SEYCHELLES

SEYCHELLES

SEYCHELLES

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Name: Anse Lazio
Location: Seychelles
Anse Lazio is a beach situated in the northwest of Praslin Island, Seychelles, considered by Lonely Planet to be the best beach on Praslin, and one of the best in the archipelago. Located to the north east of Madagascar, east of Zanzibar and south of Socotra, in the middle of the Indian Ocean, it has clear water and pleasing scenery, luring a large portion of Praslin's tourists.

The beach is bordered by large granite boulders. However, unlike other beaches in the Seychelles, Anse Lazio is not protected by a coral reef.

Two deadly shark attacks occurred inside the Anse Lazio bay in August 2011, creating a media frenzy. The last previously known shark attack in the Seychelles was recorded in 1963.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anse_Lazio
Name: Curieuse Island
Location: Seychelles
Curieuse Island is a small granitic island 1.13 sq mi in the Seychelles close to the north coast of the island of Praslin. Curieuse is notable for its bare red earth intermingled with the unique coco de mer palms, one of the cultural icons of the Seychelles, only growing on the two neighboring islands.

Originally named "Ile Rouge" due to its red coloured soil. In 1768 the French claimed possession of the island, naming it after the schooner "La Curieuse", a ship that was under the command of explorer Marc-Joseph Marion du Fresne. Like a number of islands in the Seychelles, there was a native giant tortoise population that was quickly extirpated. In 1771 sailors set fire to the island, intending to make harvesting of the coco de mer nuts easier. The fire destroyed many of the islands' native trees, and indications of the fire can still be seen today, nearly 250 years later.

In 1829, Curieuse was first used as a leper colony, and it functioned in this capacity until 1965. This helped protect the ecosystem from human influence. Today, ruins of the leprosarium remain, as well as the former physician's residence at Anse St. Joseph (now an educational center and museum).

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curieuse_Island
Name: La Digue
Location: Seychelles
La Digue is the third most populated island of the Seychelles, and fifth largest by land area, lying east of Praslin and west of Felicite Island. In terms of size it is the fourth largest granitic island of Seychelles after Mahé, Praslin and Silhouette Island. It has a population of 2,800 people, who mostly live in the west coast villages of La Passe (linked by ferry to Praslin and Mahé) and La Réunion. There is no airport on La Digue, so to get there from a foreign country, one has to fly to Victoria and continue by ferry, usually via Praslin. It has an area of 10.08 km2, which makes it relatively easy to travel around by bike or on foot.

La Digue was named after a ship in the fleet of French explorer Marc-Joseph Marion du Fresne, who visited the Seychelles in 1768.

Today, the island's main industry is tourism, and it is known for its beaches, especially Anse Source d'Argent and Grand Anse. La Digue went through a major tourist increase in the previous century, which heavily impacted the economy of the Seychelles. In former times, copra and vanilla production were mainstays of the local economy, which is commemorated in the island's museum.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Digue
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN SEYCHELLES / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO SEYCHELLES.
FACTS:
Official Languages: English / French / Seychellois Creole
Currency: Seychelles Rupee (SCR)
Time zone: SCT (Seychelles Time) (UTC+4)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +248
Local / up-to-date weather in Victoria (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Seychelles travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Seychelles, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO SEYCHELLES.

The islands’ currency is the Seychellois rupee, denoted by the symbol “SR” or “SRe” (ISO code: SCR). ATMs usually have the best conversion rates; however, airports and banks also exchange money.

There is no longer a black market in currency.

BY PLANE:

Air Seychelles operates multiple daily flights between Mahe and Praslin. Over two dozen flights vary in frequency from 15-minute to 2-hour intervals, depending on time of day.

Air Seychelles also operates once daily or several times per week between Mahe and the islands of Bird, Denis, Fregate, Desroches and Alphonse. Assumption Island and Coetivy can be reached by air charter.

BY HELICOPTER:

Zil Air provides charter helicopter flights to/from most of the inner and outer Seychelles Islands. It is the only scenic flight operator in the Seychelles. Scenic flights can be booked to cover the main islands of Mahé, Praslin, La Digue and the surrounding smaller islands of (among others) Cousine, Félicité, Grande Seour, Curieuse and Bird Island.

BY BOAT:

Cat Cocos operates catamaran ferries that provide several daily crossings between Mahe and Praslin and a daily crossing extension to La Digue. The sailing normally takes one hour. Non-residents should budget between €90 and €100 per person (price at July 2013, based on a single adult fare of 835 rupees one way) for a same day return ticket from Mahe to Praslin. Tickets can be purchased from the Cat Cocos office, opposite the pier, on the same day before travel subject to availability.

Similarly, Inter Island Ferry operate a route between Praslin and La Digue with 8 daily departures taking 15 min to cross. Tickets cost around €15 for an adult single (July 2013). The schedule usually allows for onward connections to Mahe with Cat Cocos at Praslin harbour.

Belle Serafina, a small schooner ferry makes the passage between Mahe and Praslin or La Digue in 3-4 hours, usually departing weekdays shortly around 12 from Mahe and heading back at 5AM from Praslin to Mahe. In October 2010 the price for the passage was 125 rupees. Schedules and routing need to be confirmed by phone.

It is also possible to take small boats from Mahe direct to La Digue, although departures can be unreliable, there is limited wet weather cover and the journey takes about 3 hours (but that’s cheaper than an Indian Ocean Island cruise!).

As of June 2013, online bookings with live seat availability and e-ticketing are possible for Cat Cocos and Inter Island Ferry by Seychellesbookings.com.

BY CAR:

Driving in Seychelles is on the left side of the road. The roads on Mahe are low-traffic, mountainous, narrow roads, so caution is generally advised.

Having a car is really a good idea and makes life much more simple. For as little as 100 rupees worth of gas you can see the entire island of Mahe in a couple of hours, including stops at beaches and whatever else catches your eye. There is free parking in ‘downtown’ Victoria on Mahe, and if you go with a B&B or self-catering option for accommodations its by far the easiest way to pick up groceries. A car will also allow you access to the stores where locals do their regular shopping, and the prices are more reasonable as compared to the small convenience stores along the beaches. There is no substitute for running your vacation on your own schedule.

You can only rent on Mahé and Praslin. You can find a small car (e.g., Hyundai Atos) for €35-45 per day, but keep in mind that renters must be at least 21 years old, have a valid driver’s license, and have at least three years of driving experience. There are several car hire counters outside the arrivals hall at Mahe international airport, which provide a convenient way to compare prices from different hire companies. Prices can be negotiated, with the better rate available for rental periods of 3 consecutive days or more. The ‘excess’ payable by the customer in the event of a claim, ranges from €300 to €1000 depending on the company, so choose carefully and ask the right questions.

Taxis are also a popular means of transportation for both short trips and day rental and can be obtained almost anywhere. Taxi prices for non-residents (approx. 20 rupees per km in Sept 2010) on a relatively long trip, can easily exceed the cost of hiring a small car for a day.

BY BUS:

Seychelles Public Transport Corporation (SPTC) runs daily bus services on the islands of Praslin and Mahe from morning to evening on nearly every available road on the island. The bus usually passes by every 15 minutes. On Mahe you can easily use the SPTC bus to travel to and from the airport so long as you have local currency in small bills.

Although the bus will get you there, the schedules aren’t tight and the drivers are a bit bold on the very narrow roads if you’re a nervous passenger.

EAT:

Seychellois cuisine has been greatly influenced by the islands’ rich cultures. Creole cooking, varied seafood dishes, coconuts and curries are the most popular. The main product of the country, fish, is cooked in a variety of ways. Especially the red snapper is very tasty and well known to visitors.

There are restaurants that serve Chinese, Indian and Italian food as well as local cuisine.

Cheapest food: Collect coconuts on the beach and learn how to open their terrible cover (not the shell, that’s easy; they have a thick cover of natural fibres; to open it: hit the coconut very strongly many times on the edges, sooner or later the fibres break up).

DRINK:

Seychelles offers a fantastic nightlife scene that caters to tourists. The active nightlife is mostly located around the larger hotels and in addition to theatres, cinemas and discos, there are numerous fun and trendy restaurants.

Nightlife: Do not miss most popular nightclub “Lovenut” in the centre of Victoria, 100 metres walk from central taxi station. Also entertaining are “Tequila Boom” at (Bel Ombre) and “Katiolio” (near Anse Royale) night clubs. “Katiolio” was one of the first nightclubs to open on Mahe and boats an open-air that is directly beside the ocean.

If you enjoy a good beer you must try the local Seybrew beer, it tastes similar to a light Bavarian style beer and is a must to get you through those balmy days. You can save yourself a packet buying the beer from stores on the side of the road like the locals do rather than from hotels.

A dark Takamaka Rum on the beach under the stars is the best way to end a day on the Seychelles.

The Seychelles are not tolerant of backpackers turning up at the airport without accommodation booked. In such a situation, you will likely be taken to a counter where you will have to book & pay for accommodation for the duration of your trip before being allowed through immigration. Visitors need to provide details of their accommodation on their landing card (Hotel Name, address, phone number), and additionally, being questioned by the immigration officer about their accommodation details (“Is your booking at hotel confirmed?”, etc.)

Most accommodations are relatively expensive and some islands have only one hotel. In fact, some of the islands aren’t even permanently inhabited and accommodation can be found on fewer than 10. Your best bet for a budget bed is renting an apartment or bungalow, which are available at better rates. Also keep in mind that hotel prices greatly increase and accommodation can be hard to find during the peak seasons from December to January and July to August. Holidays such as Easter can also get very busy.

Most resorts can be found on the main islands of Mahe and Praslin. A few (very) high end ones, like the North Island, have their own private islands. Additionally, you will find an array of ‘small hotels’ which can be ideal as a get-together venue with that special feeling of exclusiveness.

While visiting, be sure to buy the classic and traditional Seychelles souvenir, the coco-de-mer, or the ‘nut of the sea,’ a nut from trees native to the islands in the Seychelles – but this requires an export licence. Other locally made souvenirs, although not as unique, can be purchased like sea shell and pearl jewellery, textiles and straw hats, in addition to needlework & crochet, paintings by local artists and woodwork.

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Seychelles
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Anse Lazio
Location: Seychelles
Anse Lazio is a beach situated in the northwest of Praslin Island, Seychelles, considered by Lonely Planet to be the best beach on Praslin, and one of the best in the archipelago. Located to the north east of Madagascar, east of Zanzibar and south of Socotra, in the middle of the Indian Ocean, it has clear water and pleasing scenery, luring a large portion of Praslin's tourists.

The beach is bordered by large granite boulders. However, unlike other beaches in the Seychelles, Anse Lazio is not protected by a coral reef.

Two deadly shark attacks occurred inside the Anse Lazio bay in August 2011, creating a media frenzy. The last previously known shark attack in the Seychelles was recorded in 1963.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anse_Lazio
Name: Curieuse Island
Location: Seychelles
Curieuse Island is a small granitic island 1.13 sq mi in the Seychelles close to the north coast of the island of Praslin. Curieuse is notable for its bare red earth intermingled with the unique coco de mer palms, one of the cultural icons of the Seychelles, only growing on the two neighboring islands.

Originally named "Ile Rouge" due to its red coloured soil. In 1768 the French claimed possession of the island, naming it after the schooner "La Curieuse", a ship that was under the command of explorer Marc-Joseph Marion du Fresne. Like a number of islands in the Seychelles, there was a native giant tortoise population that was quickly extirpated. In 1771 sailors set fire to the island, intending to make harvesting of the coco de mer nuts easier. The fire destroyed many of the islands' native trees, and indications of the fire can still be seen today, nearly 250 years later.

In 1829, Curieuse was first used as a leper colony, and it functioned in this capacity until 1965. This helped protect the ecosystem from human influence. Today, ruins of the leprosarium remain, as well as the former physician's residence at Anse St. Joseph (now an educational center and museum).

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curieuse_Island
Name: La Digue
Location: Seychelles
La Digue is the third most populated island of the Seychelles, and fifth largest by land area, lying east of Praslin and west of Felicite Island. In terms of size it is the fourth largest granitic island of Seychelles after Mahé, Praslin and Silhouette Island. It has a population of 2,800 people, who mostly live in the west coast villages of La Passe (linked by ferry to Praslin and Mahé) and La Réunion. There is no airport on La Digue, so to get there from a foreign country, one has to fly to Victoria and continue by ferry, usually via Praslin. It has an area of 10.08 km2, which makes it relatively easy to travel around by bike or on foot.

La Digue was named after a ship in the fleet of French explorer Marc-Joseph Marion du Fresne, who visited the Seychelles in 1768.

Today, the island's main industry is tourism, and it is known for its beaches, especially Anse Source d'Argent and Grand Anse. La Digue went through a major tourist increase in the previous century, which heavily impacted the economy of the Seychelles. In former times, copra and vanilla production were mainstays of the local economy, which is commemorated in the island's museum.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Digue
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN SEYCHELLES / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

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