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Name: Queen Elizabeth National Park
Location: Uganda
The Queen Elizabeth National Park (QENP) is Uganda's most visited national park.

QENP is in the Western Region of Uganda, spanning the districts of Kasese, Kamwenge, Rubirizi, and Rukungiri. The park is approximately 400 kilometres (250 mi) by road south-west of Kampala, Uganda's capital and largest city. The town of Kasese is just outside the northeastern edge of the park, while the town of Rubirizi is just outside the park's southeastern boundaries. The park includes the Maramagambo Forest and borders the Kigezi Game Reserve, the Kyambura Game Reserve, and the Kibale National Park in Uganda, and the Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Queen Elizabeth National Park is known for its wildlife, including African buffalo, Ugandan kob, hippopotamus, Nile crocodile, African bush elephant, African leopard, lion, and chimpanzee. It is home to 95 mammal species and over 500 bird species. The area around Ishasha in Rukungiri District is famous for its tree-climbing lions, whose males sport black manes. Poachers killed six elephants in the park in 2015, triggering both anger and frustration within the Ugandan conservation community.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_Elizabeth_National_Park
Name: Kibale National Park
Location: Uganda
Kibale National Park is a national park in Western Uganda, protecting moist evergreen rain forest. Despite encompassing primarily moist evergreen forest, it contains a diverse array of landscapes. Kibale is one of the last remaining expanses to contain both lowland and montane forests. In eastern Africa, it sustains the last significant expanse of pre-montane forest.

The park was gazetted in 1932 and formally established in 1993 to protect a large area of forest previously managed as a logged forest reserve. The park forms a continuous forest with Queen Elizabeth National Park. This adjoining of the parks creates a 180 kilometres wildlife corridor. It is an important eco-tourism and safari destination, popular for its population of habituated chimpanzees and twelve other species of primates. It is also the location of the Makerere University Biological Field Station.

There are 13 species of primates in Kibale National Park. The park protects several well-studied habituated communities of common chimpanzee, as well as several species of Central African monkey including the Uganda mangabey, the Ugandan red colobus and the L'Hoest's monkey.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kibale_National_Park
Name: Murchison Falls National Park
Location: Uganda
Murchison Falls National Park (MFNP) is a national park in Uganda and managed by the Ugandan Wildlife Authority. It is in north-western Uganda. Together with the adjacent 748 square kilometres (289 sq mi) Bugungu Wildlife Reserve and the 720 square kilometres (280 sq mi) Karuma Wildlife Reserve, the park forms the Murchison Falls Conservation Area (MFCA).

The explorers John Speke and James Grant were the first Europeans to visit the present day MFCA in 1862. It was more thoroughly explored by Samuel and Florence Baker in 1863-4. Baker named the falls Murchison Falls after the geologist Roderick Murchison, then the president of the Royal Geographical Society.

MFCA and the adjacent Bugondo Forest Reserve have 76 species of mammals as well as Uganda's largest population of Nile crocodiles. 450 bird species are present ranging from easy variety of waterbirds, including the rare shoe-billed stork, Budongo's 59 "restricted range" species, dwarf kingfisher, Goliath heron, white-thighed hornbill and great blue turaco. Since 2005, the protected area is considered a Lion Conservation Unit.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murchison_Falls_National_Park
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
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COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO UGANDA.
FACTS:
Official Languages: English / Swahili
Currency: Uganda Shilling (UGX)
Time zone: EAT (UTC+3)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +256
Local / up-to-date weather in Kampala (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Uganda travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Uganda, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO UGANDA.

The national currency is the Ugandan shilling, sometimes written as “USh” or “Shs” (ISO code: UGX). You’ll also see this notation: 5,000/-. There are Ush50,000, 20,000, 10,000, 5000, 2000 and 1000 bank notes and 500, 200, 100, and 50 shilling coins (10, 5, and 1 shilling coins exist but are rarely used). Do not accept banknotes from the 1987 series of notes: they are not valid, and you cannot exchanges them at banks.

Some bigger hotels and restaurants accept US dollars as payment, and safaris and rafting activities (e.g. Red Chillis in Kampala) are often priced in USD. These activities can be paid in Ugandan shillings, but a poor exchange rate is often offered. Also, there is often an extra fee (typically around 5%) on the use of credit cards. This means that it can be useful to bring USD to cover these activities. The obvious trade-off is that one must carry a large amount of USD around.

ATMs:

ATMs accept debit and credit cards throughout the country. Mastercard and Visa card branded cards are accepted by most ATMs. Stanbic Bank, Ecobank, Equity Bank, Kenya Commercial Bank, GT Bank and I&M Bank ATMs are the best ones to use. Different ATMs allow for different maximum withdrawals of USh 400,000-2,000,000, though the usual amount is USh 1000,000. There are many ATMs at Entebbe Airport; given that it is impossible to buy Ugandan shillings outside of Uganda and in countries bordering Uganda, withdrawing shillings from the airport ATMs is the easiest option.

Barclays Bank and Standard Chartered Bank have a ATM fee of at least US$4 at all their ATMs for overseas bank cards.

Ecobank and Equity Bank have no fees at all at their ATMs for overseas banks cards.

You can use Visa cards and Mastercards to get money from ATMs all over Uganda.

ATMs may close due to lack of money or system problems. In Kampala, watch out for pickpockets who follow tourists from one bank’s ATM to another when cards are not accepted.

Credit cards are accepted at businesses, usually the larger hotels, airlines, supermarkets and shops in big shopping malls.

American Express, Union Pay, JCB, Diners Club, Maestro, and Discover cards can be used to get cash at any Equity Bank ATMs of which there are many all over Uganda.

Cashing travellers cheques can be very difficult, so don’t bother bringing them into Uganda.

BY BODA-BODA:

In Kampala and some other towns, the boda-boda is a good way to get from place to place. These are small mopeds, motorcycles, bicycles or scooters with cushions on the back and are cheap transport as used by locals. If using a boda-boda, be extremely careful as they are frequently involved in accidents; however, in spite of this, they are a fun and fast way to get around. If you advise the driver that you want him to drive slower and safer, he may actually listen to you.

Make sure you agree on the price before you get on the bike. They will try and charge more claiming it was further than thought. Some may get aggressive, say you will call the police and they will calm down. Always be polite and non aggressive.

Make sure you tell them to drive slowly. Many foreigners and locals are injured and killed on Boda Bodas in Uganda.

BY BUS:

Uganda has a decent bus system. There are two classes of buses. The “taxis” (also called “matatus”) are actually minibuses or commuter vans, which run fixed routes (see below).

There are also real buses which run less frequently, usually leaving Kampala early in the morning. There are many companies most of which leave from the same general area. For example, Postbus has safe, comfortable and reliable buses going to most towns in Uganda. They depart from Kampala General post office from 7am/8am. The buses fill up, so if you get on mid-trip, you’ll be spending some time standing or sitting in the aisle before somebody gets off and you can get a seat.

Both buses and taxis run along most roads between cities, paved (sealed) or dirt.

Domestic bus travel is cheap and reasonable between major centres, and is a good choice for backpackers with time, but may not run reliably on schedule. A trip from Kampala to Masindi takes about 4 hours and costs approximately USh 12,000.

Buses and “taxis” do not run on fixed schedules. Rather, they leave their terminal stop when they are completely full. On heavily travelled routes, they fill up within minutes and this is not a problem. However, on less travelled routes (or if getting on a large bus), be prepared to wait a while before departure.

  • Link Bus Services have buses going to and from Kampala to Fort Portal, Kasese, Hoima, Masindi, Masaka.
  • Post bus Uganda has big red 67 seat buses going to 1. Gulu, 2. Kabale via Masaka and Mbarara. 3. kisoro via Masaka and Mbarara and Kabale. 4. Lira via Jinja and Mbale. 5. Kitgum via Gula. the fare from Kampala to Kabale is USh 25.000. Masaka 10,000. Mbarara 15,000. Kisoro 30,000. Lira 30,000. Mbale 15,000. Jinja 5,000. Gula 25,000. Kitgum 30,000.

BY TAXI:

The best way to get around Kampala and the neighbouring towns is by using minibus-type taxis called “taxi”. This is the most efficient and cost-effective method of transportation in urban areas, but try not to get ripped off by the conductors as they sometimes try to overcharge tourists. They usually take 14 passengers plus a conductor, though in smaller country towns overcrowding still occurs. Minibus taxis are relatively cheap, frequent (in Kampala), and may make lots of stops along the way.

They run along fixed routes, picking up and dropping off people anywhere along the route. If you want to get on, stand at the side of the road and wave your arm. To get off, say “stage” and the driver will pull over and let you off at the next boda boda waiting area. You can also just say “Driver, please pull over at X”. They’re not marked with destinations unless you are at the central taxi parks, so you’ll have to listen to the destinations that the drivers are yelling out the window. If you’re not sure where to catch a taxi going to your destination (especially at Kampala’s two taxi parks, which are huge!), just ask a nearby driver or conductor, and they’ll probably be able to point you in the right direction.

Private taxis – those which you can hire for yourself only, are called special hire taxis, and are available in most every decent sized town. Fares are negotiable over long distances as there are no meters.

BY CAR:

The roads in Uganda are comparable to many in sub-Saharan Africa. Most of the main roads are tarmaced, although the condition of them can deteriorate in patches. Some become extremely pot holed. Many of the minor roads and side roads are made of hard packed earth (murram) and, when graded, are quite quick and reasonable. However, the conditions can vary from season to season and they will deteriorate in heavy rains and wash boarding frequently occurs. The best way to deal with the wash boarding is not to slow down, but to find a speed sympathetic to the road surface and effectively skip from ridge to ridge. Untarred roads, if wet, may be impassable in the mountainous regions of the south-west. Commercial drivers of buses and trucks compound the danger, as do pedestrians, livestock, cyclists, dogs and the odd police roadblock. Plan on 60 km/h as a typical rate of travel, although the speed will vary. The best advice is drive cautiously and stay totally alert.

When planning a journey, it is best not to ask how far it is but to ask how long it will take. Local drivers normally have a good idea of how long journeys will take.

As going around with public transport may not suit the safari-going tourist, as it is hard to reach the national parks, opting to hire a car can be a budget friendly alternative. A sensible choice is to hire a 4×4 with a driver given that you will need local language assistance and expertise should something happen on the roads. Most places have accommodation and meals for drivers as this is common among travelers. A cheap option is likely to leave you stranded somewhere remote and that can mean days of your itinerary lost. Unless you are comfortable paying cash in advance without a signed contract and no network to help you get out of a breakdown, the best recommendation is to go to one of the major agencies. Nevertheless, Uganda is a country which is suitable for self-drive, taking the above described conditions into consideration, as it is safe.

There are several companies in Kampala that offer car hire, with and without a driver.

BY TRAIN:

Very limited rail services are available in and around the capital Kampala, mainly aimed at commuters.

EAT:

Food from Uganda is a sensation.

You can sample the luwombo, which is meat or groundnut sauce steamed in banana leaves. It has a tantalising aroma, and is always served with “food”, which in Ugandan parlance indicates any carbohydrate. The staple “food” varies from region to region, with the plantain matooke in the south, millet in the north, and potatoes in the west. Cassava, posho (made from ground maize), sweet potatoes and rice are other common “foods”. The whole fried fish is succulent, though mostly available at the beach, and usually served with chips/French fries. Other common options around Kampala include the traditional matooke, binyebwa (groundnut sauce), chapati, and meat stew. For the less adventurous, toasted sandwiches or omelets can be found in many places.

If this does not appeal, it is best (and far more interesting) to stop at roadside stands or markets to purchase fresh produce—fruits and vegetables abound and are very affordable, to say nothing of the roasted chicken or goat on a stick. There are also a number of fast-food places, such as Nando’s, Steers, Domino’s Pizza, and Hungry Lion, all in the city centre. The Ugandan Rolex is a popular delicacy all over the country made in a combination of an egg, onions and vegetables omelette rolled up in a chapati.

A basic local dish starts at around USh 1,500, and goes up to USh 5,600.A slice of pineapple from a street vendor can cost as little as USh 300.

See the Fang Fang Hotel below for good Chinese food in Kampala. Other Chinese restaurants with good food include Fang Fang Restaurant (different and more expensive from the hotel), and Golden China restaurant, all located in the city centre, and Nanjing Hotel in Kololo Hill.

In Entebbe, try the Boma Guesthouse on Gowers Rd. (see below under Sleep). Local food in Entebbe can be found at the Golf Course Restaurant and at the Airport Motel among other places.

In Jinja, the Ling Ling offers some great Chinese food. On Main Street the Source Café has a great variety of food, and you can surf the web while you eat.

DRINK:

Coffee is one of the best products from Uganda, but the British hooked the locals on tea, so finding a decent cup of native joe is nearly impossible, especially outside of Kampala. In Kampala, try the coffee house 1000 Cups on Buganda Road. The Source Cafe in Jinja sells Ugandan coffee at the airport, Banana Boat stores, and many hotels. The coffee is marketed under the name Kiira Kawa (River Coffee). Good African Coffee and Cafe Pap are good restaurants for food or coffee in the Kampala area. In Jinja, stop by the Source Cafe for an incredible cappuccino—they had the sweetest espresso machine! or when you are in the west at Hotel Mountains of the Moon in Fort Portal.

Chai tea is available widely, and is best in the rural areas near the tea plantations. You will see signs posted on shops and kiosks where it can be purchased.

Lower-end South African wine can be had in some restaurants, but stick with the beer. Any of the four major brands are acceptable, though the Pilsner brand is the only one made without added corn sugar for those who care about such things.

There are many hotels in Uganda. If you go on the higher end you will pay high prices, over US$100 per night. Standard traveller Guest houses, Lodges and Inns will have simple rooms with shared bathrooms for USh 15,000-30,000.

For the real budget traveler there are various backpackers’ hostels in Kampala, Entebbe, Jinja, Masaka, Fort Portal, Kabale. to choose from and to base yourself at, including Kampala Backpackers, Entebbe backpackers, Masaka backpackers, Yes hostel Fort portal, Jinja backpackers, Kabale backpackers. Some are better than others, and may suit different preferences, so it’s best to explore the reviews on Trip Advisor to assess what would be best for you. A stay in one of these will cost USh 9,000-18,000 a night, depending on whether you camp or stay in a dorm. They also offer private rooms or safari tents, and some have self-catering cottages which are great for long stay/groups. These are most frequently used by Truck tours which are popular with the less independent traveler.

There are also Bed & Breakfast establishments to make you have a homely feel at the lowest rates.

National Parks:

The accommodations provided in the national parks by UWA are generally basic but inexpensive compared to alternatives. They vary in amenities and price, and the cheapest can be as little as US$5 or less per person per night.

Few moderately priced options are available, and the high end, while expensive, are substandard compared to the high end options of Kenya, Tanzania, South Africa and other mature tourist destinations in Africa. Unfortunately, few alternatives are available. There are some notable exceptions, but best to go either highest end or stay in the UWA budget accommodations and spend more on a better vehicle!

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Uganda
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Name: Queen Elizabeth National Park
Location: Uganda
The Queen Elizabeth National Park (QENP) is Uganda's most visited national park.

QENP is in the Western Region of Uganda, spanning the districts of Kasese, Kamwenge, Rubirizi, and Rukungiri. The park is approximately 400 kilometres (250 mi) by road south-west of Kampala, Uganda's capital and largest city. The town of Kasese is just outside the northeastern edge of the park, while the town of Rubirizi is just outside the park's southeastern boundaries. The park includes the Maramagambo Forest and borders the Kigezi Game Reserve, the Kyambura Game Reserve, and the Kibale National Park in Uganda, and the Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Queen Elizabeth National Park is known for its wildlife, including African buffalo, Ugandan kob, hippopotamus, Nile crocodile, African bush elephant, African leopard, lion, and chimpanzee. It is home to 95 mammal species and over 500 bird species. The area around Ishasha in Rukungiri District is famous for its tree-climbing lions, whose males sport black manes. Poachers killed six elephants in the park in 2015, triggering both anger and frustration within the Ugandan conservation community.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_Elizabeth_National_Park
Name: Kibale National Park
Location: Uganda
Kibale National Park is a national park in Western Uganda, protecting moist evergreen rain forest. Despite encompassing primarily moist evergreen forest, it contains a diverse array of landscapes. Kibale is one of the last remaining expanses to contain both lowland and montane forests. In eastern Africa, it sustains the last significant expanse of pre-montane forest.

The park was gazetted in 1932 and formally established in 1993 to protect a large area of forest previously managed as a logged forest reserve. The park forms a continuous forest with Queen Elizabeth National Park. This adjoining of the parks creates a 180 kilometres wildlife corridor. It is an important eco-tourism and safari destination, popular for its population of habituated chimpanzees and twelve other species of primates. It is also the location of the Makerere University Biological Field Station.

There are 13 species of primates in Kibale National Park. The park protects several well-studied habituated communities of common chimpanzee, as well as several species of Central African monkey including the Uganda mangabey, the Ugandan red colobus and the L'Hoest's monkey.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kibale_National_Park
Name: Murchison Falls National Park
Location: Uganda
Murchison Falls National Park (MFNP) is a national park in Uganda and managed by the Ugandan Wildlife Authority. It is in north-western Uganda. Together with the adjacent 748 square kilometres (289 sq mi) Bugungu Wildlife Reserve and the 720 square kilometres (280 sq mi) Karuma Wildlife Reserve, the park forms the Murchison Falls Conservation Area (MFCA).

The explorers John Speke and James Grant were the first Europeans to visit the present day MFCA in 1862. It was more thoroughly explored by Samuel and Florence Baker in 1863-4. Baker named the falls Murchison Falls after the geologist Roderick Murchison, then the president of the Royal Geographical Society.

MFCA and the adjacent Bugondo Forest Reserve have 76 species of mammals as well as Uganda's largest population of Nile crocodiles. 450 bird species are present ranging from easy variety of waterbirds, including the rare shoe-billed stork, Budongo's 59 "restricted range" species, dwarf kingfisher, Goliath heron, white-thighed hornbill and great blue turaco. Since 2005, the protected area is considered a Lion Conservation Unit.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murchison_Falls_National_Park
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN UGANDA / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

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...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

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We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

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