UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

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Name: Burj Khalifa
Location: Dubai, United Arab Emirates
The Burj Khalifa is a skyscraper in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. With a total height of 829.8 m (2,722 ft) and a roof height (excluding antenna) of 828 m (2,717 ft), the Burj Khalifa has been the tallest structure and building in the world since its topping out in 2009. Construction of the Burj Khalifa began in 2004, with the exterior completed five years later in 2009. The primary structure is reinforced concrete.

Burj Khalifa was designed by Adrian Smith, of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, whose firm designed the Willis Tower and One World Trade Center. The design is derived from the Islamic architecture of the region, such as in the Great Mosque of Samarra. The Y-shaped tripartite floor geometry is designed to optimize residential and hotel space. A buttressed central core and wings are used to support the height of the building. Although this design was derived from Tower Palace III, the Burj Khalifa's central core houses all vertical transportation with the exception of egress stairs within each of the wings. The structure also features a cladding system which is designed to withstand Dubai's hot summer temperatures. It contains a total of 57 elevators and 8 escalators.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burj_Khalifa
Name: Burj Al Arab
Location: Dubai, United Arab Emirates
The Burj Al Arab is a luxury hotel located in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Of the tallest hotels in the world, it is the fifth tallest, although 39% of its total height is made up of non-occupiable space. Burj Al Arab stands on an artificial island 280 m (920 ft) from Jumeirah Beach and is connected to the mainland by a private curving bridge. The shape of the structure is designed to resemble the sail of a ship. It has a helipad near the roof at a height of 210 m (689 ft) above ground.

The beachfront area where Burj Al Arab and Jumeirah Beach Hotel are located was previously called Miami Beach. The hotel is located on an island of reclaimed land 280 meters offshore of the beach of the former Chicago Beach Hotel. The locale's name had its origins in the Chicago Bridge & Iron Company which at one time welded giant floating oil storage tanks, known locally as Kazzans on the site.

Construction of the island began in 1994 and involved up to 2,000 construction workers during peak construction. It was built to resemble the billowing spinnaker sail of a J-class yacht. Two "wings" spread in a V to form a vast "mast", while the space between them is enclosed in a massive atrium.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burj_Al_Arab
Name: Palm Jumeirah
Location: United Arab Emirates
The Palm Jumeirah is an artificial archipelago in the United Arab Emirates, created using land reclamation by Nakheel which extends into the Persian Gulf. It is part of a larger series of developments called the Palm Islands, including Palm Jebel Ali and Palm Deira, which, when completed, will together increase Dubai's shoreline by a total of 520 kilometres (320 mi). It has an estimated population of 10,500 as of 2016. It is located on the Jumeirah coastal area of the emirate of Dubai, in the United Arab Emirates.

Construction of the Palm Jumeirah island began in June 2001 and the developers announced handover of the first residential units in 2006. In early October 2007, the Palm Jumeirah had already become the world's largest artificial island. Also at this time, 75% of the properties were ready to hand over, with 500 families already residing on the island. By the end of 2009, 28 hotels were opened on the Crescent. The complexities of the construction were blamed, in part, for the extended delays to the completion of the project, the date of which was pushed back multiple times and was nearly two years late. In 2009 The New York Times reported that NASA's laser altimeter satellites had measured the Palm as sinking at the rate of 5 mm (0.20 in) per year.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palm_Jumeirah
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN UAE / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

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COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO UAE.
FACTS:
Official Languages: Arabic
Currency: UAE Dirham (AED)
Time zone: GST (Gulf Standard Time) (UTC+4)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +971
Local / up-to-date weather in Abu Dhabi (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for UAE travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to UAE, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO UAE.

The currency is the United Arab Emirates dirham demoted by the symbol ” د.إ” or “dh” (ISO code: AED). It is pegged to the US dollar at 3.67 dirhams for $1. Notes are in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1,000 dirhams. There is a one dirham coin with sub-units of 25 and 50 fils coins (100 fils = 1 dirham). There are 5 fils and 10 fils coins but these are rarely seen (and provide an excuse for traders to ‘short change’).

Cash and travellers’ cheques can be changed at exchanges located at the airports or in all the major shopping malls. ATMs are numerous and generously distributed. They accept all the major chain cards: Visa, Cirrus, Maestro, etc. Credit cards are widely accepted.

If you pay with an overseas credit card, most merchants will attempt to apply dynamic currency conversion, charging several percent more than the issuer conversion would have cost. The credit card terminal will offer the choice of whether the conversion should be accepted. The merchant will not ask you about this, and will choose to accept the conversion. If you pay attention, you can intervene and ask for “No” to be answered. If you ask upfront, some merchants will have no idea what you mean, but many will.

BY PUBLIC TRANSPORT:

Public transportation within cities is widely available and advanced, with bus stations in Abu Dhabi, Dubai, and Sharjah offering shaded air conditioned bus stops to protect people from the sun and hot weather in the summer. There is an extensive metro system in Dubai that connects various parts of the city, as well as a monorail in Palm Jumeriah and a tram in Dubai Marina area. All public transports across all the cities in the UAE are connected, either by a taxi, bus, metro, monorail, or tram. Inter-city buses are also numerous with buses taking you as far as Muscat in Oman. Intercity bus services are fast, comfortable and reasonably frequent.

In all cities of the UAE, taxis are widely available and relatively affordable. Local ride share apps such as Uber and Careem are also common in the UAE, however the prices are relatively the same compared to taxis as not to create a disparate market competition prices. A hyperloop system is under development with future plants to connect all the cities within the United Arab Emirates. The hyperloop, once inagurated, is expected to decrease the travel time between Abu Dhabi and Dubai to 6-10 minutes instead of the usual hour and 45 minutes car ride.

BY CAR:

The UAE has a modern road infrastructure with right sided traffic. Renting a car or driving in the UAE requires an international driver’s license, which is simply a translation of your standard license and can be acquired at a local automobile association. If you are a resident, you will need to obtain a local driver’s license as an international drivers license use cannot be used if you are a resident. If you have a driving license from a different country you may be able to exchange it for an Emirati driving license. This is a simple process and can be done in 20 min but only if you are from a specific list of countries. If you are from a country which is not exempt, you have to undergo 40 classes at a local driving school and get through a pretty tough license exam. This is changing, though, and license exchange may apply to all nationalities soon so check the UAE government official online Portal – Transportation to see if your country is among the countries eligible to convert your alien driving license. Car rentals are slightly cheaper than in North America. There is a flat fee per day for renting a car, based upon the car’s size. Petrol (gasoline) is, by international standards, inexpensive. The road system is based on European standards, with many roundabouts and highly channeled traffic. Signs are all bilingual (Arabic and English) and are readily understandable and are, in most places, clear and coherent. The speed limits are all documented in western Arabic numerals. Gas stations are available all around highways as well as inside cities. Tesla superchargers are also available and are being increased in number.

Driving laws:

Overtaking is performed from the left. If you are driving slow on the most left side lane, expect to be “flashed” by light from a faster incoming car behind you. It is a courtesy in this case to move from the left lane and allow the car behind you to overtake. If you do not change lanes while the person behind you is flashing his lights to signal you to move, this is considered offensive and you may encounter a road rage. Do not use the left most lane if you are driving slow. Most roads have a solid yellow line on the margins of the road that may act as an entire lane by itself. Do not cross the yellow line (this may be tempting in a traffic considering there a long empty side lane). The yellow line margin is reserved for emergency vehicles only and cannot be used by civilian use at any time except for an emergency. If you encounter an accident or a car breakdown, you may park on the side of the road and cross the yellow margin. Using the yellow margin of roads otherwise is illegal (by both cars and motorcycles) and will get you a hefty fine if you violate it. Do not make any insulting gestures while driving anywhere in the Emirates. Using an insulting gesture such as the middle finger is forbidden by law and considered a form of verbal assault, and you may find yourself in police custody or in court for using insulting gestures while on the road. Roads in the UAE are highly monitored.

The third-highest cause of death in the UAE is from traffic accidents (First is cardiovascular disease and second is cancer). People in the UAE drive extremely fast, and some are completely reckless. As a result, most of the roads adhere to strict speed limit laws. The speed limit has a margin of about 20 km/hr (except in Abu Dhabi, if you exceed the written speed limit you’ll get a ticket). Most of the roads are monitored through remote radar systems which will fine you without having to stop you. Do not expect a police officer to pull you on the side to write you a ticket. You will receive the ticket through a message in your phone (if your phone is tied to the car in registration) and you will be required to pay all traffic fines you encounter before leaving the UAE. Drones also monitor the highways and roads in rural areas, so truck drivers should take care. Drones usually photograph truck drivers who do not adhere to their specific lane or drive faster than the speed set for them.

Desert safaris:

Desert safaris and dune bashing are good attractions in the vicinity of all the emirates, but great care needs to be taken while choosing a hired vehicle; it should be a four wheel drive. Desert safaris are also generally designed with travel agents and can give you good deal as well on quantity. Do not attempt to enter the desert using one car or alone. As a general rule of thumb, more than two four wheel drive cars should enter the desert together so that if one of them gets stuck, the other can pull it out. Desert driving is a hard skill to learn. Safaris and tour groups usually take you for a desert safari and you may even be able to dune bash yourself if you desire.

Four wheel drives such as the Toyoto Land Cruiser or Nissan Patrol and trucks such as the Ford Raptor are popular in the Emirates due to the natural desert terrain and necessary off-roading in some areas. Most cars are tinted black for both privacy and to keep the hot sun rays from entering the car, hence providing a cooler temperature in the car. While driving to the desert, make sure to pay attention to any camels that may be crossing the roads.

EAT:

The UAE’s traditional cuisine is the Emirati and Eastern Arabian cuisine, however the country also offers a global cuisine. The more than 165 nationalities residing in the Emirates have made the country a destination which offers and caterers to all cuisines or religious compliant food for everyone.

Eastern Arabian cuisine:

Easter Arabian cuisine forms the major traditional food in the UAE. Emirati cuisine is sampled and widely marketed as the traditional food of the state. However, traditional Emirati cuisine is somewhat difficult to find due to the minority presence of Emiratis in their own country. Al Fanar restaurant is a famous and common Emirati-styled restaurant that was established to offer Emirati food and atmosphere for foreigners wishing to experience the country’s traditional food. Emirati food is commonly platters of fragrant rice topped with lamb, camel meat, chicken or fish that has been slow-roasted in a pit. If you have Emirati friends, being invited to their homes would generally be the best chance you have to sample the local cuisine. Arabic coffee, camel milk, and dates form the staple food of which the Emiratis have lived on for generations. Camel milk is widely available in supermarkets and is a common sight to see in an Emirati grocery store. There’s even flavors of chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry camel milk. Camel milk or Date flavored milkshakes are commonly found. Chocolate made of camel milk is also available. The UAE has established companies that use camel milk and camel meat as a major alternative to the regular chicken, lamb, and cow meat that are commonly available worldwide. Camel milk and camel meat is commonly available in the UAE and is a great chance for tourists and visitors to experience a new type of delicacy for an inexpensive price. Another famous Emirati dessert is Luguaimat (called Luqaimat in standard Arabic). The dessert is widely available and offered in almost all Emirati gatherings and is sold in a lot of restaurants and outlets as well. Ramadan is a great time to be invited to an Emirati house to experience a lot of their traditional foods.

Global cuisines:

Abu Dhabi and Dubai and, to a lesser extent, Sharjah, Ajman, Umm Al Quwain, Ras Al Khaimah, and Fujairah all offer a vast spread of food from most of the world’s major cuisines. By western standards most restaurants are quite affordable although it is easy to find extremely expensive food too. Most upper-end restaurants are located in hotels. South east Asian cuisine such as Indian and Pakistani restaurants are also widely available and can be found in every corner. Arabic cuisine such as Lebanese, Syrian and Jordanian cuisines are also available. Persian cuisine is proudly marketed around the country due to the proximity of Iran. Persian restaurants proudly present Persian atmosphere; both Islamic Persian design, Persian Empire-styled, and even Imperial Iran atmosphere with pictures of the Shah and Imperial Iranian flag adorning the restaurant depending on the Iranian owner’s fidelity. The Iranian Club in Dubai proudly caters to Iranians and is funded by the Iranian government and is run by the Iranian community in Dubai. If you have an Iranian friend its a great opportunity to be invited to experience the Persian cuisine in the Iranian Club. Since the UAE forms the home of major Middle Eastern, south east Asian, and western communities its safe to say that almost every cuisine exist around the country. South African, Nigerian, and Ethiopian restaurant are few but are still present. Chinese restaurants are also increasing in number due to the increasing Chinese community in the country. There’s even a famous North Korean restaurant in Dubai. All types of cuisines African, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, European, and American cuisines are all widely available. Finding a favorite restaurant chain should not be a problem. There’s also a lot of local chains and business start ups which offer different types of food which you may have not experienced. Pork is also available and is sold in supermarkets, albeit in a specifically designated location marked “For Non-Muslims”.

Restaurants:

Famous restaurant chains have also established branches in the country. Restaurants by the world’s most famous chefs such as Gordon Ramsey, Gary Rhodes, Guy Fieri, Nobuyuki Matsuhisa, and Salt Bae all operate restaurants around the country. In fact, some of the world famous chefs, such as Salt Bae, primary restaurant and base of operation is in Dubai such as Salt Bae’s Nusr-Et restaurant in Four Season Hotel in Jumeriah (Visited by Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo, among others). Other international food chains such as Cheesecake factory, Texas Fried Chicken, Red Lobster, PF Chang’s, Chili’s and many more all operate branches throughout the country. Fast food is also common, with many chains such as McDonald’s, KFC, Burger King, Popeye’s, Hardee’s, and Wendy’s are almost found everywhere. The major ice cream chain is Baskin Robbins, but other ice cream brands such as Cold Stone Creamery, Marbles Lab, Moishi, and Amorino are all available. Local branches of gelato and other desserts are also common. Pakistani and Indian restaurants are also very common. South Asian food in the UAE is more authentic than the food found in Europe or elsewhere due to the proximity of India and Pakistan to the Emirates. Indians, Pakistanis, Malayalis, Malabaris and Sri Lankans can be found everywhere and form the majority of the population in the Emirates. The UAE is a favorite destination for Keralites outside of Kerala, and proper authentic eastern Asian restaurants are found all over the Emirates.

Etiquette:

In public, general global and mostly western etiquette is required to be adhered. If you are invited to an Emirati’s house for food, it depends on how cultural the family is. You may be required to sit on the ground, eat with your hands, or share the same plate with everyone. It is not uncommon for Emiratis to present a feast in one big platter, and everyone sits around it and eats with their hands. The key thing to remember when doing so is to use only your right hand, as the left hand is traditionally reserved for handling dirty things. Being invited to break bread or share a platter with Emiratis is a considered a huge sign of respect and fondness. Young Emiratis are however, very understanding if you choose to have your own plate or eat with utensils, and some of Emiratis don’t even adhere to the traditional floor sitting and eating with hands style of cultural eating etiquette. A more modern etiquette is to sit on the ground with everyone having their own plate, spoon, fork, and knife while eating the food in front of you or politely asking someone next to you to serve the food away from you. Do not get up and attempt to move to the place where a certain type of food is put.

If you are invited to a Majlis (a traditional and common gathering commonly men-only or women-only), you will be presented with dates and Arabic coffee (called gahwa). The majlis is a big room or a tent with places to sit where people talk and converse. A person will rotate around the maljlis and offer you dates, dessert, or Arabic coffee. If you eat dates, remember to take them in odd numbers (1 or 3, etc..). Taking dates in even numbers is not a problem but its preferred to take them in odd numbers to adhere to the Arabic culture. If you are presented with Arabic coffee the person who rotates to pour the coffee will continue to pour you coffee until you shake the cup while presenting it to him. This signals that you do not want more coffee and he will take the cup from you. In a traditional setting, if you are entering a majlis you’ll be required to move to the chair closest to your right and shake hands with the person starting from there until you shake hands with everyone. If you’re sitting in a chair and someone is coming to greet you, you will be required to stand up and shake hands with that person before sitting down. If there is a Sheikh in the majlis, its customary to greet him first before going back and shaking hands with everyone else. Arabic men from the same tribe perform a nose kiss (also called Eskimo kiss). It may also be performed by very close friends. In an nontraditional majlis, its not customary to do any of that and simply going in and goofing around with your friends is totally fine.

If you are presented with food in an Emirati house, its customary to eat. Its considered disrespectful if you do not eat anything. If you’re full, eating small amounts is better than rejecting the food entirely. You will be presented with a lot of food if you visit an Emirati house for lunch or dinner, as Emiratis consider generosity a virtue and you’ll be disrespecting them if you don’t eat or touch any food they present you with.

Religious diets:

All food in the UAE is Halal. Kosher food is also increasingly available. Companies and restaurants such as Kosher Arabia and Eli’s Kosher Kitchen, which is supervised by Chief Rabbi of the UAE Rabbi Yehuda Sarna, are also available. Vegetarian restaurants are also widely available due to the major presence of Hindus in the country. Finding your local or favorite or religiously compliant cuisine should not be a problem in the Emirates.

DRINK:

Dubai has a burgeoning nightlife scene and even formerly straitlaced Abu Dhabi has loosened up and tried to catch up. Alcohol is available in alcohol stores, 5-star hotel restaurants and bars in all emirates except Sharjah, where you can only drink in your home or in an expat hangout called the Sharjah Wanderers. As a tourist, you are permitted to buy alcohol in bars and restaurants to drink there. If you are a resident, you’re supposed to have an alcohol license (never asked for in bars) which also allows you to buy alcohol at alcohol stores (they do check).

During Ramadan, no alcohol is served during daylight (fasting) hours. Dubai and Abu Dhabi permit bars to serve alcohol at night, but bands stop playing, background music is off or quiet, no dancing is allowed and nightclubs are usually closed. On certain holy days in the Islamic calendar, no alcohol is served publicly in any of the UAE.

Do not under any circumstance drink and drive in the UAE. If by chance you are in an accident, this becomes a card for going directly to jail — especially during Ramadan. Taxis and ride-share apps such as Uber are widely available if you have been drinking and are a much safer and wiser option given the insane driving habits in the region.

For the visitor, the UAE has one of the most spectacular ranges of tourist accommodations in the world. There are staggeringly beautiful, modern hotels, which can be expensive. However, more modest housing is also available. Hotels and accommodation in the Emirates are always available – in fact, hotels are a major revenue source for investors in the UAE. The hotels and accommodation throughout the Emirates are stunning and extraordinary luxurious due to the fact of the high luxury standards in the Emirates (particularly in Dubai) as well as the relatively new buildings and skyscrapers. Some of the most famous lodging destinations that are famous for being portrayed in movies are the Emirates Palace in Abu Dhabi and the Burj Al Arab in Dubai. Emirates Palace in Abu Dhabi also serve as a lodging destination for foreign head of states or diplomats visiting the capital city Abu Dhabi.

Almost all hotels serve alcohol with the notable exception of hotels in Sharjah. Most hotels also have various bars, night clubs, and meeting hot spots. Most resorts are built on artificial made islands such as the Palm Jumeriah in Dubai and Al Marjan Island in Ras Al Khaimah. Beach access and amenities are a given when booking a resort or a hotel on a beach.

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/United_Arab_Emirates
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Burj Khalifa
Location: Dubai, United Arab Emirates
The Burj Khalifa is a skyscraper in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. With a total height of 829.8 m (2,722 ft) and a roof height (excluding antenna) of 828 m (2,717 ft), the Burj Khalifa has been the tallest structure and building in the world since its topping out in 2009. Construction of the Burj Khalifa began in 2004, with the exterior completed five years later in 2009. The primary structure is reinforced concrete.

Burj Khalifa was designed by Adrian Smith, of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, whose firm designed the Willis Tower and One World Trade Center. The design is derived from the Islamic architecture of the region, such as in the Great Mosque of Samarra. The Y-shaped tripartite floor geometry is designed to optimize residential and hotel space. A buttressed central core and wings are used to support the height of the building. Although this design was derived from Tower Palace III, the Burj Khalifa's central core houses all vertical transportation with the exception of egress stairs within each of the wings. The structure also features a cladding system which is designed to withstand Dubai's hot summer temperatures. It contains a total of 57 elevators and 8 escalators.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burj_Khalifa
Name: Burj Al Arab
Location: Dubai, United Arab Emirates
The Burj Al Arab is a luxury hotel located in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Of the tallest hotels in the world, it is the fifth tallest, although 39% of its total height is made up of non-occupiable space. Burj Al Arab stands on an artificial island 280 m (920 ft) from Jumeirah Beach and is connected to the mainland by a private curving bridge. The shape of the structure is designed to resemble the sail of a ship. It has a helipad near the roof at a height of 210 m (689 ft) above ground.

The beachfront area where Burj Al Arab and Jumeirah Beach Hotel are located was previously called Miami Beach. The hotel is located on an island of reclaimed land 280 meters offshore of the beach of the former Chicago Beach Hotel. The locale's name had its origins in the Chicago Bridge & Iron Company which at one time welded giant floating oil storage tanks, known locally as Kazzans on the site.

Construction of the island began in 1994 and involved up to 2,000 construction workers during peak construction. It was built to resemble the billowing spinnaker sail of a J-class yacht. Two "wings" spread in a V to form a vast "mast", while the space between them is enclosed in a massive atrium.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burj_Al_Arab
Name: Palm Jumeirah
Location: United Arab Emirates
The Palm Jumeirah is an artificial archipelago in the United Arab Emirates, created using land reclamation by Nakheel which extends into the Persian Gulf. It is part of a larger series of developments called the Palm Islands, including Palm Jebel Ali and Palm Deira, which, when completed, will together increase Dubai's shoreline by a total of 520 kilometres (320 mi). It has an estimated population of 10,500 as of 2016. It is located on the Jumeirah coastal area of the emirate of Dubai, in the United Arab Emirates.

Construction of the Palm Jumeirah island began in June 2001 and the developers announced handover of the first residential units in 2006. In early October 2007, the Palm Jumeirah had already become the world's largest artificial island. Also at this time, 75% of the properties were ready to hand over, with 500 families already residing on the island. By the end of 2009, 28 hotels were opened on the Crescent. The complexities of the construction were blamed, in part, for the extended delays to the completion of the project, the date of which was pushed back multiple times and was nearly two years late. In 2009 The New York Times reported that NASA's laser altimeter satellites had measured the Palm as sinking at the rate of 5 mm (0.20 in) per year.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palm_Jumeirah
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN UAE / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

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...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

Global Immigration Leader, Big 4

“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

Internal stakeholder, Big 4

“Manny is a big reason why the move from (external provider) to the UK firm’s passport and visa provision has been so smooth. He’s an extremely likeable honest hard working guy who takes his role very seriously. We’re very fortunate to have him leading our dedicated team”

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“Most of my contact was with Manpreet Singh Johal. He did the best job someone could imagine. Extraordinary service from his side.”

Team member, Big 4

“Working on two priority accounts is naturally pressurised especially where he has also been responsible for billing on both accounts; yet Manny delivers every time and this I believe is an exceptional quality.”

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