YEMEN

YEMEN

YEMEN

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TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Dar al-Hajar
Location: Sana‘a, Yemen
The Dar al-Hajar is a royal palace located in Wadi Dhar near Sana‘a, Yemen. It was the residence of Yahya Muhammad Hamid ed-Din, ruler of Yemen. The building on top of a rock was built as a summer retreat.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dar_al-Hajar
Name: Al Saleh Mosque
Location: Sana‘a, Yemen
The Al Saleh Mosque is the largest and most modern mosque in Sana'a, Yemen. It lies in the southern outskirts of the city, south of the Al Sabeen Maternal Hospital. It was inaugurated in November 2008 by Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh. The mosque, 27,300 square metres in size, has a central hall which is 13,596 square metres with an occupancy capacity of 44,000. The building cost nearly US$60 million to construct. Open to non-Muslims, the mosque is frequented by tourists, and promotes moderate Islam. Security measures include police and bomb-sniffing dogs. After the Houthi-Saleh split in early December which concluded with the death of former president Ali Abdullah Saleh, the Houthi-led authorities decided to rename the mosque "The People's Mosque".

The President of Yemen was criticized in 2008 for undertaking such a grand project when the country was suffering from socio-economic problems. Several accidents occurred during its construction. The minarets collapsed multiple times, resulting in some deaths. After these occurrences, the site was used to build the Islamic college and the garden next to the mosque. The mosque was constructed using different types of stone, including black basalt stones as well as limestone in red, white and black.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Saleh_Mosque
Name: Thula
Location: ‘Amran Governorate, Yemen
Thula is a town in west-central Yemen. It is located in the 'Amran Governorate.

Thula is one of five towns in Yemen on the UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List. Dating to the Himyarite period, the town is very well preserved and includes traditional houses and mosques. Archaeological investigation discovered Sabaean period ruins with massive stone architecture beneath the Himyarite. Restoration between 2004 and 2011, restored the Bab al Mayah gate, several watch towers, paths, the traditional cistern, and other portions of the Sabaean fort.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thula
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN YEMEN / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

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COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO YEMEN.
FACTS:
Official Languages: Arabic
Currency: Yemen Rial (YER)
Time zone: AST (Arabia Standard Time) (UTC+3)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +967
Local / up-to-date weather in Sana’a (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Yemen travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Yemen, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO YEMEN.

The currency of the country is the Yemeni rial (YER or ﷼). Banknotes circulate in denominations of 50, 100, 200, 250, 500 and 1000 rials, and you are also likely to come across 10 and 20 coins.

The rial is freely convertible and subject to frequent fluctuations.

Yemen is not an easy country to get around, since foreign nationals need travel permits and, in some regions, independent travel is not possible. There is a lack of road infrastructure in the eastern Mahra region, while all other Yemeni regions have hundreds of kilometres of newly built roads. If you are an intrepid traveller, the local transport (taxis, buses, aircraft) is perfect to get around on the cheap. More expensive, but more efficient travel is to book your tour via one of the registered tour operators, that are found on the Yemen Ministry of Tourism webpage. Be aware that there are many non-registered tour operators in Yemen offering lower quality services, providing non-relevant information and many times tourists do not get all the paid services. In case of any problem, the Ministry of tourism will not be able to help you if you choose to travel with a non-registered tour operator or services provider.

For trips outside the capital, many travellers prefer a car (preferably 4WD) and may choose to hire a driver through a local travel agency. More intrepid travellers should certainly take advantage of the local intracity bus service, which is cheap, comfortable, and a wonderful way to see the country. The buses usually take a pit stop every hour or so, making this a slower but much more interesting way to travel for those who are up for an adventure and some friendly conversation. The biggest company in Yemen is Yemitco, their offices can be found in major cities.

Additionally, all travel outside the capital will require a travel permit (tasriih) from the tourist police; their station is 30m up the canal from the Arabian Felix Hotel. You need your passport, list of destinations and how long you are going to stay outside the capital. No photos required, however bring a photocopy of your visa and the picture page in your passport, as the photocopier there often doesn’t work. This takes about 15 minutes. Office is closed from noon to (let’s say) 14:00. Then you take many photocopies of the tasriih which you hand over at military checkpoints along the way. This may seem inconvenient, however it is designed to prevent travellers unwittingly venturing into areas of tribal unrest—and vice versa. Some areas of the country are off-limits to travel without military escorts, and still other areas are totally off-limits to travel. While the concept of staying informed about local conditions in your intended destinations is an overused one, in Yemen it is essential, as failure to do so may result in kidnappings or worse. No tasriih is checked if you fly to main cities in Yemen, like Aden, Al-hudaida etc.

The usual Middle Eastern shared taxi system exists in Yemen. In every city and often in towns there is at least one shared taxi (bijou, from Peugeot) station, from where cars go to different destinations. Just ask anyone for your destination and they will point you to a car going there. The driver will not depart until all seats are completely full, which means 2 people in the passenger’s seat, four in the middle and three in the back in a standard Peugeot almost invariably used for this purpose. If you want to travel in more comfort, you can pay for two seats or for the whole row. If you’re a woman travelling alone you might be offered two seats in front for the price of one, but often you’ll be asked to pay for both.

EAT:

Yemeni cuisine differs markedly from the rest of the Arabian Peninsula, and is a real highlight of any trip to the country—particularly if shared by locals (which is an invitation most visitors will receive more often than they might expect).

The signature dish is salta, a meat-based stew spiced with fenugreek and generally served at the end of the main course. The taste may take newcomers by surprise, but it is a taste well worth acquiring.

Yemeni honey is particularly famous throughout the region, and most desserts will feature a liberal serving of it. Bint al-sahn is a sort of flat dough dish which is drenched in honey. Other sweet foods well worth the trying are Yemeni raisins.

While not a “food” per se, something else to put in one’s mouth is the qat leaf. This is the Yemeni social drug and is chewed by almost all of the population from after lunch until roughly dinnertime. The plant is cultivated all over the country, and most Yemenis are more than happy to offer visitors a branch or two. Actually chewing qat is something of an art, but the general idea is to chew the small, soft leaves, the soft branches (but not hard ones) and to build up a large ball of the stuff in a cheek. The ability to chew ever-increasing balls of qat is something of a mark of pride among Yemenis, and the sight of men and boys walking down the street in the afternoon with bulging cheeks is one the visitor will soon get used to. The actual effects of qat are unclear, although it generally acts as a mild stimulant. It also has something of an appetite-suppressant function, which may explain why there are so few overweight Yemenis in spite of the nature of their cuisine. Insomnia is another side effect.

DRINK:

Yemen is officially a dry country; however, non-Muslims are entitled to bring up to two bottles of any alcoholic beverage into the country. These may be drunk only on private property, and venturing outside while under the influence is not a wise decision.

Many juices and soft drinks are readily available, but you should avoid more scruffy-looking juice shops as they might be using tap water as base. Many Yemenis will drink tea (shay) or coffee (qahwa or bun) with their meals. Yemeni coffee is considerably weaker than the strong Turkish coffee found elsewhere in peninsular Arabia.

Tap water should be avoided. This is comparatively easy to do, as bottled water—both chilled and at room temperature—is readily available everywhere.

Outside of the capital and the major centres (Sana’a, Aden and al-Mukalla), accommodation tends to be rather basic and generally of the mattress-on-the-floor variety, generally with shared shower rooms and WCs. Most larger villages will have at least one funduq, which will provide this sort of accommodation. The places tend to be named the [Name of Village] Tourist Hotel. Electricity supplies tend to be a little erratic, so hot water cannot always be counted on.

Funduq accommodation is not rated on the star scale used in other countries, but rather on the Yemeni “sheet” scale, with “no-sheet” being the most basic and “two-sheet” the top of the line. Some other hotels, mostly in Sana’a, go by the star scale, most notably the Movenpick, Sheraton, and the Hilton. This does not mean that in a “no-sheet” funduq one will not receive a sheet, although in some places it may be worthwhile to bring one! Most funduqs will offer some food, almost invariably local cuisine, and the better ones will serve it in a diwan-style room, where one can eat while reclining on cushions. In some funduqs, dinner will be followed by a “party”, featuring performances of traditional music and jambiya dances—sometimes with audience participation.

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Yemen
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Dar al-Hajar
Location: Sana‘a, Yemen
The Dar al-Hajar is a royal palace located in Wadi Dhar near Sana‘a, Yemen. It was the residence of Yahya Muhammad Hamid ed-Din, ruler of Yemen. The building on top of a rock was built as a summer retreat.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dar_al-Hajar
Name: Al Saleh Mosque
Location: Sana‘a, Yemen
The Al Saleh Mosque is the largest and most modern mosque in Sana'a, Yemen. It lies in the southern outskirts of the city, south of the Al Sabeen Maternal Hospital. It was inaugurated in November 2008 by Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh. The mosque, 27,300 square metres in size, has a central hall which is 13,596 square metres with an occupancy capacity of 44,000. The building cost nearly US$60 million to construct. Open to non-Muslims, the mosque is frequented by tourists, and promotes moderate Islam. Security measures include police and bomb-sniffing dogs. After the Houthi-Saleh split in early December which concluded with the death of former president Ali Abdullah Saleh, the Houthi-led authorities decided to rename the mosque "The People's Mosque".

The President of Yemen was criticized in 2008 for undertaking such a grand project when the country was suffering from socio-economic problems. Several accidents occurred during its construction. The minarets collapsed multiple times, resulting in some deaths. After these occurrences, the site was used to build the Islamic college and the garden next to the mosque. The mosque was constructed using different types of stone, including black basalt stones as well as limestone in red, white and black.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Saleh_Mosque
Name: Thula
Location: ‘Amran Governorate, Yemen
Thula is a town in west-central Yemen. It is located in the 'Amran Governorate.

Thula is one of five towns in Yemen on the UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List. Dating to the Himyarite period, the town is very well preserved and includes traditional houses and mosques. Archaeological investigation discovered Sabaean period ruins with massive stone architecture beneath the Himyarite. Restoration between 2004 and 2011, restored the Bab al Mayah gate, several watch towers, paths, the traditional cistern, and other portions of the Sabaean fort.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thula
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN YEMEN / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

Global Immigration Leader, Big 4

“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

Internal stakeholder, Big 4

“Manny is a big reason why the move from (external provider) to the UK firm’s passport and visa provision has been so smooth. He’s an extremely likeable honest hard working guy who takes his role very seriously. We’re very fortunate to have him leading our dedicated team”

External client, Private practice

“Most of my contact was with Manpreet Singh Johal. He did the best job someone could imagine. Extraordinary service from his side.”

Team member, Big 4

“Working on two priority accounts is naturally pressurised especially where he has also been responsible for billing on both accounts; yet Manny delivers every time and this I believe is an exceptional quality.”

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