TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

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Name: Maracas Bay
Location: Trinidad, Trinidad and Tobago
Maracas Bay is a beach on the island of Trinidad. It is located on the north side of the island, an hour's mountainous drive from the capital city of Port of Spain via the North Coast Road.

Unlike many of the northern beaches of Trinidad, Maracas Bay is protected by a deep bay. It is one of the most well known beaches in the island of Trinidad as it is considered by some to be the most beautiful beach of its size located relatively close to the capital city.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maracas_Bay
Name: Fort King George
Location: Tobago, Trinidad and Tobago
TBC
Name: Caroni Swamp
Location: Trinidad and Tobago
The Caroni Swamp is the second largest mangrove wetland in Trinidad and Tobago. It is located on the west coast of Trinidad, south of Port of Spain and northwest of Chaguanas, where the Caroni River meets the Gulf of Paria.

The Caroni Swamp is an estuarine system comprising 5,611 hectares of mangrove forest and herbaceous marsh, interrupted by numerous channels, and brackish and saline lagoons, and with extensive intertidal mudflats on the seaward side. This swamp is an important wetland since it is ecologically diverse, consisting of marshes, mangrove swamp and tidal mudflats in close proximity. The wetland provides a variety of habitats for flora and faunal species and as such, supports a rich biodiversity. It is highly productive system that provides food and protection and is a nursery for marine and freshwater species.

The Caroni Swamp still remains a popular tourist destination in Trinidad. Many tourists enjoy taking Nanan’s tour guides to the Swamp. Climate change and pollution to the swamp is becoming a main concern as Trinidad and Tobago tries to conserve Caroni Swamp.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caroni_Swamp
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO.
FACTS:
Official Languages: English
Currency: Trinidad and Tobago Dollar (TTD)
Time zone: AST (UTC-4)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +1 868
Local / up-to-date weather in Port-of-Spain (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Trinidad and Tobago travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Trinidad and Tobago, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO.

The currency is the Trinidad and Tobago dollar, denoted “TT$” (ISO currency code: TTD), also known as the “TT” (pronounced teetee). US dollars are also widely accepted.

Visa and MasterCards are accepted at many stores. American Express, Diners’ Club, Discover, JCB and others are only accepted in a few upmarket places. ATM (ABM) cards using Cirrus and Plus networks will work in local ATMs and will allow you to make withdrawals in TTD converted to your home currency. The exchange rate when withdrawing from the ATM is slightly better than when exchanging cash. There are also ATMs in a few places such as shopping malls that will dispense US dollars. Most Trinidad and Tobago ATMs do not accept PINs longer than four digits. Consider changing it to four digits before you travel. Republic Bank ATMs (Blue Machines) accept six-digit PINs.

WITHIN THE ISLANDS:

BY RIDE HAILING:

TTRS Trinidad and Tobago Ride share is a safe and convent way to get around. Download the app and get verified before you go. You can pay the driver in TT dollars or with your credit card, but you have to enter before the trip begins. Uber does not exist in Trinidad.

BY TAXI:

Taxicabs are simply normal passenger cars with no special markings. However, their license plates start with the letter “H”. They are found at Taxi stands which may be at a street corner or at the side of the road. Taxi stands in the cities and boroughs are usually marked, but outside of the city they are not. However, one can hail a taxi from the side of the road and ask where they are going and the fare before hiring the taxi. One pays for an individual seat and the taxicabs are shared, but a whole car can be hired if so desired, and if there are not a lot of passengers waiting. Airport taxis are an exception to this in that one almost always has to hire the whole car.

There are larger taxis, called “Maxitaxis” or simply “Maxis” that go along a specified route. These are similar to mini buses and are painted white or beige and have a colored band around them. Each maxi usually holds approximately 11 or 25 passengers. The colour of the band indicates the area in which they travel. They have their own taxi stands and terminals. In Port of Spain, the maxis depart and arrive at the City Gate terminal, and in San Fernando they depart and arrive at the bus terminal at King’s Wharf. These Maxi Taxis travel to the east, south and central areas of the island. In order to travel to the west there are a few designated areas such as the Diego martin/Petit Valley/Carenage/Chagaramas maxi stand located a few kilometers away from City Gate. A maxi taxi can be hired for a whole day on a chartered trip. These can be negotiated directly with the maxi taxi drivers in advance. Prices vary.

Gypsy cabs are available as well. Locally they are called “PH” because they are private cars illegally used for hire. Use caution as “PH” drivers have been linked to crime including murder, kidnapping and robbery and carry no insurance for hired passengers.

BY BUS:

Buses are run by the Public Transport Service Corporation (PTSC) owned by the Government of Trinidad and Tobago. Buses and bus tickets are available at City Gate in Port-of-Spain, King’s Wharf in San Fernando and various other terminals and bus stops. A ticket is required to board the bus. Bus drivers do not accept cash or credit cards.

BY FERRY:

There is a domestic ferry operating on the island of Trinidad between the two main cities of Port-of-Spain in the north and San Fernando in the south. The ferry ride is approximately 45 minutes between destinations and a one-way trip costs TT$15 (approximately US$2.50).

BY CAR:

Car rental is widely available, and driving is on the left side (British style). There are several companies that rent cars including international chains such as Budget and Hertz. There are also local companies such as Auto Rentals, Kalloo’s and many others. It is best to reserve a car in advance. However, one can rent a car at the airport upon arrival. The license plates of rental cars are usually designated with an “R” (meaning “Rental”) as the first letter. Some private individuals will rent cars with plates designated with the letter “P” (meaning “Private”), but this is an illegal practice and it is better to rent a car with an “R” plate.

However, it is becoming common practice for criminals to target drivers of rental cars since many locals seem to believe all foreigners are rich. So more and more car rental firms are now outfitting their cars with “P” in hopes that it would disguise the fact that the car is actually a rental.

INTER-ISLAND TRANSPORT:

There are two options for travel between Trinidad and Tobago – by ferry and by air.

Travelling by air will cost TT$300 (US$50) round trip or TT$150 one way per person. There are twelve flights per day. Flight time is approximately 25 minutes each way. Caribbean Airlines (http://www.caribbean-airlines.com) runs the service.

There are two types of ferry service – fast and conventional.

Travelling by fast ferry costs TT$50 one way and TT$100 return. Vessels are the T&T Express and The T&T Spirit, which are both owned by the Port Authority of Trinidad and Tobago. The journey is approximately 2.75 hours. The Express is the faster of the two ships, but the Spirit is newer and has better facilities.

Travelling by conventional ferry costs TT$37.50 one way and TT$75 return, but the journey is approximately 5.5 hours. Vessels are the MF Panorama and Warrior Spirit.

Vehicles can be taken aboard the ferry, but this incurs a different charge which varies by size and weight. A return trip for a private car costs TT$350. This includes the cost of the driver. You are unlikely to be able to take a rental car on the ferry since you need to show vehicle registration documents.

Only tickets for same day travel can be purchased at the ferry terminals in Port of Spain and Scarborough. For advance tickets, you must purchase tickets from some select travel agencies – at peak times tickets sell out quickly, particularly for vehicles. For ferry schedules and travel agencies, see the Port Authority website.

EAT:

Due to its varied background, Trinidad and Tobago has excellent and varied food options. In particular, the Indian roots have added to some of the best foods of any country in the world. If you can’t tolerate extremely hot and spicy food, be sure to let the cook or waiter know in advance.

Popular throughout T&T are tasty rotis, Indian flatbreads stuffed with channa (chickpea curry), usually some meat, and other items (including green beans, pumpkin, and mangoes). There are several types of roti available in Trinidad – sada, which is similar to pita or naan; dhalpouri, which is filled with ground yellow split peas; and buss up shut, a heartier bread, with a silken texture. Cheap breakfasts of sada roti and ‘choka’ – vegetables of all kinds are available for about TTand other items (including green beans-4. But the most popular fast snack is a ‘doubles’. One famous spot is “George Doubles” located in Woodbrook outside the ever famous “Brooklyn Bar”. Doubles is curried chick peas enclosed in two pieces of fried bread, and served with your choice of condiments. It is a roadside snack, available everywhere at about TTusually some meat-pumpkin. “Ali’s Doubles” is a chain that sells doubles. There are a few locations around Trinidad, mostly in San Fernando. Eat hot.

Phoulourie is another popular roadside snack. Phoulourie are small balls, made of fried ground chick peas and flour. It and other popular snack foods like roast corn, cow heel soup, aloo pies (fried potato pies) and saheena (spinach dipped in batter and fried), are often available from street vendors, especially around the Savannah.

Trinidad and Tobago is also famous for its mouth watering callaloo – a soup made from green leafy vegetables, similar to spinach or kale, sometimes with crab or pigtail added (vegetarians beware!). Callalloo is not the most appetizing of foods to look at, but it is certainly worth a try.

Another must try in T&T is the famous Bake and Shark or Shark ‘n Bake. Most easily obtained along the north coast near Maracas Bay, pieces of shark are deep fried, served in cut fried bread called “fried bake”, and accompanied by various sauces, most popular of which is a puree of shadow beni (a herb similar to cilantro).

Another popular food traditionally associated with beach limes is pelau, usually accompanied with coleslaw. Pelau, is not, however, available for purchase at the beach, although you may be able to find it in a creole restaurant.

If you have a sweet tooth, there are many local sweets and candies to sample like Toolum, Tambran Ball, Guava Cheese, Sugar Cake, Paw Paw Ball, Benna Ball, Jub Jub, Kurma, Barfi, Ladoo, Peera. Many of these will be available on the “lookout” on the way to Maracas Beach, and prepackaged in some supermarkets.

A few American-style fast food chains are available including KFC, Subway, Pizza Hut and Burger King. There are also a few franchised eat-in restaurants such as TGI Friday’s and Ruby Tuesday. There are a few local chains such as Royal Castle (chicken and chips), and Chicken Unlimited. These local fried chicken chains have a different taste from American or European fried chicken chains. Pizza Boys and Mario’s are two popular local Pizza chains. The pizza is quite different from American or Italian pizza.

Chinese food is available in many places from Chinese takeout stores. It is Cantonese style but the spices are uniquely Trinidadian.

Barbecued chicken is another popular Trinbagonian dish. It is similar to American barbecue, but with local spices. There are roadside barbecue stands that sell a box of barbecued chicken (quarter) with fries, salad and garlic bread. One popular place is The Barbecue Hut which is an open air tent where patrons will buy barbecue to sit down and eat or take away. It is on the South Trunk Road in La Romaine, South Trinidad close to the Gulf City mall. Be aware that it is run by Muslims therefore no alcohol is allowed on the compound.

The condiments available in Trinbagonian restaurants are ketchup, plain mustard, garlic sauce, shadon-beni sauce (a cilantro-like herb), hot pepper and many more depending on location. Soy sauce is available in Chinese restaurants, along with an extremely hot Chinese style pepper sauce. If taking hot pepper as a condiment, be warned! It is extremely hot! You may see locals putting a lot of pepper on their food, but remember they have been eating it for years so they are accustomed to it. It is best to try a little and if you feel comfortable add more. If in doubt, avoid it. Salt and black pepper are generally not available as in American restaurants.

Local bakeries sell pastries such as beef and chicken pies and currant rolls. They also sell hops bread which are rolls made with white or whole wheat flour. Hops bread is best eaten hot and can be enjoyed with cheese or butter for a quick snack.

DRINK:

Non-alcoholic:

The most refreshing drink on a hot sunny day is a large glass of a very cold delicious Mauby, a beverage made with the bark of the mauby tree and spices, such as anise and cinnamon. It is very refreshing and cooling, but may be an acquired taste, since it has a bitter aftertaste.

Cold soft jelly coconut water — available along the roadsides — costs about TT$3-4. And do try all the many varied local fruit juices, readily available chilled in most groceries.

Sorrel is a popular drink available during Christmas time. It is made from the boiled flowers of the Roselle (hibiscus sabdariffa) plant. It is red in colour and best enjoyed cold. It also has nutritious benefits.

Soft drinks are sweetened with cane sugar, rather than high fructose corn syrup as is the common practice in North America. This gives soft drinks a different taste, which some argue is better.

Malta is a popular drink, made from malt and hops and available from local bars, restaurants and supermarkets. It is high calorie and full of b vitamins, and best enjoyed ice cold.

Alcoholic drinks:

Rum:

Being a former sugar cane colony, Trinidad and Tobago is famous for its rum. Popular brands of rum are Black Label and Vat 19 by Fernandes and White Oak, Old Oak by Angostura. Some bars will allow you to buy individual rum drinks either straight with or without a chaser, or mixed. Some bars will allow you to purchase a whole bottle of rum, or a “half” which is equivalent to half a bottle. Some bars will sell a “nip” which is less than half. One can also purchase bottles of rum in stores and at duty free stores at the airport to carry home. Puncheon rum is a stronger type of rum (no less than 75% alcohol). It is not quite like moonshine but definitely stronger than regular rum. In fact it may not be legal to take it back with you. However it is legal in Trinidad and Tobago and is available from many local bars.

Beer:

Beer is available and quite popular. The two most popular brands of beer are Carib and Stag, which are brewed locally. Additionally, some imported beer such as Miller is available. Other malt liquor drinks are available, brewed locally, such as Smirnoff Ice, and various stouts (Mackeson, Guinness Export, etc.) There are no microbreweries in Trinidad, and beer-lovers may find the local beers not to their taste. However, a few bars do import a wider variety of beers. Of particular note is the All Out bar at the Queen’s Park Oval cricket ground in Port of Spain (94 Tragarete Road), where you will find a reasonable selection of English ales on draft, sold by the pint.

Wine and other spirits:

Wine, vodka, tequila and other spirits are usually imported. There are no wineries in Trinidad and Tobago, as the tropical climate is not conducive to the growing of grapes. Many restaurants will serve a range of imported wines, however, and wine bars, such as More Vino in Woodbrook have opened in the past few years.

Laws related to alcohol:

Not surprisingly, drinking alcohol in public is not frowned upon in Trinidad and Tobago. It is legal to drink alcohol in public. Public drunkenness may get you arrested only if you engage in disorderly conduct. Also the legal drinking age is 18 yrs. However, during election day, sale of alcohol is prohibited and must not be overtly displayed.

There are a wide variety of lodging options. There are major hotels such as Crowne Plaza, Hyatt, and the Hilton. There are also smaller guest houses, particularly in Tobago and beach houses at the coasts (especially the East coast). Rates vary. On Trinidad, many cities and towns of limited interest to the typical tourist do not have any official accommodations. Staying with locals may be the only option. However, Trinidad has developed a sporting and cultural infrastructure being multi cultural with different religious denominations and can even boast of having world class facilities for swimming, cycling, football, cricket, netball and the arts. For persons or groups of persons willing to experience or connect with similar groups at competitive rates, guest houses such as The Little Inn and the Miracle Healing cater for these niches.

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Trinidad_and_Tobago
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Maracas Bay
Location: Trinidad, Trinidad and Tobago
Maracas Bay is a beach on the island of Trinidad. It is located on the north side of the island, an hour's mountainous drive from the capital city of Port of Spain via the North Coast Road.

Unlike many of the northern beaches of Trinidad, Maracas Bay is protected by a deep bay. It is one of the most well known beaches in the island of Trinidad as it is considered by some to be the most beautiful beach of its size located relatively close to the capital city.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maracas_Bay
Name: Fort King George
Location: Tobago, Trinidad and Tobago
TBC
Name: Caroni Swamp
Location: Trinidad and Tobago
The Caroni Swamp is the second largest mangrove wetland in Trinidad and Tobago. It is located on the west coast of Trinidad, south of Port of Spain and northwest of Chaguanas, where the Caroni River meets the Gulf of Paria.

The Caroni Swamp is an estuarine system comprising 5,611 hectares of mangrove forest and herbaceous marsh, interrupted by numerous channels, and brackish and saline lagoons, and with extensive intertidal mudflats on the seaward side. This swamp is an important wetland since it is ecologically diverse, consisting of marshes, mangrove swamp and tidal mudflats in close proximity. The wetland provides a variety of habitats for flora and faunal species and as such, supports a rich biodiversity. It is highly productive system that provides food and protection and is a nursery for marine and freshwater species.

The Caroni Swamp still remains a popular tourist destination in Trinidad. Many tourists enjoy taking Nanan’s tour guides to the Swamp. Climate change and pollution to the swamp is becoming a main concern as Trinidad and Tobago tries to conserve Caroni Swamp.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caroni_Swamp
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

Global Immigration Leader, Big 4

“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

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“Manny is a big reason why the move from (external provider) to the UK firm’s passport and visa provision has been so smooth. He’s an extremely likeable honest hard working guy who takes his role very seriously. We’re very fortunate to have him leading our dedicated team”

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“Most of my contact was with Manpreet Singh Johal. He did the best job someone could imagine. Extraordinary service from his side.”

Team member, Big 4

“Working on two priority accounts is naturally pressurised especially where he has also been responsible for billing on both accounts; yet Manny delivers every time and this I believe is an exceptional quality.”

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