches and untouched lands. Though lying within the Arctic Circle, the archipelago experiences one of the world's largest elevated temperature anomalies relative to its high latitude.

Lofoten offers many rock climbing and mountaineering opportunities. It has 24 hours of daylight in the summer and has Alpine-style ridges, summits and glaciers, but at a height of less than 1,200 metres. The main centre for rock climbing is Henningsvær on Austvågøya.

The main areas for mountaineering and climbing are on Austvågøy and Moskenesøya. Moskenesøya features remote and serious mountaineering whereas Austvågøy is very popular area for rock climbing. For more information, see the walking guide by Dyer and the rock climbing guidebook by Craggs and Enevold. Lofoten has one of the worlds most interesting football pitches on an island as used in Windows start up screens. There is also a well marked cycling route that goes from Å in the south and continues past Fiskebøl in the north.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lofoten
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN NORWAY / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

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...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

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We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

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