TURKMENISTAN

TURKMENISTAN

TURKMENISTAN

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TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Darvaza gas crater
Location: Derweze, Turkmenistan
The Darvaza gas crater is a natural gas field collapsed into an underground cavern located in Derweze, Turkmenistan. Geologists intentionally set it on fire to prevent the spread of methane gas, and it is thought to have been burning continuously since 1971. The diameter of the crater is 69 metres, and its depth is 30 metres.

The Turkmen government hopes that the crater will become a popular tourist attraction. The surrounding area is also popular for wild desert camping. According to Turkmen geologist Anatoly Bushmakin, the site was identified by Soviet engineers in 1971. It was originally thought to be a substantial oil field site. The engineers set up a drilling rig and operations to assess the quantity of oil available at the site. Soon after the preliminary survey found a natural gas pocket, the ground beneath the drilling rig and camp collapsed into a wide crater and was buried.

Expecting dangerous releases of poisonous gases from the cavern into nearby towns, the engineers thought it best to burn the gas off. It was estimated that the gas would burn out within a few weeks, but it has instead continued to burn for more than four decades.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darvaza_gas_crater
Name: Nisa
Location: Ashgabat, Turkmenistan
Nisa (also Parthaunisa) was an ancient settlement of the Iranian peoples, located near (modern-day) Bagir village, 18 km southwest of Ashgabat, Turkmenistan. Nisa is described by some as the first seat of central government of the Parthians. It is traditionally assumed to have been founded by Arsaces I (reigned c. 250 BC–211 BC) and was reputedly the royal residence of the Parthian kings, although it has not been established that the fortress at Nisa was either a royal residence or a mausoleum.

In 2007, the fortress was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Nisa was a major trading hub in the Parthian Empire. Nisa was later renamed Mithradatkirt ("fortress of Mithradates") by Mithridates I of Parthia (reigned c. 171 BC–138 BC). Nisa was totally destroyed by an earthquake, which occurred during the 1st decade BC.

Excavations at Nisa have revealed substantial buildings, mausoleums and shrines, many inscribed documents and a looted treasury. Many Hellenistic art works have been uncovered, as well as a large number of ivory rhytons, the outer rims (coins) decorated with Iranian subjects or classical mythological scenes.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nisa,_Turkmenistan
Name: Independence Monument
Location: Ashgabat, Turkmenistan
The "Independence Monument" is a monument located in Ashgabat, Turkmenistan. The design of this building was inspired by traditional Turkmen tents and the traditional headgear worn by Turkmen girls. Elements of the building commemorate the independence date of Turkmenistan, 27 October 1991. These elements include a 91-metre (299 ft) reinforced concrete tower with a 27-metre (89 ft) high golden gilt steel construction on top of the tower, along with an observation terrace with a diameter of 10 metres (33 ft). Within the building, there are exhibition halls where important works of art representing Turkmenistan history are displayed. The Monument of Independence sits on a total area of 84,500 m2 (910,000 sq ft), surrounded by green landscaping that encompasses a cascaded pool and 27 heroic statues of Turkmen leaders, centered on a golden statue of Saparmurat Niyazov.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independence_Monument,_Ashgabat
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN TURKMENISTAN / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

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New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO TURKMENISTAN.
FACTS:
Official Languages: Turkmen
Currency: Turkmenistan New Manat (TMT)
Time zone: TMT (Turkmenistan Time) (UTC+5)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +993
Local / up-to-date weather in Ashgabat (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Turkmenistan travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Turkmenistan, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO TURKMENISTAN.

The official currency in Turkmenistan is new manat, sometimes denoted by the symbol “m” (ISO code: TMT). It is divided into 100 tenge.

The US dollar is widely accepted, although it should only be accepted in international hotels or at the airport according to regulations. You will be asked to pay with dollars in hotels, certain tourist sights and for your tour operator. Be sure to take lots of USalthough it should only be accepted in international hotels or at the airport according to regulations. You will be asked to pay with dollars in hotels bills for small purchases.

You cannot exchange manat outside of Turkmenistan, so only exchange what you intend to use, as it is impossible to exchange manat back into dollar inside Turkmenistan.

There is a black market for currency in Turkmenistan. The black market rate at the Russian Bazaar was 18 manat for UShowever in Nov 2019. The black market exchangers, however, know many tricks for scamming travelers.

In 2009, a new manat was introduced at a rate of 5000 old manat for 1 new manat.

Credit cards are only accepted in big international hotels and banks in the bigger cities. Visa credit cards are the most useful. MasterCard is accepted at one bank in Ashgabat, and at the ATM in the Hotel Grand Turkmen and the Ak Altyn Hotel in Ashgabat.

BY PLANE:

Internal flights are possible on Turkmenistan Airlines which flies daily between Ashgabat, Mary, Turkmenbashi, Dashoguz and a couple other destinations. Flights are subsidised, and due to fuel costs, extremely cheap. Prices are around USD5 for a flight from Ashgabat to Mary or Dashoguz. Turkmenistan Airlines operates with a fleet of Boeing 717s, purchased in 2001. You might not be able to photograph freely in and around the airport, though this is not unheard of elsewhere.

BY BOAT:

The Amu Darya is an important inland waterway for Turkmenistan.

BY CAR:

At least in Ashgabat, like in much of the former Soviet Union, “taxis” are mostly unofficial – and can be hailed by flagging down a car by the roadside. Haggle, and agree on the destination and price in advance – knowledge of Russian will definitely come in handy. The roads in Ashgabat and Turkmenbashi are in great condition. The road from Turkmenbashi to Ashgabat is being upgraded to a two-lane, dual carriageway.

The usual sensible precautions apply here. If your instincts suggest that something might be not quite right, then it’s best to go with your instincts.

Roadblocks are in place throughout the country. You will be stopped and asked for your passport and car papers. Although inconvenient, this process won’t take too long.

Drive on the right. Minimum age: 17. International permit required. Speed limit: 60 km/h in urban areas, 90 to 120 km/h on highways. Police may also stop you for no reason. Just be polite and don’t pay them a bribe. Radar guns may be used to measure your speed. If caught speeding you should negotiate a price, a few dollars should be fine in most cases.

BY TRAIN:

Turkmenistan has at least one daily train between major cities in the country. Timetable here. Journeys are slow but heavily subsidized (a few USD in the 1st sleeping class to anywhere in the country). Tickets can’t be bought online and trains fill up fast so be sure to get one in advance. Train classes are typical for the ex-Soviet Union but most of soviet trains have been replaced with modern Chinese air-conditioned cars.

Rail service in Turkmenistan is provided by Turkmendemiryollari (Turkmenistan railways), Ashgabat, phone 3632 255545, fax 3632 473858. On the principal trains they offer soft and hard accommodation with sleeping and dining cars.

EAT:

Expect distinctly average Russian cuisine in restaurants. As in Uzbekistan, plov and more central Asian-type fare can be found in markets. If you can find it, try sturgeon from the Caspian Sea, sometimes prepared in a ‘tempura’ style.

Meals often start with a soup, as chorba, a meat and vegetable soup. Another national dish is plov, rice with mutton, onions, carrots, spices, raisins, peas or quinces. Manty are steamed dumplings filled with lamb. Ku’urma is lamb, cooked in its own fat. Ichlekli is a meat and onion pie and gutap is a pie filled with meat, potatoes, spinach and pumpkin.

DRINK:

Look out for a range of ‘Turkmenbashi’ labeled vodka, which can be washed down with the range of Russian ‘Baltika’ brand beer. It can be harder to find local beers in outlets catering to foreigners, but ‘Berk’ is well worth asking for; ‘Zip’, on the other hand, is awful.

Tea is excellent and readily available.

Best to err on the side of caution, and stick with bottled water. As in Russia, you may want to specify byehz gah-zah (literally, ‘without gas’ or ‘still; plain’) if you do not like fizzy water. ‘Borjomi’ mineral water from Georgia is available in Ashgabat’s shops.

Local people prefer to drink gok chai – green tea, often with dried fruits or herbs, as mint.

Rugs:

Turkoman rugs are famous, tending towards rich reds with geometric patterns. Some traditional patterns are unique to each tribe, and an expert can generally identify the tribe from the shape of the medallion-like pattern elements called guls. However, it is fairly common to find a mixture; when a weaver from one tribe marries into a different tribe, she may use elements from both in her creations.

Sometimes Turkoman rugs are called “Bokhara” rugs because Bukhara in neighbouring Uzbekistan was a centre for their trade. Turkmenistan is not the only source of Turkoman rugs; Uzbekistan and northern areas of both Iran and Afghanistan have some Turkoman people. Other Afghan rugs are heavily influenced by Turkoman design and Turkoman designs are often copied in India and Pakistan; dealers may also call those rugs “Bokhara” but, while some of them are fine rugs, in general they are neither as high quality nor as valuable as real Turkoman rugs.

Today, wool is often coloured with synthetic and not with natural dyes; back in the 19th and early 20th century, this was a problem because early synthetic dyes were of low quality. Today, it is much less of an issue but some collectors still prefer natural dyes, mainly because they give better arbrash, the subtle variation in colour across a rug.

You need an export permission for carpets purchased in a bazaar or private shop. The Expert Commission on the back of the Carpet Museum in Ashgabat (phone 398879 and 398887, opening hours M-F 14:30-17:30, Sa 10:00-12:00) has to certify that the carpet is not more than 50 years old and may be exported. This costs 115 manat per square metre and can take a few days. In addition carpets exceeding 1.5 square metres are subject to an export duty of 400 manat per square metre payable in USD at the official rate of exchange at customs on departure.

Some carpet factories are run by the state owned company Turkmenhaly. If you buy a carpet in a state shop, the export fees normally are included in the price, although customs will charge a commission fee of 0.2 percent of the price of the carpet.

For an accessible (still in print and sanely priced) guide to these carpets, look for books by the California collector Dr. Murray Eiland. If you intend spending a lot, and especially if you are interested in older carpets, it may be worth looking deeper. The classic book on Turkoman rugs is Tappiseries de l’Asie Centrale by AA Bogolyubov, who was Tsarist governor of Turkmenistan, published in Russian and French in St. Petersburg in 1905. It was a limited edition and is now rare and extremely expensive (several thousand U.S. dollars). If you are passing through London, the British Museum has a copy and will let visitors browse through it. A translation (the original French plus English), Carpets of Central Asia (ISBN 978-0903580052), was published in Britain in the 1960s; it is no longer in print but can be found in libraries. On the used market, it is both much easier to find and far less expensive than the original.

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Turkmenistan
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Darvaza gas crater
Location: Derweze, Turkmenistan
The Darvaza gas crater is a natural gas field collapsed into an underground cavern located in Derweze, Turkmenistan. Geologists intentionally set it on fire to prevent the spread of methane gas, and it is thought to have been burning continuously since 1971. The diameter of the crater is 69 metres, and its depth is 30 metres.

The Turkmen government hopes that the crater will become a popular tourist attraction. The surrounding area is also popular for wild desert camping. According to Turkmen geologist Anatoly Bushmakin, the site was identified by Soviet engineers in 1971. It was originally thought to be a substantial oil field site. The engineers set up a drilling rig and operations to assess the quantity of oil available at the site. Soon after the preliminary survey found a natural gas pocket, the ground beneath the drilling rig and camp collapsed into a wide crater and was buried.

Expecting dangerous releases of poisonous gases from the cavern into nearby towns, the engineers thought it best to burn the gas off. It was estimated that the gas would burn out within a few weeks, but it has instead continued to burn for more than four decades.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darvaza_gas_crater
Name: Nisa
Location: Ashgabat, Turkmenistan
Nisa (also Parthaunisa) was an ancient settlement of the Iranian peoples, located near (modern-day) Bagir village, 18 km southwest of Ashgabat, Turkmenistan. Nisa is described by some as the first seat of central government of the Parthians. It is traditionally assumed to have been founded by Arsaces I (reigned c. 250 BC–211 BC) and was reputedly the royal residence of the Parthian kings, although it has not been established that the fortress at Nisa was either a royal residence or a mausoleum.

In 2007, the fortress was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Nisa was a major trading hub in the Parthian Empire. Nisa was later renamed Mithradatkirt ("fortress of Mithradates") by Mithridates I of Parthia (reigned c. 171 BC–138 BC). Nisa was totally destroyed by an earthquake, which occurred during the 1st decade BC.

Excavations at Nisa have revealed substantial buildings, mausoleums and shrines, many inscribed documents and a looted treasury. Many Hellenistic art works have been uncovered, as well as a large number of ivory rhytons, the outer rims (coins) decorated with Iranian subjects or classical mythological scenes.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nisa,_Turkmenistan
Name: Independence Monument
Location: Ashgabat, Turkmenistan
The "Independence Monument" is a monument located in Ashgabat, Turkmenistan. The design of this building was inspired by traditional Turkmen tents and the traditional headgear worn by Turkmen girls. Elements of the building commemorate the independence date of Turkmenistan, 27 October 1991. These elements include a 91-metre (299 ft) reinforced concrete tower with a 27-metre (89 ft) high golden gilt steel construction on top of the tower, along with an observation terrace with a diameter of 10 metres (33 ft). Within the building, there are exhibition halls where important works of art representing Turkmenistan history are displayed. The Monument of Independence sits on a total area of 84,500 m2 (910,000 sq ft), surrounded by green landscaping that encompasses a cascaded pool and 27 heroic statues of Turkmen leaders, centered on a golden statue of Saparmurat Niyazov.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independence_Monument,_Ashgabat
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN TURKMENISTAN / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

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My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

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