VENEZUELA

VENEZUELA

VENEZUELA

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Name: Angel Falls
Location: Bolívar State, Venezuela
Angel Falls is a waterfall in Venezuela. It is the world's highest uninterrupted waterfall, with a height of 979 metres and a plunge of 807 metres. The waterfall drops over the edge of the Auyán-tepui mountain in the Canaima National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site in the Gran Sabana region of Bolívar State. The height figure, 979 metres, mostly consists of the main plunge but also includes about 400 metres of sloped cascade and rapids below the drop and a 30-metre high plunge downstream of the talus rapids.

The falls are along a fork of the Rio Kerepacupai Meru which flows into the Churun River, a tributary of the Carrao River, itself a tributary of the Orinoco River.

Angel Falls is one of Venezuela's top tourist attractions, though a trip to the falls is a complicated affair. The falls are located in an isolated jungle. A flight from Puerto Ordaz or Ciudad Bolívar is required to reach Canaima camp, the starting point for river trips to the base of the falls. River trips generally take place from June to December, when the rivers are deep enough for use by the Pemon guides. During the dry season (December to March), there is less water seen than in the other months.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angel_Falls
Name: Morrocoy National Park
Location: Venezuela
Morrocoy National Park is located in the easternmost coast of Falcón state and northwestern of Golfo Triste, in the west central Venezuelan coast, near the towns of Boca de Aroa, Tucacas, Sanare, Chichiriviche, Flamenco and Tocuyo de la Costa, and consists of 32,090 acres.

Morrocoy beaches are spectacular and numerous: Sombrero cay, Playuela, Playuelita, Alemán cay, Mayorquina, Pescadores cay, Mero beach, Punta Brava, Boca Paiclás, Boca Seca, los Juanes, Bajo Caimán, Tucupido, Sal cay, borracho cay etc. Beneath the beaches corals and fish offer their best to divers. Nearby there are also three islets outside the area of the park (about 7 nautical miles of Tucacas) maintaining a status of Special Protection Area: Norte, Medio cay and Sur cay.

At 285m high, Chichiriviche Hill is the highest point in the park. It stands in high relief amid the surrounding coastal environment, of Tertiary-period coral origin, belonging to the geological formation called Capadare - Agua Linda. The Chichiriviche Hill, is the landscape less associated with coastal and marine nature that characterizes the Morrocoy National Park.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morrocoy_National_Park
Name: Ávila National Park
Location: Caracas, Venezuela
The Ávila National Park protects part of the Cordillera de la Costa Central mountain range, in the coastal region of central-northern Venezuela. El Ávila is known as "el pulmón de la ciudad", the lungs of the city, as it serves many different functions for residents of Caracas, the most basic of these being navigation: the peak of El Ávila marks the north of the city. It is home to the longest cable car ride in the world, as well as activities like running, biking, rock climbing, camping, and zip-lining. El Hotel Humboldt as well as many restaurants, including La Chivera, Casa Pakea, El Jardín de Luna, Le Galipanier, Granja Natalia and Tarahumara, are all nestled in the mountain's hills. Every December, the "Cruz de Navidad" is illuminated, a large crucifix high up in the mountain that faces the city and can be seen from very far distances.

This park has a high diversity of fauna and flora. More than 100 butterfly species, approximately 120 mammal species, 20 amphibians, 30 reptiles and 500 bird species have been documented. In addition, more than 1,800 plant species from diverse taxonomic groups can be observed. Several of these plants are endemic to the Cordillera de la Costa mountain range with some endemic to the park itself.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_Ávila_National_Park
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COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO VENEZUELA.
FACTS:
Official Languages: Spanish
Currency: Petro Bolívar Soberano (VES)
Time zone: VET (Venezuelan Standard Time) (UTC−4)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +58
Local / up-to-date weather in Caracas (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Venezuela travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Venezuela, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO VENEZUELA.

Venezuela’s currency is the Bolívar Soberano (Sovereign Bolivar, ISO code VES), launched on 20 August 2018, which replaced the Bolívar Fuerte (BsF) at a rate of 100,000:1. The Bolívar Fuerte had replaced the old bolivar on January 1, 2008 at the rate of BsF 1 to 1000 old bolivars. The Bolívar Soberano is the first currency in the world to be based on a cryptocurrency (the petro, a government made cryptocurrency backed on Venezuela’s oil and mineral reserves). The change was expected to do little to curb inflation, and actually led to the rate going over 48,000% a year.

As of August 2019, most shops, restaurants and street markets have begun accepting U.S. dollars directly. As a visitor, you may not need to deal with sovereign bolivars at all.

Bolivars are not easily convertible either in or outside the country. Banks (and the few bureaux de change) give Venezuelan currency at the official rate, but there is a thriving parallel market that trades for higher rates. These unofficial rates fluctuate depending on general demand for foreign exchange, inflation and political instability. Within the “parallel market” there are various exchange rates: the tourist, the black market (a bit higher but dangerous and uncomfortable), and the bonds brokerage one (high amounts in government bonds, when on sale). That highest one, which appears as reference on certain internet pages, is the government dollar bonds rate, inaccessible unless you buy thousands of dollars in government bonds through a Venezuelan brokerage firm. This last one determines the rate of the black market one and the tourist one. The black market should be avoided unless you are sure of the honesty of the people changing currency for you. They may be scammers, thieves or even police disguised as traders. The safest parallel exchange is the tourist rate which is normally provided by higher-level people in the tourism industry (hotel managers, posada owners, etc.) The rates vary around Venezuela and from week to week. The tourist rate rarely varies in time. Once you change you cannot change back to euros or dollars unless the tourist operator that exchanged for you is nice enough to take it back.

There are widespread shortages of food and basic goods in the shops; many essential medications are becoming unattainable.

Current parallel market rates and prices can be found in these pages. (As access to the website is restricted in Venezuela, you may try searching for “dolar paralelo” or using this link. You may also consult on this page for the raw data.) However, the inflation rate is so high that not even these websites will always stay accurate – reports have abounded about Venezuelans using WhatsApp groups to set rates and prices. Venezuelan currency is also traded on eBay outside of Venezuela at various price points between the parallel black market rate and the official government rate and are marketed as a collectible item than as spending money for travel. Buying before departure will provide some spending money until you can find somebody trustworthy to exchange money in Venezuela. The difference between exchanging on the black market and the official government exchange rates is huge.

Visa and MasterCard are widely accepted, American Express and Diners Club are usually accepted at upscale restaurants, hotels and shopping centers. Merchants always ask for ID before making a credit card transaction (a passport will suffice). ATMs exist all over the country. They hand out only bolivars at the official exchange rate. Maestro debit cards are the most accepted but Visa debit cards are often not accepted because they are a “fee-scam” for the sellers (appears as “Debit” for the buyer and as “Credit” for the seller), and some ATMs also ask for the last two digits of Venezuelans’ ID numbers as an added security precaution, causing problems for foreigners with no ID number tied to their bank account.

It is best to carry small change rather than large bills as many traders, in particular taxi drivers, rarely have change. Tipping taxi drivers is not customary and can appear strange. Be a little wary of cab drivers as almost all of them are exploiting tourists, particularly from the airport to Caracas. Use only the official airport taxis (black Ford Explorers), which have a vending spot inside the airport. Buy your ticket there, first checking the fee according to the destination displayed on the counter, not asking the teller or the cab drivers directly. You can also get airport pick-up but it would be more expensive (mostly luxury hotels). For a safe taxi service in Caracas, you can use “Teletaxi”, which you can set by phone (+58 212-9534040). Please ask the fee by phone before ordering the service.

At restaurants, tipping is usually minimal. If a 10% service charge is included then some extra small change can be left on top of the total, or if not included then a tip of only 10% is customary.

BY TRAIN:

There is a single line of some 40 km (25 mi) operated by the state railway connecting Caracas and Cúa via Charallave as of 2017.

BY BUS:

The bus system is extensive and extremely affordable (in part due to the low price of fuel). Bus terminals are hectic, but it is usually easy to find a bus to any major city leaving within a short amount of time. Short bus rides (2 hours) may cost USthey are usually overly air-conditioned-7, and even extremely long bus rides (9 hours) will only cost US$10-35. The larger buses are typically air-conditioned. In fact, they are usually overly air-conditioned, so it is worth bringing a blanket with you. Buses are an easy and convenient way to get around the country. However, proper security awareness should be exercised as robberies occasionally take place on buses in cities and on highways. It is best to choose bus lines that use a metal detector and bag check to insure no passengers are carrying weapons of any kind.

If you decide to travel by bus a good option is Aeroexpresos Ejecutivo . They have their own terminal in a residential zone of Caracas (Chacao, Bello Campo), and baggage is checked on the buses (as in an airport). The buses are clean, safe and well-maintained, plus the drivers are trained to respect the speed limit (there are many accidents on regular buses on Venezuelan highways, most of them caused by speeding on poorly maintained roads). They are more expensive than a regular bus, but still cheap by American or European standards. You may pay with credit card and buy tickets in advance by phone. Aeroexpresos offers slightly more expensive options for many long routes that include semi-cama seating, chairs that recline extra, and allow for more comfortable sleeping on overnight trips.

For smaller towns, there may not be regular buses. In such cases, one can use cars-for-hire, called “por puestos.” These are typically old and run-down vehicles, but they are affordable. They are more expensive than buses, typically costing UStypically costing US$5-9 per person for a one- or two-hour ride. The main problem is that they typically wait to have a full car (4 or 5 passengers) before undertaking a route. The driver will usually try to convince you to pay for the extra passengers if you want to leave right away. The cars are popular-9 per person for a one- or two-hour ride. The main problem is that they typically wait to have a full car (4 or 5 passengers) before undertaking a route. The driver will usually try to convince you to pay for the extra passengers if you want to leave right away. The cars are popular, however, and one does not usually wait long for a car to fill up. Por puestos are identifiable by signage bearing the name of the streets or destinations they typically drive along or stop at. Avoid traveling alone in a por puesto and avoid ‘pirates’, unofficial taxis that may intend to rob foreigners.

BY CAR:

A large road network (which comprises approx. 82,000 km) and historically low fuel costs make Venezuela an attractive country for exploring with your own car.

Many roads are in good condition but there are also gravel and dirt roads for which an off-road vehicle is recommended – especially during the rainy season from May to October. This is why it is important to travel with a good road map (e.g. Venezuela Laminated Map by Berndtson & Berndtson) and to be well informed about distances, road conditions and the estimated travel time. On the web, the site of cochera andina publishes information on nearly 120 routes in the country.

You can rent a car, usually for US$20-50 a day, plus insurance and legal liability. This may make you think twice about renting a car, especially when considering the fact that renting a car with a driver usually costs the same.

Fuel is artificially inexpensive; there are many filling stations in the main areas. For outlying areas, you should fill the tank before you leave or take a reserve canister with you. In the mountains, fuel consumption often increases to over 15 L/100 km.

An international driver’s license is needed to drive in Venezuela. Police will often ask for the license as well as for the frame or motor number during routine checks. Traffic rules generally comply with the international standard. But do not underestimate the sheer chaos of Venezuela’s traffic. Be attentive when driving in Venezuela.

The often ignored traffic rules state that you must drive on the right unless overtaking and give way to traffic in a roundabout. Although the maximum speed limit is 80 km/h outside the city and 60 km/h within the city (at night 50 km/h) local drivers frequently top 160 km/h (100 mph) on intercity highways. The law obligates car occupants to drive with fastened seat belts – which is regularly ignored. If you are in a traffic jam, always other drivers will try to pass. Be aware also that motorcycles are sometimes transporting up to five people, without helmets. Pay attention at night: streets and cars as well as bicycles often have poor lights or none at all. Even “good” roads may have unexpected and deep potholes. For this reason, and for security issues in general, long-distance intercity car travel is not recommended during dark hours.

Good sign-posting is only found on the main roads. Common and especially important road signs are:

  • Curva peligrosa: “Dangerous curve”
  • Sucesión de curvas: “Winding road”
  • Reduzca velocidad: “Reduce speed”
  • Conserve su derecha: “Keep right”

IN CITIES:

Travel within cities is usually via taxi. Taxis are more expensive than any other form of transport, but still affordable when compared to North American or European equivalents. The taxis do not have meters and will charge more at night. This is normal in Venezuela, however all prices are flexible in the Venezuelan economy, so it is a good idea to negotiate the fare for the ride up front. Tipping is not expected and not necessary. The driver considers the tip as part of the fare he is charging and will factor that into his negotiations.

Local buses exist, and usually connect the terminal to the city centre. Bus routes usually remain a mystery to the uninitiated and you can try to read the signals in the windows (going to-coming from).

Caracas has a clean, modern and cheap metro system, which is being expanded. While armed robberies are almost unheard of in the metro, pickpocketing is rampant. Typically, delinquents will aim to distract the passenger and then another member of the group will remove the wallet, or bag in the opportune moment. Its best to keep bags in front of you and avoid unsolicited contact with strangers.

EAT:

Arepas, thick corn tortillas which are split and stuffed with myriad fillings, are the quintessential Venezuelan dish. The most famous variations are the “reina pepiada” (shredded chicken salad with avocado) and “domino” (stuffed with black beans and shredded white cheese). Hallacas (Venezuela’s homegrown version of the tamale, with meat, olives, raisins covered in cornmeal and wrapped in plantain leaves to be steamed) are a popular Christmas dish. Cachapas (corn pancakes often topped with a salty cheese called “telita” or “queso de mano”), empanadas (savory pastries) and the ubiquitous “perros calientes” (hot dogs) are popular street food. For slow food, try delicious fish meals, or a shrimp soup known as “cazuela de mariscos”.

The traditional Venezuelan lunch is pabellón, and consists of rice, black beans, and meat, with a side of fried plantain slices. The above dishes are known as “comida criolla”, or Creole food.

Venezuela is a leading producer of fine cacao beans and Venezuelan chocolate can be excellent. The El Rey brand has consistent quality.

DRINK:

To some tastes, especially those who prefer stronger and complicated beers, Venezuelan beers may seem thin and watery. The most popular beer brand is Polar, which is available in a low-calorie version (Polar Light), light version (Polar Ice), or premium version (Solera). Zulia and Regional are other beers available throughout the country. Whisky is very popular among Venezuelans, particularly for special events. Venezuelan-made rum is generally dark and of very good quality. Among the best is the “1796” brand from Santa Teresa. It is a Solera rum. Others popular brands of rum are Pampero “caballito frenado” and Cacique.

Venezuelans are heavy drinkers and will often go through a case of beer during vacation days, starting before breakfast, only to carry on with a bottle of rum or whisky come nightfall.

A popular non-alcoholic drink is called “chicha Andina,” which is made from rice or corn flour.

Malta or Maltin is a carbonated non-alcoholic malt drink sold alongside regular soft drinks, although it is also manufactured by the Polar company.

Venezuelan coffee is excellent, but make sure you are asking for proper coffee (machine-made, ‘de la maquina’), otherwise you might be served a ‘negrito’ or ‘guayoyo’, which can be anything from weak filter coffee to coffee-smelling brown water.

In Caracas, there is a good selection of 5-star hotels, although these are predictably expensive. At tourist spots elsewhere in Venezuela, guest houses or B&Bs, known as posadas are usually the best option, each with an individual style and usually offering breakfast or dinner if requested. Posadas can vary enormously in price and quality. Youth hostels are very scarce.

The beds in many hotels (mostly up to the mid-range levels) are nothing more than mattresses on concrete slabs that resemble box springs. Depending on what your sleep preference is, they may not be the most comfortable for you. Something for you to consider when looking for a hotel to stay at.

Handicrafts:

Hammocks and some dark wooden handicrafts can be found throughout Venezuela, as well as gaudy painted statuettes of big-busted women. Some areas such as Falcón state have a tradition of excellent glazed pottery.

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Venezuela
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Name: Angel Falls
Location: Bolívar State, Venezuela
Angel Falls is a waterfall in Venezuela. It is the world's highest uninterrupted waterfall, with a height of 979 metres and a plunge of 807 metres. The waterfall drops over the edge of the Auyán-tepui mountain in the Canaima National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site in the Gran Sabana region of Bolívar State. The height figure, 979 metres, mostly consists of the main plunge but also includes about 400 metres of sloped cascade and rapids below the drop and a 30-metre high plunge downstream of the talus rapids.

The falls are along a fork of the Rio Kerepacupai Meru which flows into the Churun River, a tributary of the Carrao River, itself a tributary of the Orinoco River.

Angel Falls is one of Venezuela's top tourist attractions, though a trip to the falls is a complicated affair. The falls are located in an isolated jungle. A flight from Puerto Ordaz or Ciudad Bolívar is required to reach Canaima camp, the starting point for river trips to the base of the falls. River trips generally take place from June to December, when the rivers are deep enough for use by the Pemon guides. During the dry season (December to March), there is less water seen than in the other months.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angel_Falls
Name: Morrocoy National Park
Location: Venezuela
Morrocoy National Park is located in the easternmost coast of Falcón state and northwestern of Golfo Triste, in the west central Venezuelan coast, near the towns of Boca de Aroa, Tucacas, Sanare, Chichiriviche, Flamenco and Tocuyo de la Costa, and consists of 32,090 acres.

Morrocoy beaches are spectacular and numerous: Sombrero cay, Playuela, Playuelita, Alemán cay, Mayorquina, Pescadores cay, Mero beach, Punta Brava, Boca Paiclás, Boca Seca, los Juanes, Bajo Caimán, Tucupido, Sal cay, borracho cay etc. Beneath the beaches corals and fish offer their best to divers. Nearby there are also three islets outside the area of the park (about 7 nautical miles of Tucacas) maintaining a status of Special Protection Area: Norte, Medio cay and Sur cay.

At 285m high, Chichiriviche Hill is the highest point in the park. It stands in high relief amid the surrounding coastal environment, of Tertiary-period coral origin, belonging to the geological formation called Capadare - Agua Linda. The Chichiriviche Hill, is the landscape less associated with coastal and marine nature that characterizes the Morrocoy National Park.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morrocoy_National_Park
Name: Ávila National Park
Location: Caracas, Venezuela
The Ávila National Park protects part of the Cordillera de la Costa Central mountain range, in the coastal region of central-northern Venezuela. El Ávila is known as "el pulmón de la ciudad", the lungs of the city, as it serves many different functions for residents of Caracas, the most basic of these being navigation: the peak of El Ávila marks the north of the city. It is home to the longest cable car ride in the world, as well as activities like running, biking, rock climbing, camping, and zip-lining. El Hotel Humboldt as well as many restaurants, including La Chivera, Casa Pakea, El Jardín de Luna, Le Galipanier, Granja Natalia and Tarahumara, are all nestled in the mountain's hills. Every December, the "Cruz de Navidad" is illuminated, a large crucifix high up in the mountain that faces the city and can be seen from very far distances.

This park has a high diversity of fauna and flora. More than 100 butterfly species, approximately 120 mammal species, 20 amphibians, 30 reptiles and 500 bird species have been documented. In addition, more than 1,800 plant species from diverse taxonomic groups can be observed. Several of these plants are endemic to the Cordillera de la Costa mountain range with some endemic to the park itself.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_Ávila_National_Park
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
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...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

Global Immigration Leader, Big 4

“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

Internal stakeholder, Big 4

“Manny is a big reason why the move from (external provider) to the UK firm’s passport and visa provision has been so smooth. He’s an extremely likeable honest hard working guy who takes his role very seriously. We’re very fortunate to have him leading our dedicated team”

External client, Private practice

“Most of my contact was with Manpreet Singh Johal. He did the best job someone could imagine. Extraordinary service from his side.”

Team member, Big 4

“Working on two priority accounts is naturally pressurised especially where he has also been responsible for billing on both accounts; yet Manny delivers every time and this I believe is an exceptional quality.”

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