PARAGUAY

PARAGUAY

PARAGUAY

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Name: La Santisima Trinidad de Paranáv
Location: Itapúa Department, Paraguay
La Santisima Trinidad de Paraná is the name of a former Jesuit reduction in Paraguay. It is an example of one of the many Jesuit reductions, small colonies established by the missionaries in various locations in South America, such as Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay throughout the 17th and 18th century. These missions were built as self-contained societies that existed outside of regular Spanish colonial life that integrated indigenous populations with Christian faith.

La Santisima Trinidad de Paraná was one of the last of the Jesuit reducciones to be built in the Paraná River area encompassing southern Paraguay and northern Argentina. It is also the most highly accessible and the most visited of the historical sites today. Located near the modern day city of Encarnación, Trinidad was originally constructed in 1706, the intended self-sufficient city came complete with a central meeting plaza, where most of the celebrations, such as Mass and matrimony were celebrated, a large church meetinghouse, a school, several workshops, a museum and housing for the local Indian population.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Sant%C3%ADsima_Trinidad_de_Paraná
Name: Saltos del Monday
Location: Presidente Franco District, Paraguay
The Municipal Park Monday and its main attraction - approximately 45m tall and 120m wide waterfall named Saltos del Monday - are located in the Presidente Franco District, Alto Paraná Department, Paraguay.

The highest annual amount of the country in rainfall occurs in the region of Alto Paraná. The Municipal Park Monday includes a natural reserve of nine hectares covered by a thick vegetation, rich with diverse species of flora and fauna and is one of the last remaining blocks of the Atlantic Forest west from Paraná River.

The Monday River empties into the Paraná River, has a variable flow depending on the seasons of rain. The average annual temperature is 21 °C, the highest reaches 38 °C and the minimum 0 °C. In Presidente Franco District, nature gives the region a show over the waters, the imposing Monday Falls, form a remarkable natural spectacle that has a long history, it was one of the stations in the path of the pre-Hispanic Guarani. The waterfall is more than 40 meters high and consists of three main falls with other minors who rushed up near the mouth of the River Monday, one of the major tributaries of the right bank of the Parana River.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saltos_del_Monday
Name: National Pantheon of the Heroes
Location: Asunción, Paraguay
The National Pantheon of the Heroes is a building and landmark of Asunción, Paraguay, and a national monument of Paraguay.

In October 1863, the then president Francisco Solano López ordered the construction of the chapel of the Virgin of the Asuncion, which was designed by Italian architect Alejandro Ravizza, in collaboration with the builder Giacomo Colombino. But as a result of the War of the Triple Alliance, the building remained unfinished and scaffolding for over 70 years. Only after the Chaco War in 1936 was able to finish and was inaugurated on October 12 of that year, to become by presidential decree in National Pantheon of Heroes.

The National Pantheon is the mausoleum of the country, where lie the remains of the great heroes of Paraguayan history such as Don Carlos Antonio López (1st president Constitutional), Mariscal Francisco Solano López, Mariscal José Félix Estigarribia (hero and winner of the Chaco War against Bolivia) and his wife. In addition, the Children Martyrs Acosta Ñu, two Unknown Soldiers, among others. Within the enclosure of the pantheon have set countless illustrious honorary plaques sent by foreign rulers, kings and princes.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Pantheon_of_the_Heroes
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN PARAGUAY / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO PARAGUAY.
FACTS:
Official Languages: Spanish / Paraguayan Guaraní
Currency: Paraguay Guarani (PYG)
Time zone: PYT (Paraguay Time) (UTC–4) / PYST (Paraguay Summer Time) (UTC–3)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +595
Local / up-to-date weather in Asunción (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Paraguay travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Paraguay, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO PARAGUAY.

The currency is the guaraní (ISO 4217 code: PYG), denoted by the symbol ₲. The abbreviation “GS.” is generally used locally, and it is used in Wikivoyage articles as well. Banknotes in denominations of ₲2,000, 5,000, 10,000, 20,000, 50,000 and 100,000 circulate.

Always check the exchange rate quotations on the internet or several major newspapers before exchanging money. However, since summer 2015 exchange rates to the US dollar have been quite stable.

ATMs:

ATMs are widespread available, even in places like Vallemí. Most banks (Banco Continental, BBVA/B24, Regional, Vision Banco, Itaú, Banco Familiar, Banco Interfisa, etc.) however belong to the same network (Red Infonet) and charge GS.25,000 for each withdrawal with credit card, but allow amounts up to GS.1,500,000. BNF uses a different network but is not reliably working with Visa. You might be lucky with an international bank, but they are hard to find or just do not exist.

Money exchange:

Never exchange money with the vendors at the street. They usually have very bad rates and cannot really be trusted.

In Asunción, there are many regular cambios, which offer quite competitive rates for US dollars, with the exchange rate being barely 1% off the interbank exchange rate.

Thus way, exchanging money instead of using credit card and ATM is actually preferable. Although, carrying too much (foreign) money on the other hand is neither a good idea. However, if you are coming from Uruguay, it might be a good idea to use the ability of their ATMs to cash out US dollars for this purpose. Otherwise, in Paraguay, you will always have to withdraw larger amounts of cash with ATMs to keep the fee percentages low.

BY BUS:

Buses, also called Colectivos in Paraguay, are the most common public transport. There are many companies running different lines. You must check which one serves your destination.

When leaving from Asunción, the web page of the bus terminal has information about ticket prices for all destinations and bus companies as well as departure times. The site is in Spanish only and there’s no information about travel times nor schedules for trips towards Asuncion.

Some intercity bus companies include:

  • Nuestra Señora de la Asunción
  • La Encarnacena

BY TAXI:

Taxis are expensive compared to other prices in Paraguay, and in Asunción the fares are determined by the meter. Tipping in taxis is not customary among locals (although drivers do appreciate it). Expect to pay a small surcharge on top of the fare if you are taking a taxi late in the evening, or on a Sunday.

Outside Asunción there are no meters so make sure you decide on a price before you get in. Bargaining on a price may be useful, as tourists have been asked for USD10 for a five-minute ride. To prevent any disputes, always ask your hotel concierge how much the real cost of the fare should be.

BY CAR:

There are highways connecting all the major regions of Paraguay, but most of them are one lane each way. You may hit toll booths along the way. Police may pull you over for any reason and will expect bribes. Locals may say that the most common way to avoid giving away too much money on the bribes requested by the ‘polícia caminera’ (road police) is by giving them a small guarani bill while shaking their hands when they stop your car. Also, it is advised that, when they ask you, play dumb until they let you go with a warning and do not admit to travelling through Paraguay for the first time. Refrain from handing out bribes (known as coimas in Paraguay) since it is only harmful for the country. Tell them that you don´t carry money and that you weren´t aware that was not allowed. If you have actually committed something wrong, you should pay the fine and always ask for a receipt.

You will probably only face this kind of problem with the police on the country roads. These problems do not generally occur in any of the wealthier areas of the major cities where you can keep a somewhat ‘nicer’ relationship with the police.

EAT:

Paraguayan food is one of the most diverse in South America. Paraguayans usually enjoy typical food several times a week all year round. You’ll find much of the standard South American cuisine here with some Brazilian influence as well. Paraguayan food isn’t particularly spicy, so those who can’t tolerate spices won’t have problems here.

Paraguay has a tradition for beef which is normally good quality and cheap. Grilled meat (asado) is the thing to eat. Pasta is also popular as are the street stalls selling panchos (hot-dogs), hamburgers, empanadas and similar fast-food. Vegetables, salad and other types of meat are not that common but available. In restaurants you normally get manioc as a side dish for free (similar to bread in other countries).

Local specialties:

You must try the Paraguayan traditional food, which includes dishes like the following:

  • Chipa-a bread baked in an outdoor oven or “tatacua”, usually made out of mandioca (manioc) flour. Mandioca is often substituted for potatoes. Mandioca, or Mandi´o in Guarani is similar to a potato, and is normally eaten boiled but can be fried. It is eaten almost everyday by Paraguayans, and many have it growing on their land.
  • Mbeju is a mandioca starch and Paraguayan cheese based flatbread.
  • Pastel madi’o is a manioc pastry stuffed with “So’o ku’í” or minced meat.
  • Sopa Paraguaya is a form of corn bread are two of the most well known. Sopa means soup, so it is an unusual experience to be actually eating a solid soup, probably the only one in the world.
  • Tortillas in Paraguay are different than in other places in Latin America. It is more like a fried dough (made with Paraguayan cheese).
  • Payagua mascada (Guarani for chewing gum for dogs but has nothing to do with that) is a tortilla also made with manioc and beef (high in proteins and calories).
  • Try Sopa So’o if you get the chance–it is Paraguayan cornbread with bits of pieces of meat often marinated with garlic and lime.
  • Pira caldo is a soup consisting of catfish, tomatoes, fat and spices
  • Asado (BBQ) is great, and prices are quite reasonable – ₲20,000 will get you an all-you-can-eat buffet at many nice places. ₲5,000 is enough to pay for a hamburger.
  • Also highly popular are empanadas (meat/egg stuffed in a pastry and baked) and milanesa (breaded and fried chicken/beef/fish) – these are considered fast food, and are also found in other countries in the region. If you order a hamburger at a restaurant, expect it to come topped with a fried egg.

DRINK:

Mate and Tereré:

The most common drink in Paraguay is Mate made of Yerba Mate (Mate herbs) that is similar in style to tea but the preparation is distinct. To add sugar is not common in Paraguay. The infusion is prepared by pouring dry yerba into the cup, then adding water: hot water version is known as mate (preferred in Argentina and Uruguay) while the cold water version is known as tereré and is a local favourite. When it is hot outside, it is more common to drink it as tereré, served in guampas, which can be made out of wood or of hallow bull horns, and is drunk through a metal straw called a bombilla.

Mate is usually enjoyed in the early mornings and late evenings especially during cold days in winter. Terere is enjoyed year-round, though not during lunch time and past sunset, as many recommend. Still, you can see every type of Paraguayan (from construction workers to business executives) carry their tereré set during all times. It is a social activity so the cup is passed around – with in between a refill for each person. If you are offered either you should accept at least one cup. If you can get used to the taste and participate, locals will be appreciative. Often, herbs are added to the tereré water (locally called ‘remedios’ or ‘yuyos’, which cure different ailments). For example, adding coconut to one’s mate is supposed to help with headaches. The taste is best described as earthy, like a bitter green tea, and it will take getting used to before you can enjoy it.

Drinking mate or tereré is most definitely one of the social customs of Paraguay. Shops will close around noon for a siesta and for a round of mate/tereré with friends.

Another variation of preparation is to boil the yerba on the stove with sugar then strain it before serving it with milk. It tastes a bit like smoked tea. In this form it is called Cocido, which simply means “cooked”.

Other non-alcoholic beverages:

  • Coffee is mostly of an Italian variety.
  • Gaseosa means fizzy drinks of any description. All the usual brands are available. Try the local Guarana.
  • Pulp is a very popular Paraguayan soft drink. You can buy it a supermarkets or order it in various restaurantes and bars. The original is Pulp Naranja, made with real orange juice.
  • Mosto helado is extracted from the sugar cane and very sweet,sometimes mixed with lime juice to make an ‘aloja’. You can find street carts selling mosto near the centro area and in the countryside.
  • In Paraguay, orange juice and other fruit juices, unless squeezed fresh, are almost always reconstituted from dehydrated concentrate. This applies to all unrefrigerated Tetra-Pak juices. The dehydration process destroys vitamin C, and unlike in the West, ascorbic acid may not be added back after reconstitution, thus these fruit juices may not contain any appreciable amount of vitamin C. Either check the packaging, buy fresh juice (freshly squeezed from a street vendor, or Purifru brand in the refrigerator cabinet), or enjoy the wide variety of fresh fruit available on many street corners.

Alcoholic beverages:

  • Beer is widely available, as are many liquors. The national beer brand is Pilsen. However, Brazil’s Brahma is very popular.
  • Paraguayan hard liquor is similar to rum and is known locally as caña. It is made out of sugar cane.

Good accommodation will certainly not be hard to find in major towns, and will seem reasonably cheap if the parameter is the dollar or the euro. Prices for cheap and decent accommodation range from GS.40,000 (in/near Asunción and Conceptión) to GS.60,000 (in Encarnación).

The exception, however, is Ciudad del Este. In Ciuded del Este the cheapest accommodation is near the bus station with doubles for less than €10, in an area that is also pleasant in the evening. Cheaper accommodation is easy to find, but if you’re after something of higher quality, then you’ll have better chances in Foz do Iguaçu (Brazil), just a short bus ride (R$5.50 or GS.8,000) across the bridge, or in Puerto Iguazu (Argentinia). However, Brazil is easier regarding immigration, not requiring people to have a stamp if just visiting for a day and thus not checking the buses that cross into Brazil or leave it. This option is not available with Argentina, and this crossing is also considerably more time consuming.

Camping in Paraguay is possible and easy, especially in remote regions like the Chaco. Many opportunities exist, just along the highways often you need to search a little more, because the roads are often spotted with poor indigenous population. Camping near the border region with Brazil is probably not recommended. For remote camping sites consult OpenStreetMap, which is also used by this travel guide, and by many mobile Apps like OsmAnd (complex with many add-ons) and MAPS.ME (easy but limited). It is community-based and listed (remote) camping site are often verified by real people.

Paraguay has a very rich and diverse craftmanship, everything from silver filigree (Luque) to cotton fine lace in the form of Ñanduti (Itaugua) is available. Also leather goods with local “repujado” embellishments (Atyra) and ao poi, encaje yu embroidery. Clay ceramic (Ita) and weavery is also very popular, cheap and beautiful. Leather soccer balls are sold and hand made in the town of Quiindy.

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Paraguay
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PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: La Santisima Trinidad de Paranáv
Location: Itapúa Department, Paraguay
La Santisima Trinidad de Paraná is the name of a former Jesuit reduction in Paraguay. It is an example of one of the many Jesuit reductions, small colonies established by the missionaries in various locations in South America, such as Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay throughout the 17th and 18th century. These missions were built as self-contained societies that existed outside of regular Spanish colonial life that integrated indigenous populations with Christian faith.

La Santisima Trinidad de Paraná was one of the last of the Jesuit reducciones to be built in the Paraná River area encompassing southern Paraguay and northern Argentina. It is also the most highly accessible and the most visited of the historical sites today. Located near the modern day city of Encarnación, Trinidad was originally constructed in 1706, the intended self-sufficient city came complete with a central meeting plaza, where most of the celebrations, such as Mass and matrimony were celebrated, a large church meetinghouse, a school, several workshops, a museum and housing for the local Indian population.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Sant%C3%ADsima_Trinidad_de_Paraná
Name: Saltos del Monday
Location: Presidente Franco District, Paraguay
The Municipal Park Monday and its main attraction - approximately 45m tall and 120m wide waterfall named Saltos del Monday - are located in the Presidente Franco District, Alto Paraná Department, Paraguay.

The highest annual amount of the country in rainfall occurs in the region of Alto Paraná. The Municipal Park Monday includes a natural reserve of nine hectares covered by a thick vegetation, rich with diverse species of flora and fauna and is one of the last remaining blocks of the Atlantic Forest west from Paraná River.

The Monday River empties into the Paraná River, has a variable flow depending on the seasons of rain. The average annual temperature is 21 °C, the highest reaches 38 °C and the minimum 0 °C. In Presidente Franco District, nature gives the region a show over the waters, the imposing Monday Falls, form a remarkable natural spectacle that has a long history, it was one of the stations in the path of the pre-Hispanic Guarani. The waterfall is more than 40 meters high and consists of three main falls with other minors who rushed up near the mouth of the River Monday, one of the major tributaries of the right bank of the Parana River.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saltos_del_Monday
Name: National Pantheon of the Heroes
Location: Asunción, Paraguay
The National Pantheon of the Heroes is a building and landmark of Asunción, Paraguay, and a national monument of Paraguay.

In October 1863, the then president Francisco Solano López ordered the construction of the chapel of the Virgin of the Asuncion, which was designed by Italian architect Alejandro Ravizza, in collaboration with the builder Giacomo Colombino. But as a result of the War of the Triple Alliance, the building remained unfinished and scaffolding for over 70 years. Only after the Chaco War in 1936 was able to finish and was inaugurated on October 12 of that year, to become by presidential decree in National Pantheon of Heroes.

The National Pantheon is the mausoleum of the country, where lie the remains of the great heroes of Paraguayan history such as Don Carlos Antonio López (1st president Constitutional), Mariscal Francisco Solano López, Mariscal José Félix Estigarribia (hero and winner of the Chaco War against Bolivia) and his wife. In addition, the Children Martyrs Acosta Ñu, two Unknown Soldiers, among others. Within the enclosure of the pantheon have set countless illustrious honorary plaques sent by foreign rulers, kings and princes.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Pantheon_of_the_Heroes
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN PARAGUAY / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

Global Immigration Leader, Big 4

“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

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