ZIMBABWE

ZIMBABWE

ZIMBABWE

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Name: Hwange National Park
Location: Matabeleland North, Zimbabwe
Hwange National Park is the largest natural reserve in Zimbabwe. The park lies in the west, on the main road between Bulawayo and the Victoria Falls and near to Dete.

The Park hosts over 100 mammal and 400 bird species, including 19 large herbivores and eight large carnivores. All Zimbabwe's specially protected animals are to be found in Hwange and it is the only protected area where gemsbok and brown hyena occur in reasonable numbers. Grazing herbivores are more common in the Main Camp Wild Area and Linkwasha Concession Area, with mixed feeders more common in the Robins and Sinamatella Wild Areas, which are more heavily wooded.

In October 2013 it was discovered that poachers killed a large number of African elephants with cyanide after poisoning their waterhole. Conservationists have claimed the incident to be the largest illegal killing of animals in Southern Africa in 25 years. Three of the poachers were caught, arrested, tried, convicted and sentenced. All royal game and elephant poaching offences now have a mandatory 9-year sentence and the supply chain is also targeted.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hwange_National_Park
Name: Mana Pools National Park
Location: Zimbabwe
Mana Pools National Park is a 219,600 ha wildlife conservation area and national park in northern Zimbabwe. It is a region of the lower Zambezi River in Zimbabwe where the flood plain turns into a broad expanse of lakes after each rainy season. As the lakes gradually dry up and recede, the region attracts many large animals in search of water, making it one of Africa's most renowned game-viewing regions.

The park was inscribed, in conjunction with the Sapi Safari Area and Chewore Safari Area as a single UNESCO World Heritage site in 1984.

Mana means ‘four’ in Shona, in reference to the four large permanent pools formed by the meanderings of the middle Zambezi. These 2,500 square kilometres of river frontage, islands, sandbanks and pools, flanked by forests of mahogany, wild figs, ebonies and baobabs, is one of the least developed national parks in Southern Africa. It has the country’s biggest concentration of hippopotami and crocodiles and large dry season mammal populations of the zebra, elephant and Cape buffalo. The area is also home to other threatened species including the lion, cheetah, Cape wild dog, and near-threatened species including leopard and the brown hyena.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mana_Pools_National_Park
Name: Nyanga National Park
Location: Zimbabwe
Nyanga National Park lies in the north of Zimbabwe's Eastern Highlands. One of the first national parks to be declared in the country, it contains the highest land in Zimbabwe, with green hills and perennial rivers. Most of its terrain consists of rolling downland, sometimes lightly wooded, lying at altitudes between 1,800–2,593 metres (6,560–7,544 feet). Mount Nyangani, the highest point in Zimbabwe, lies in the centre of the park and Mutarazi Falls, Zimbabwe's highest waterfall, is in the south of the park.

The national park is one of the oldest in Zimbabwe, established as Rhodes Inyanga National Park, a bequest from Cecil Rhodes. The original park borders extended beyond Udu Dam, along the east bank of the Nyangombe River to the north of the current park boundary.

A wildlife checklist compiled over several years reveals a remarkable diversity of mammals, including occasional sightings of species such as buffalo and lion that stray into the region from the Mozambique lowlands. Visitors are likely to see kudu, reedbuck, klipspringer and several other antelope; predators, including leopard and hyaena, are also present.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nyanga_National_Park
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN ZIMBABWE / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

COUNTRY INFORMATION GUIDE
PLEASE SEE BELOW FACTS, USEFUL US GOVERNMENT TRAVEL LINKS AND BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES, FOR TRAVEL TO ZIMBABWE.
FACTS:
Official Languages: Chewa / Chibarwe / English / Kalanga / Koisan / Nambya / Ndau / Ndebele / Shangani / Shona / sign language / Sotho / Tonga / Tswana / Venda / Xhosa
Currency: United States Dollar (USD) / South Africa Rand (ZAR) / UK Pound Sterling (GBP) / Euro (EUR) / India Rupee (INR) / China Renminbi (CNY) / Japan Yen (JPY) / Australia Dollar (AUD) / Botswana Pula (BWP)
Time zone: CAT (UTC+2)
Drives on the right
Calling code: +263
Local / up-to-date weather in Harare (and other regions): BBC global weather – click here
US GOVT TRAVEL LINKS:

For more useful information on safety & security, local laws / customs, health and more, please see the below official US travel.state.gov web link for Zimbabwe travel advice. NB: Entry requirements herein listed are for US nationals only, unless stated otherwise.

You can also find recommended information on vaccinations, malaria and other more detailed health considerations for travel to Zimbabwe, at the below official US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) weblink.

BUSINESS VISITOR ACTIVITIES*:
Activities you may undertake on a business visa / as a business visitor:
PERMISSIBLE
ATTENDING MEETINGS / DISCUSSIONS: TBC
ATTENDING A CONFERENCE: TBC
RECEIVING TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED): TBC
NON-PERMISSIBLE
AUDIT WORK: TBC
PROVIDING TRAINING: TBC
PROJECT WORK: TBC
*This information does not constitute legal advice and is not an exhaustive list. For a full legal assessment on business visitor activities, please revert to your internal company legal team / counsel.
TRAVEL INFORMATION**
It is highly recommenced that you access the above official US travel.state.gov web link and read all safety & security information prior to making your travel arrangements / planning your trip.
PLEASE CLICK / TOGGLE BELOW FOR USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION TO ZIMBABWE.

Since 24 June 2019, the only legal tender in Zimbabwe has been the new “Zimbabwe dollar” (Z$, ISO code ZWL), also known as the “RTGS dollar” or the “zollar”. It includes Zimbabwean bond notes, bond coins and mobile money such as Ecocash. New Zimbabwe dollar banknotes were issued in November 2019. The value of the currency is volatile. The exchange rate published on xe.com refers to old Zimbabwean dollars so is completely wrong.

However, as of 23 December 2019, there is a shortage of Zimbabwe dollar notes, and it’s not possible to make cash withdrawals using an international bank card. It is impossible for foreigners to obtain cash in the country; you must bring foreign currency cash with you.

As of January 2020, most retailers and service providers are trading their products in U.S. dollars or pegging their prices in Zimbabwe dollars using U.S. dollar black market rates. Some retailers and public transport operators are no longer accepting denominations lower than the Zimbabwe dollar coin. Wikivoyage articles generally quote prices in U.S. dollars.

There are many ATMs which take Visa and MasterCard. However, you will not be able to withdraw money from any ATMs, so bring plenty of cash. Try to obtain Zimbabwean dollars before you arrive, otherwise you will have to change your U.S. dollars after you arrive. If bringing U.S. dollars, bring smaller denomination notes, e.g. US$20 and below. Anything larger is unlikely to be accepted. Change will be given in Zimbabwean dollars.

Many banks do not have enough bank notes due to a shortage of paper, so will only change U.S. dollars for Ecocash. Registering for Ecocash is recommended. You will need your ID to buy an EcoNet SIM card at EcoNet shops or other small phone shops. You can then register for EcoCash, but you will need to produce your ID again to activate your account. You can then load your account at a bank, and spend money in most shops using your PIN.

A growing number of businesses accept Visa and MasterCard in Zimbabwe, however shop workers are often resistant to use them. Be careful what currency your card is charged in, otherwise you may get charged US$10 instead of Z$10!

Between cities, you travel using luxury coaches like Pathfinder and Citilink. You can also get decent buses from RoadPort in Harare to other major cities including those in neighbouring countries like Johannesburg, Lusaka, Lilongwe.

Minibus taxis are available for intra-city transport, and are relatively inexpensive by European standards. They provide a cheap, though a not necessarily comfortable way of seeing the true Zimbabwe.

The condition of the roads in Zimbabwe seems to have improved considerably since the stabilisation of the economic. Roads between Victoria Falls and Bulawayo, Bulawayo and Masvingo (Great Zimbabwe) and Masvingo and Mutare are all in relatively good condition. The highway between Plumtree and Mutare (passing through Bulawayo and Harare in between) is being resurfaced.

Almost no fuel station in Zimbabwe takes credit cards. Also road blocks are common but usually police just want to see your driver’s licence and your Temporary Import Permit (TIP). Police can fine you if you do not have reflective reflectors on your car, red hazard triangles in your boot, a spare tire, or a fire extinguisher, so be sure to carry those items if you want to avoid a fine.

The taxi app in Zimbabwe is called Vaya, but you will need a Zimbabwean phone number to use it. Its exchange rate is fixed at Z$1 to US$1, so you will want to pay in Zimbabwean dollars (RTGS).

BY TRAIN:

The more adventurous tourists could travel by train around Zimbabwe. National Railways of Zimbabwe runs services between most major cities at least three times per week. However, due to ongoing economic difficulties and dilapidated tracks, there are often delays and cancellations. The most popular route is the daily overnight train between Bulawayo and Victoria Falls. This train passes through Hwange National Park, one of the biggest national parks in Africa, and there are plenty of opportunities to see wild animals along the route. There is an tri-weekly overnight service between Bulawayo and the capital Harare as well.

EAT:

For a sample of what Zimbabweans eat (in some form, nearly every day), ask for “sadza and stew/relish.” The stew part will be familiar, served over a large portion of sadza – a thick ground corn paste (vaguely like polenta and the consistency of thick mashed potatoes) that locals eat at for lunch and supper. It’s inexpensive, quite tasty and very filling. There is a plethora of good Zimbabwean food- “Mbambaira” or sweet potatoes, “chibage” corn on the cob, for example. Fruits indigenous to the country like “masawu” for example. For foreigners, especially from the West, Zimbabwean meat is very tasty, especially the beef, because of the great way that animals are raised and fed and not pumped up with hormones, etc.

The restaurant and coffee-shop scene in Harare is great, with a wide variety of places to choose from.

DRINK:

Mazoe, the local orange squash, is the quintessential Zimbabwean cordial.

A variety of domestic brews are made in Zimbabwe, mainly lagers with a few milk stouts. You may even want to try “Chibuku” a local brew popular among working class men that’s based on a traditional beer recipe made from sorghum and/or maize (corn). It is generally sold in a 2-litre plastic bottle called a ‘skud’ or a more popular variety called “Chibuku Super” that comes in a disposable 1.25 litre plastic container and costs USmainly lagers with a few milk stouts. You may even want to try “Chibuku” a local brew popular among working class men that’s based on a traditional beer recipe made from sorghum and/or maize (corn). It is generally sold in a 2-litre plastic bottle called a ‘skud’ or a more popular variety called “Chibuku Super” that comes in a disposable 1.25 litre plastic container and costs US$1. As with all alcohol. As with all alcohol, it’s definitely an acquired taste! There is also a limited range of local wines, usually found within a much larger variety of imported wines. The South African creamy liqueur, Amarula, is a common delight.

Imported drinks and locally made franchises are available as well as local “soft drinks” (carbonated drinks/sodas). Bottled water is also available.

Zimbabwe has a great number of tourist facilities, and offers a variety of accommodation options, from international hotels to guest houses, lodges, backpacker hostels and safari camps for all budgets.

If you are on a safari tour there are tented camps, chalets and camping sites in most of the safari areas.

Most places have a backpacker hostel with prices from US$10 a night.

**All travel information has been sourced from wikivoyage. However like wikipedia, wikivoyage is an open platform editable by any member of the public. Therefore, although very useful, all above information IS INDICATIVE ONLY and must be verified prior to personal use. Moreover, if you wish to see more information please visit: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Zimbabwe
TOP ATTRACTIONS
PLEASE CLICK / HOVER ON THE IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Name: Hwange National Park
Location: Matabeleland North, Zimbabwe
Hwange National Park is the largest natural reserve in Zimbabwe. The park lies in the west, on the main road between Bulawayo and the Victoria Falls and near to Dete.

The Park hosts over 100 mammal and 400 bird species, including 19 large herbivores and eight large carnivores. All Zimbabwe's specially protected animals are to be found in Hwange and it is the only protected area where gemsbok and brown hyena occur in reasonable numbers. Grazing herbivores are more common in the Main Camp Wild Area and Linkwasha Concession Area, with mixed feeders more common in the Robins and Sinamatella Wild Areas, which are more heavily wooded.

In October 2013 it was discovered that poachers killed a large number of African elephants with cyanide after poisoning their waterhole. Conservationists have claimed the incident to be the largest illegal killing of animals in Southern Africa in 25 years. Three of the poachers were caught, arrested, tried, convicted and sentenced. All royal game and elephant poaching offences now have a mandatory 9-year sentence and the supply chain is also targeted.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hwange_National_Park
Name: Mana Pools National Park
Location: Zimbabwe
Mana Pools National Park is a 219,600 ha wildlife conservation area and national park in northern Zimbabwe. It is a region of the lower Zambezi River in Zimbabwe where the flood plain turns into a broad expanse of lakes after each rainy season. As the lakes gradually dry up and recede, the region attracts many large animals in search of water, making it one of Africa's most renowned game-viewing regions.

The park was inscribed, in conjunction with the Sapi Safari Area and Chewore Safari Area as a single UNESCO World Heritage site in 1984.

Mana means ‘four’ in Shona, in reference to the four large permanent pools formed by the meanderings of the middle Zambezi. These 2,500 square kilometres of river frontage, islands, sandbanks and pools, flanked by forests of mahogany, wild figs, ebonies and baobabs, is one of the least developed national parks in Southern Africa. It has the country’s biggest concentration of hippopotami and crocodiles and large dry season mammal populations of the zebra, elephant and Cape buffalo. The area is also home to other threatened species including the lion, cheetah, Cape wild dog, and near-threatened species including leopard and the brown hyena.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mana_Pools_National_Park
Name: Nyanga National Park
Location: Zimbabwe
Nyanga National Park lies in the north of Zimbabwe's Eastern Highlands. One of the first national parks to be declared in the country, it contains the highest land in Zimbabwe, with green hills and perennial rivers. Most of its terrain consists of rolling downland, sometimes lightly wooded, lying at altitudes between 1,800–2,593 metres (6,560–7,544 feet). Mount Nyangani, the highest point in Zimbabwe, lies in the centre of the park and Mutarazi Falls, Zimbabwe's highest waterfall, is in the south of the park.

The national park is one of the oldest in Zimbabwe, established as Rhodes Inyanga National Park, a bequest from Cecil Rhodes. The original park borders extended beyond Udu Dam, along the east bank of the Nyangombe River to the north of the current park boundary.

A wildlife checklist compiled over several years reveals a remarkable diversity of mammals, including occasional sightings of species such as buffalo and lion that stray into the region from the Mozambique lowlands. Visitors are likely to see kudu, reedbuck, klipspringer and several other antelope; predators, including leopard and hyaena, are also present.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nyanga_National_Park
FLIGHT TIMES / MAJOR CITIES
PLEASE SEE BELOW MAJOR CITIES IN ZIMBABWE / CLICK OR TOGGLE BELOW FOR FASTEST AVERAGE FLIGHT TIMES FROM USA.

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

New York: TBC
Washington DC: TBC

...WHO ARE WE?

...WHO ARE WE?

…WHO ARE WE?
…WHO ARE WE?

My name is Manny and I would like to personally welcome you to Global Visas.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluable.

Our team is dedicated to providing a consular service which focuses on attention to detail, delivering a personal approach and with a high focus on compliance. Feedback is very important to us, therefore any comments you provide about our service are invaluableI have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects...

I have provided some of my own personal testimonials over my years in immigration below; working and leading on very large projects.

Please do also view our introductory video at the following web link:

https://usglobalvisas.com/personal/more/about-us

We look forward to working with you and meeting all your expectations.

Global Immigration Leader, Big 4

“Manny. You have really gone the extra mile in supporting the US Business Visitor Service. You have demonstrated real commitment and energy, working a late shift night while we try and find others to fill the position. I know that the other night you stayed until 4am. You are always so positive and your cheerful disposition and attention to detail has resulted in excellent client feedback. On Monday the key client came to London and she was effusive about the service. This is largely due the cover you provide.”

Internal stakeholder, Big 4

“Manny is a big reason why the move from (external provider) to the UK firm’s passport and visa provision has been so smooth. He’s an extremely likeable honest hard working guy who takes his role very seriously. We’re very fortunate to have him leading our dedicated team”

External client, Private practice

“Most of my contact was with Manpreet Singh Johal. He did the best job someone could imagine. Extraordinary service from his side.”

Team member, Big 4

“Working on two priority accounts is naturally pressurised especially where he has also been responsible for billing on both accounts; yet Manny delivers every time and this I believe is an exceptional quality.”

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