PHILIPPINES

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PHILIPPINES

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Name: Boracay
Location: Western Visayas, Philippines
Boracay is a small island in the Philippines located approximately 315 kilometres (196 mi) south of Manila and 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) off the northwest tip of Panay Island in Western Visayas region of the Philippines. Boracay Island and its beaches have received awards from numerous travel publications and agencies. The island comprises the barangays of Manoc-Manoc, Balabag, and Yapak in the municipality of Malay, in Aklan Province. The island is administered by the Tourism Infrastructure and Enterprise Zone Authority and the provincial government of Aklan. Apart from its white sand beaches, Boracay is also famous for being one of the world's top destinations for relaxation. As of 2013 it was emerging among the top destinations for tranquility and nightlife.

Boracay was awarded as the 2012 best island in the world from the international travel magazine Travel + Leisure. In 2014, the resort island was at the top of the Best Islands in the World list published by the international magazine Condé Nast Traveler. In 2016, Boracay headed the magazine's list of Top 10 destinations to watch.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boracay
Name: Chocolate Hills
Location: Bohol province, Philippines
The Chocolate Hills are a geological formation in the Bohol province of the Philippines. There are at least 1,260 hills but there may be as many as 1,776 hills spread over an area of more than 50 square kilometres (20 sq mi). They are covered in green grass that turns brown (like chocolate) during the dry season, hence the name.

The Chocolate Hills is a famous tourist attraction of Bohol. They are featured in the provincial flag and seal to symbolize the abundance of natural attractions in the province. They are in the Philippine Tourism Authority's list of tourist destinations in the Philippines; they have been declared the country's third National Geological Monument and proposed for inclusion in the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Of the 1,247 hills, two have been developed into resorts for tourism as of 2006. The original viewing station of the Chocolate Hills is a government-owned and operated resort called "Chocolate Hills Complex" located in Carmen, Bohol, about 55 km (34 miles) from Tagbilaran. The other way to view the Chocolate Hills is at Sagbayan Peak, a mountain resort in Sagbayan town.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chocolate_Hills
Name: Puerto Princesa Subterranean River National Park
Location: Philippines
The Puerto Princesa Subterranean River National Park is a protected area of the Philippines. It was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1999, and voted as a New7Wonders of Nature in 2012. The park is located in the Saint Paul Mountain Range on the western coast of the island, about 80 kilometres (50 mi) north of the city centre of Puerto Princesa, Palawan, and contains the Puerto Princesa Subterranean River.

Birds comprise the largest group of vertebrates found in the park. Of the 252 bird species known to occur in Palawan, a total of 165 species of birds were recorded in the park. This represents 67% of the total birds and all of the 15 endemic bird species of Palawan. Notable species seen in the park are the blue-naped parrot, Tabon scrub fowl, hill myna, Palawan hornbill, white breasted sea eagle.

There are also some 30 mammal species that have been recorded. Most often observed in the forest canopy and along the shoreline feeding during low tide is the long-tailed macaque, the only primate found in the area. Other mammal species in the park are the bearded pig, bearcat, Palawan stink badger and the Palawan porcupine.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puerto_Princesa_Subterranean_River_National_Park
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COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO PHILIPPINES.
FACTS:
Official Languages: Filipino / English
Currency: Philippines Peso (PHP)
Time zone: PST (Philippine Time) (UTC+8)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +63
Local / up-to-date weather in Manila (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Philippines travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Philippines, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
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TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO PHILIPPINES.

The Philippine peso (or piso), ISO code: PHP, is the official currency and is the only currency used for most transactions. It is usually denoted by the symbol “₱” (or P, without the double strike). One peso is subdivided into 100 centavos (or sentimo), denoted with the symbol ¢ (or c). Wikivoyage uses ₱ for pesos.

  • Coins: 1¢, 5¢, 10¢, 25¢, ₱1, ₱5, ₱10, and ₱20. There are two sets of coins in circulation: the 2018 “New Generation” series and the older 1995 “New Design” series. The 2018 coins are all nickel-plated steel; there is no 10¢ coin, and ₱20 coins are introduced in late 2019. Coins from 1995 are of various materials and colors.
  • Bills: ₱20 (orange), ₱50 (red), ₱100 (purplish blue), ₱200 (green), ₱500 (yellow), and ₱1000 (light blue). Older versions of each bill have been demonetized since December 2016. The old bills have similar colors to their new counterparts, have the same people at the front (except for the ₱500 bill which also features former President Aquino) but rather than historical sites at the back, the newer bills feature Filipino natural wonders and species unique to the country.

U.S. dollars and euros may be accepted in some circumstances, but don’t count on it.

Travellers usually see ₱20 and ₱50 bills, and ₱1, ₱5 and ₱10 coins as the most useful for common purchases. Centavo coins are nearly worthless: convenience stores, supermarkets and bus conductors are the few to hand them out as change, but they are commonly thrown away. Always have some coins in hand during morning hours; jeepney, taxi, tricycle drivers, and some merchants follow the barya lang [po] sa umaga rule, insisting they need coins to give back as change later the day. Beware of counterfeits: bills from ₱100 and above are common targets by counterfeiters, but fake ₱20 and ₱50s also show up, especially in small shops.

The Philippines is fundamentally a cash-only society; it’s just fine to carry wads of ₱1000 bills for medium to large purchases, though it’s also risky. Some machines like coin-operated vending machines or coin laundries only accept ₱5 coins while pisonet computers accept ₱1, but many are not yet designed to accept coins from 2018. Machines selling drinks generally accept bills up to ₱50 in value.

Currency conversion:

Money changers are common in malls and tourist areas, but less so elsewhere. A rule of thumb is that the more currency you wish to exchange, the more favorable the rates can be. Banks are widely available to exchange currency but usually impose a minimum amount (usually around US$100), generally have worse rates than money changers, and are usually open only from 9AM to 3PM (sometimes 4:30PM) on weekdays. However, you can enjoy their air conditioning during a long wait. Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) and Banco de Oro (BDO) have longer operating hours (sometimes as late as 7PM) in some locations.

Don’t exchange money in stalls along the streets as some of them might be exchanging your money for counterfeit money. Contact Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (Central Bank of the Philippines or BSP) if you suspect the money you’ve been given is counterfeit. Money changers do exist at department stores, supermarkets and hotels but the rates are highly unfavorable to customers and some will only exchange into pesos.

Banking:

Having a Philippine bank account is useful for long-term travellers or permanent residents, but not for an ordinary tourist or business traveler. International banks like Citibank or HSBC have only a few branches in large cities and opening a new account requires a huge deposit. The major local banks, like BDO, BPI or Metrobank, may be a better option. Foreigners must have a valid passport, an Alien Certificate of Registration card and proof of a Philippines address – most often the residency certificate you got from the barangay. Most bank staff can speak English well.

Most of the 20,000 ATMs are connected to the local BancNet ATM network. Most banks will have at least one ATM on bank premises, and there are lots of off-site ATMs in shopping malls and other commercial buildings, mostly in the cities. In rural areas, often the only available ATMs are from Land Bank of the Philippines or the Philippine National Bank (PNB).

International networks like Plus and Cirrus are accessible with many ATMs, with Cirrus being more predominant, although many ATMs support both. Some banks also support other cards, including American Express, Diners Club, JCB and China UnionPay. Withdrawals are often limited to ₱10,000 depending on the bank. Most local banks charge a usage fee of ₱250 for using foreign cards. The best ATMs to withdraw money from are at one of the HSBC branches (eight in Metro Manila, and one each in Cebu City and Davao), where you can take out ₱40000 per transaction with no usage fee.

Credit card holders can use Visa, MasterCard, American Express, UnionPay, Diners Club and JCB cards, especially in the cities and in tourist areas, but merchants usually require a minimum purchase amount before they start accepting credit cards. Smaller merchants are usually cash-only. Credit cards are generally not accepted for government-related transactions, and in rural areas, credit card acceptance can range from limited to virtually non-existent.

Pay close attention when using ATMs, even when using ATMs on bank premises. While credit card fraud is uncommon in the Philippines, ATM tampering happens regularly. Obvious signs that an ATM has been tampered include loosely-installed keypads, larger-than-usual card slots, and wires or features that seem out of place.

BY PLANE:

Since the Philippines is an archipelago, the easiest way to move between islands is by plane. Philippine Airlines (and its regional carrier, PAL Express), Cebu Pacific (and its regional carrier, Cebgo) and Philippines AirAsia have significant domestic operations, linking many major towns and cities. There are also several smaller carriers which serve resort destinations (such as Amanpulo in Palawan), as well as more remote destinations. While most cities are served by jet aircraft, some destinations are served by propeller-driven planes.

The route networks of most local airlines are heavily centered around Manila and Cebu: flying between domestic points usually entails having to transit one of those cities (sometimes both), although direct flights between other major cities are slowly being introduced. Reaching Sulu and Tawi-Tawi by air is a special case: travelers must fly through Zamboanga City.

A significant majority of domestic flights in the Philippines are operated by low-cost carriers and are consequently economy-only: PAL is the only airline to offer business class on domestic flights. This does not mean however that fares are affordable: domestic seat sales are a common feature throughout the year, and all major airlines regularly offer promo fares on their websites. However, fares increase significantly during major peak travel seasons (particularly during Christmas, Holy Week and Undas), and in places served by only one airline (such as Camiguin or Marinduque), fares also increase during major provincial or town fiestas. Flights are frequently full during peak travel season, so it is advisable to book well in advance. Local airlines have regular “seat sales”, advertising cheap fares for flights to domestic destinations. However, some tickets booked during a seat sale may only be used on dates well after the duration of the sale (sometimes up to a year after the sale) and advertised fares usually exclude government taxes and fuel surcharges.

Passengers departing on domestic flights from Clark Airport must pay a ₱150 terminal fee before entering the pre-departure area; all the other airports in the Philippines (including NAIA) have the fee included in the ticket.

Provide extra time at airports for landside security checks before the departures hall, where all bags are checked, and passengers or visitors must pass through a metal detector.

BY TRAIN:

The Philippine National Railways (PNR) operates two overnight intercity services on Luzon Island: the Bicol Express between Manila and Naga, Camarines Sur, and the Mayon Limited between Manila and Ligao in Albay. See the Luzon article for more information.

BY CAR:

Roads in the Philippines vary greatly in quality from the paved multi-lane expressways of Luzon to the narrow dirt roads of remote mountain areas, which may complicate travel by car. Most major roads have two lanes and are normally paved with asphalt or concrete, although multi-lane roads are common near major cities. Street layouts in most cities and towns have never changed since the Spanish colonial era, and roads there are often narrow, with lots of blind corners. Road atlases and maps are available at bookstores throughout the country, and are very helpful when driving, especially when driving alone.

Foreign driver’s licenses are legally valid in the Philippines for up to 90 days after arrival, after which a Philippine driver’s license is required. It may also be a good idea to carry your passport showing that your last entry into the Philippines was less than 91 days ago.

Vehicular traffic in the Philippines moves on the right, and the vast majority of road signs are in English, with a few in Filipino. Road signs are based on a mix of American and European standards. Road marking are usually white, the same as in most of Europe, save for the no-overtaking lines, that always uses yellow, like in most of the Americas. While most major highways have good signage and markings, it is less common in inner city and minor roads. Road sign theft is also a common problem even in the highways, and stolen signs can cause a fatal crash, especially at night.

BY MOTORCYCLE:

Motorcycles and scooters (either can be called moto in Filipino English) are extremely common in the country, mostly Japanese brands plus some Filipino brands such as Rusi. Most are in the 125‑200cc range. They are available for rent (typically at around ₱300 a day) in many cities and tourist areas, and it is common for long-term visitors to buy one.

Motorcycle riding here is not for the faint of heart and motorcyclists are fairly often killed, mainly because of dangerous driving habits like drunk driving or illegal overtaking. See Driving in the Philippines.

There is a national law requiring helmets, but it is not consistently enforced in all regions.

BY TAXI:

Taxis are generally available within the major cities but are usually not used for travel across the various provinces and regions. UV Express (shared taxis using white vans) usually ply provincial routes. You can also call reputable taxi companies that can arrange pickups and transfers as well as airport runs.

When hailing a taxi in the cities, ensure the meter is on and pay the metered fare. A tip of ₱10 is acceptable. Also, make sure you have coins and small denomination bills, as the drivers often claim not to have change in an effort to obtain a larger tip, and in morning periods, many drivers only accept coins as payment (watch out for the ubiquitous Barya lang po sa umaga sign or sticker)! Moreover, don’t be surprised if drivers want to bypass the meter during rush hour. Most taxis have the flag down rate of ₱40 with each 300 meters cost ₱3.50 while Yellow cab taxis are more expensive with a flag-down rate of ₱70 with each 300 meters cost ₱4 (April 2011).

You may book a taxi using GPS enabled mobile apps such as “Grab Taxi” and “Easy Taxi” for a small fee. This is better than hailing a cab because you can see the number of available taxis and their location via GPS. Once you have a confirmed taxi booking, the name, photo, plate number and telephone number will appear on your mobile device and you can communicate with your driver to let him know exactly where you are. This is available in Metro Manila and Cebu.

BY BUS:

Apart from flying, buses are usually the way to go when it comes to traveling across the Philippines, at least from within the major islands. For interisland trips which entail ferry rides, an airline ticket, however, undercuts a bus trip significantly in cost, except where the island destination is reached only by one airline and/or the air fare is expensive.

City buses are only available in large metropolitan areas such as Metro Manila or Metro Cebu; for small or medium-sized cities or municipalities, jeepneys or the related multicab rule. City bus operators generally use long-distance coaches, but low-floor buses are slowly taking over. There is ordinarily a conductor who will punch or print the tickets and collect fares.

Provincial buses, or coaches, are widely available. Long-haul services, roughly beyond 4 hours or 200 km (120 mi), generally depart in the morning or late afternoon, and tickets must be booked at the bus station or a booking office. Shorter provincial routes generally have more frequent departures, from 30 minutes to a hour, tickets are purchased on board, and service is in overall, no-frills. Regardless of trip length, vendors selling mildly overpriced food and drinks enter buses at the terminal or at major stops.

There are five classes of buses, and may differ by company. Only two classes are provided on urban routes:

  • Ordinary (economy) — The slowest of the five types, they make more frequent stops, and are not air-conditioned. Windows are usually left open. Seats can be wooden or upholstered, and are narrower. In some places, especially poorer regions, the vehicles may be rebuilt from used heavy trucks, and of a size between those of a jeepney and of a long-distance bus.
  • Standard air-conditioned (air-conditioned economy) — City buses and short-distance provincial operators often offer this class. Usually have 41 seats, and legroom is almost like those on economy class of airlines.
  • Deluxe (second class, sometimes called executive on some carriers) — Takes the most direct routes, and most used on long-haul trips or services that mostly travels through expressways. Vehicles all have air-conditioning. Deluxe buses usually have 38-40 seats, and legroom may be more generous.
  • Super deluxe – Same as deluxe, but with more legroom and fewer seats (usually around 34). May have a toilet and personal entertainment systems.
  • Luxury (first class) – Similar to super deluxe, but with larger seats in a 2-1 layout, with around 26 seats. They have the most expensive fares, around 140% of a standard air-conditioned bus.

The air conditioning can be harshly cool, so bring a light jacket, sweater or blanket to wrap yourself. Ordinary class buses have been phased out in some heavily plied provincial routes, but remain on some city bus routes around Manila and services to or within poorer provinces.

Fares are regulated, so you pay the same regardless of the carrier. City bus fares starts at ₱12 (₱10 on ordinary class buses) for the first 5 km, increasing by ₱2.25 (ordinary: ₱1.75) per additional kilometer. Provincial bus fares are calculated for every 5 km, being ₱7.75 on standard air-conditioned, ₱8.50 on ordinary, ₱8.25 on deluxe (₱8.75 on super deluxe) and ₱11 on luxury, but there may be additional surcharges for meal stops and ferries. A 20% discount is available to seniors and students if you present a valid ID. It’s common to round the fare to the nearest ₱5.

The Philippines has no state-owned bus line, or a national carrier; instead, there are many private bus companies which operate routes under a government franchise. Routes are generally served by one or more carriers, but fares are the same regardless of distance. Many bus companies, especially on heavily-plied routes, pay drivers based on passengers carried per trip, so dangerous driving habits are common because drivers are pressured to pick up the most passengers. The concept of interlining doesn’t exist in Philippine bus lines, so you must buy another ticket when transferring. Some bus companies now allows ticket pre-booking online.

City and provincial buses often have a TV, audio system, or both (watch for the “Audio/Video” sticker on the bus windshield). On-board WiFi is increasily becoming available on buses, though speeds are highly variable and often slow. Front seats are allocated to people with disabilities, the elderly, pregnant women, or students, so you must swap seats as a courtesy. On a long-haul trip, you must do so even if your reserved ticket assigns you a front seat.

Rules on food and live animals vary by carrier, so check carefully. Food and beverages are generally allowed, but eating messy foods are discouraged, and some carriers ban them.

Bulky luggage are generally kept under the buses, but those in the poorer provinces may have a roof rack instead.

Outside of Mindanao, where most cities and towns will have a central bus station, bus stations tend to be scattered and divided between the bus companies, so transfers can be bothersome. This is changing as municipalies are investing in centralized bus stations, with connections to local transportation.

EAT:

Filipino cuisine has developed from the different cultures that shaped its history; it is like Southeast Asian cuisine but with Spanish influences. Though its cuisine is not as renowned as many of its neighbours, such as that of Thailand and Vietnam, Filipino cooking is nonetheless distinct in that it is possibly the least spicy of all South East Asian cuisines. Don’t make the mistake of thinking that Filipino food is bland, though. It is just that instead of spices, Filipino food depends more on garlic, onions and ginger to add flavor to dishes. Painstaking preparation and prolonged cooking time is also a characteristic of most Filipino dishes, and when done properly is often what brings out the flavor of the food, as opposed to a healthy dose of spices. As with the rest of Southeast Asia, rice is the staple food of the Philippines.

To experience how the Filipinos eat in a budget way, carinderias (eateries) and turo-turo (literally “point-point”, buffet-style restaurants where you choose the food to be served to you) are some of the options. Mains cost less than ₱50. Carinderias serve food cooked earlier and it may not always be the safest of options.

You’ll be hard pressed to find a mall without the requisite American fast food chains. Filipino fast food chains that capture the essence of Filipino food compete strongly for Filipino taste buds however. Jollibee, Chowking and Mang Inasal may be a safe place for the tourist to try the local fare.

Filipino street food is one of the best however it may not be as clean as the ones you find in Singapore. Street food vendors have been criticized because of their unhygienic practices and unhealthy options but praised by many especially the youth because of its affordability and taste. Street food is also found in malls, and tend to be better that those sold in the street.

Tropical fruits abound in the Philippines. Most of the countryside produce finds its way to the metro areas and can be easily bought in supermarkets.

Meal patterns are basically similar to those in the Spanish-speaking world due to the country’s history. Lunch is the most important meal, eaten between 11AM to 3PM, and a mid-morning or afternoon snack (merienda) is common.

Some Filipinos strictly use the serving spoon rule, believing that offering utensils or food that had come contact with someone’s saliva is rude, disgusting, and will cause food to get stale quickly. Singing or having an argument while eating is considered rude, as they believe food is grasya/gracia or grace in English; food won’t come to you if you keep disrespecting it. Filipinos usually say a prayer before food is served, furthermore wait till the host invites you to start eating. Also, it is rude to refuse food that the host offers or leave the dining table while someone is still eating.

Dietary restrictions:

Vegetarians and vegans will find it difficult to find a Filipino dish which is wholly vegetarian as most of the Filipinos love to add meat in every single dish they eat. You can find some vegetarian restaurants in the Philippines, mostly lurking in the commercial, financial and provincial capitals, and most of them use tofu instead of meat. Nearly all towns have large markets with a fine selection of fruits and vegetables, mostly at good prices.

Muslims will find it hard to find Halal food outside predominantly Muslim areas in the Philippines. Hindus will find Indian restaurants which serve some vegetarian options in the most of the larger cities. Jews will also find it hard to find Kosher meals. However rabbis in the Philippines suggest some stores which sell Kosher food.

DRINK:

Due to the tropical climate of the Philippines, chilled drinks are popular. Stands selling chilled drinks and shakes are common especially in shopping malls.

Filipinos (except for observant Muslims) love to drink (and get drunk). Filipinos rarely consume alcohol by itself. They would normally have what is called as “pulutan” or bar chow alongside their drinks which is like the equivalent of tapas. Beer is perhaps the most common form of alcohol consumed in bars. Alcohol is extremely cheap in the Philippines, and one of the cheapest in the whole of Asia.

Accommodation options range from luxury five-star hotels/resorts to backpacker inns, but off the beaten track, options are sparse. Rates begin at ₱200, or higher depending on location, season and demand. Large cities such as Manila or Cebu have a higher price bracket, so do major tourist destinations.

Homestays (or “transient homes”, or “transient”) or bed and breakfasts are common in the provinces, especially in tourist towns that do not have much commercial accommodation. Many are just basic homes that provide meals, but some may have a swimming pool.

Motels (or “short-time [hotels]”) are another cheap option, but they have a reputation for being havens for illicit sex. They tend to be scattered in red-light districts, but many are clustered along major highways. Rates are per hour than per day, and it generally costs ₱600-1000 for overnight stays (at least 6 to 10 hours), or ₱200-400 for short stays (2 to 5 hours).

Hotels and resorts are usually for the higher-end traveler, although rates — even for four-star establishments — are not very high compared to other international destinations. Condotels are furnished condominium units rented out for long or short term stays, while apartelles are set up for both short and long term stays. Pension houses, tourist inns and lodging houses are usually more basic and economical from ₱200 per night.

Cheaper places often have only fans instead of air conditioning, and no private toilet or shower. Even if you get a private shower, it may not have hot water, but this is not a big problem in a hot country. Bathtubs are rare in any accommodation, and the shower is often not separated from the toilet except in top-end hotels.

There are backpacker hostels all over the Philippines with dorm beds from ₱200.

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Philippines
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Name: Boracay
Location: Western Visayas, Philippines
Boracay is a small island in the Philippines located approximately 315 kilometres (196 mi) south of Manila and 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) off the northwest tip of Panay Island in Western Visayas region of the Philippines. Boracay Island and its beaches have received awards from numerous travel publications and agencies. The island comprises the barangays of Manoc-Manoc, Balabag, and Yapak in the municipality of Malay, in Aklan Province. The island is administered by the Tourism Infrastructure and Enterprise Zone Authority and the provincial government of Aklan. Apart from its white sand beaches, Boracay is also famous for being one of the world's top destinations for relaxation. As of 2013 it was emerging among the top destinations for tranquility and nightlife.

Boracay was awarded as the 2012 best island in the world from the international travel magazine Travel + Leisure. In 2014, the resort island was at the top of the Best Islands in the World list published by the international magazine Condé Nast Traveler. In 2016, Boracay headed the magazine's list of Top 10 destinations to watch.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boracay
Name: Chocolate Hills
Location: Bohol province, Philippines
The Chocolate Hills are a geological formation in the Bohol province of the Philippines. There are at least 1,260 hills but there may be as many as 1,776 hills spread over an area of more than 50 square kilometres (20 sq mi). They are covered in green grass that turns brown (like chocolate) during the dry season, hence the name.

The Chocolate Hills is a famous tourist attraction of Bohol. They are featured in the provincial flag and seal to symbolize the abundance of natural attractions in the province. They are in the Philippine Tourism Authority's list of tourist destinations in the Philippines; they have been declared the country's third National Geological Monument and proposed for inclusion in the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Of the 1,247 hills, two have been developed into resorts for tourism as of 2006. The original viewing station of the Chocolate Hills is a government-owned and operated resort called "Chocolate Hills Complex" located in Carmen, Bohol, about 55 km (34 miles) from Tagbilaran. The other way to view the Chocolate Hills is at Sagbayan Peak, a mountain resort in Sagbayan town.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chocolate_Hills
Name: Puerto Princesa Subterranean River National Park
Location: Philippines
The Puerto Princesa Subterranean River National Park is a protected area of the Philippines. It was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1999, and voted as a New7Wonders of Nature in 2012. The park is located in the Saint Paul Mountain Range on the western coast of the island, about 80 kilometres (50 mi) north of the city centre of Puerto Princesa, Palawan, and contains the Puerto Princesa Subterranean River.

Birds comprise the largest group of vertebrates found in the park. Of the 252 bird species known to occur in Palawan, a total of 165 species of birds were recorded in the park. This represents 67% of the total birds and all of the 15 endemic bird species of Palawan. Notable species seen in the park are the blue-naped parrot, Tabon scrub fowl, hill myna, Palawan hornbill, white breasted sea eagle.

There are also some 30 mammal species that have been recorded. Most often observed in the forest canopy and along the shoreline feeding during low tide is the long-tailed macaque, the only primate found in the area. Other mammal species in the park are the bearded pig, bearcat, Palawan stink badger and the Palawan porcupine.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puerto_Princesa_Subterranean_River_National_Park
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My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

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Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

Global Immigration Leader, Big 4

“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

Internal stakeholder, Big 4

“Manny is a big reason why the move from (external provider) to the UK firm’s passport and visa provision has been so smooth. He’s an extremely likeable honest hard working guy who takes his role very seriously. We’re very fortunate to have him leading our dedicated team”

External client, Private practice

“Most of my contact was with Manpreet Singh Johal. He did the best job someone could imagine. Extraordinary service from his side.”

Team member, Big 4

“Working on two priority accounts is naturally pressurised especially where he has also been responsible for billing on both accounts; yet Manny delivers every time and this I believe is an exceptional quality.”

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